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THE DERBY.

The many peculiar and exciting features of the Derby Day have beeu so often and so fully chronicled, that it would be quite in vain for us to attempt to impart novelty to the event. We doubt if Baron Rothschild agrees with this sentiment, or if those jjfiidng His frit-fids ifho backed Favonius find difficulty in" ittijiartin^ tiorelty to the Occurrence over which they rejoice to-day. Favonihs won easily. Outsiders were Milled liy tbe'h&me, ft'r the wltine'r fadd. Up to Sn hour before (life tMo, Still figured in the lists a? the nameless son of Jkplljfr But that an immense number of people on $he course were yesterday delighted at the result was proved by the enthusiastic mobbing Baron RotliscShlld etfperJeiiccd oh p'i'dc'eedfng to hta carriage iimiiedidtely after the Derby, to be, if not the first teller of the good news to those withiu it, to at least secure their congratulations as the fii>t he received. The white hat, which was said to represent Baron Rothschild, Was for bevefal minutes bobbing to and fro Hfee a.gofk m & fottfrtpt, asd ,•• Brjpo Baron !" " Ooray for the Baron \ wlicf allers runs straight and has won at last 1" 11 Shake 'ands Baron !" " Let's J ove a look at 'im there, will yer ?" came from a crew of shouting, jostling people, who fought, and pushed, and strove, ac if to behold the Derby winner of 1871 were the one object for wbish they hud been brought into the world. The police did their best to guard the object of all tn'is enthusiasm, froiu .the turfeuletit devotion of his fanatical aha not t'pH savory wofsh'ippers' ~ ettde'aWihg to ibriii ah iiflprtiflifcttt guard of honor as he walked, and beating back a man or two herd and there. Hut they were completely worsted ly numbers; and the owner^of the ..white hat— for the mob was .so dense,' qJk| p/b fiercely; eager," that juinc.ttepfbft.of' t?iose. t comjiosiiig it iqoS the statement tuat it was Baron BotLchild they wero surging round upon pure faith — will probably remember the Unpleasant qu.irter of an hour he spent in straggling o\ er a few yards between the ring and his carriage as long as the victory, the flattering, but uncomfortable attentions he e*pres%d vefe meantjo crown* Before giving a detailed descrip'tloH of tlie i ! a;ce, Jet it be understood that the' Derby Day of 1871 was a decided success. There may have been more carriages upon the hill u.pon preceding ■ occasions, but there has tiever been a Derby wh?<jti , seetHtd td go more joyously in which there was MS drunken:. ess, and liot, or in which the dra^s and other vehicles of high degree were better turned out, better boised, or Letter filled. There was an aristocratic air about a vast number of the equipages both upon the Hill and in the Eiic.'osure, which we venture to say v>&s never surpassed in the palmiest 3ays bT tUe road j aiid Wuf examination und comparison were rendered more than usually critical by a simple, but comically singular circumstance. The preparations fLr the start created intense excitement. At 3 o'clock to a minute, the horses come from the paddock, and the usual preliminaries are gone through. We pass by the inappropriate flbgj the intrusive wanderer,' arid the eiier^{ictic cubr'.a 6T thfe police. The starlet dnd black cap of Albert Victor, the dHrk-b'ltie-snd-silrer of Bothweli, the yellbw-aml-blaek cap of King of the Forest — or rather the beautiful creatures these colors indicate — are fastened on by iKotaa'nds upon thousands of eyes. 'J he " know ing ones " pepper Bbthwell Irtoie furiously than cyer the instant Le is seen{ and at one mbilient the Ring appeared to be occupied chiefly in laying and offering bets on this horse. Concerning Albert Victor, opposing opinions ran high; while the Pearl, and Kipponden, Ravenshoe, and the winner, all had supporters to the last. The Prince of Wales who saw the race from that small priva'e stand opposite the judge's chair, whic'i has become famous of late years for its exalted visitor^ was snid to be especially attracted ly the son of Zephyr from the moment the animal cantered past j and Ittany o^her Jess distinguished people t<<ok ihe same view; The time devoted to the start was, except perhaps to Boron Rothschild, the most trying pciiod of the day. Again and ngain, " They're off !" was shouted ; and again and again were the nuiimls brought reluctantly into line, and the 6ame abortive business gone through. Minutes soon run, or appear to run, into hours w hen this kind of aggravated suspense continues, anl many strong opinions were expressed as to the necestity of adop'.iug some more stringent rules against the offenders who make false starts possible. When the fl:ig was at length lowered, The Pearl was quickest on her legs, making play, followed by Digby Grand, Columbus, Hyperion, Noblesse, Rippondcn, King of the Forest, Bothweli, and Favoniue, Ravenshoe, who began slowly, bringing up the rear. A fter the first 109 yardsj The Pearl gave way to Ilv-perion and Digby Grand, the last-named pair drawing char of the field j of whom, in addition to Mr Chaplin's filly, Noblesse, Columbus, Ripponden, Fuvoniufi, and Bothweli were now most conspicuous in front. When half a mile had been covered, Raven»boe'B long stride be»an to tell, and he closed up with the body of his horses as they ran through the furzes, at which point Mr Feeder had had enough of it, and dropped back last, the pace, it may be meutioned, being excellent. Running town the hill towards Tattenbam Come", Digby Grand held a clear lead of Columbus and Hyperion, Hipponden lying up next, clofely succeeded by Albert Victor, The Pearl, Favonius, Bothwcll, and King of the Forest. Rounding the bend into the straight, The Pearl and Bothweli were bea'.en, while Hyperion and Columbus also retired, Fuvonius taking second place to D : gby Grand, about a quarter of a mile from home. Here Ravenshoe, next the rails, drew up, but was unable to respond to Challoner'g call below the distance, where Ripponden was also in trouble, and King of the Forest and Albert Victor drew up to Favonius. The Baron'a colt, however, was full of running, and Tom French, taking a look light and left to see that nothing was dangerous, sent him to the front a couple of hundred yards from home, where he headed Digby Grand, and having his opponents settled directly he began racing, the handsome son of Parmesan and Zephyr came away, and won in a canter by a length and a half. A capital race for second place resulted in a dead heat between Albert Victor and King of the Forest, while Digby Grand, who struggled gamely on to the end, was only beaten a head from the pair. Ravenshoe was fifth, Bothweli sixth, Ripponden seventh, Mr Feeder eighth, the Count ninth, and Grand Coup next, the last lot being Pearl, Noblesse, Columbus, and Field Marshal, the absolute la*t being Eneide.

A very " absent-minded " professor was coming out of college one day, when a cow brushed slightly against kirn; the doctor mechanically lifted his hat and muttered, "I beg your pardon ma'am." and a day or two afterwards, as he was again coming from his class he stumbled against a lady, and at once exclaimed, "Is that you you beast P"

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https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/WCT18710816.2.13

Bibliographic details

THE DERBY., West Coast Times, Issue 1834, 16 August 1871

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THE DERBY. West Coast Times, Issue 1834, 16 August 1871

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