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West Coast Times. FRIDAY, AUGUST 28, 1868.

Ouu Victorian intelligence brought us yesterday by the ltan^iloto' steamer, if possessed of considerable interest to the general reader, will not, we fear, prove very gratifying to the admirers of popular government. Both Houses of Parliament met on the 7th insUnt, after the elections rendered necessary by the re -accession ot 1 the M'Culloch Ministry to power. livery member of that Ministry, as well those n.'w to office as the former colleagues of the Prime Minister, were re-elected by their respective constituencies, and under circumstances that left no room for doubt that the popular opinion was most decidedly with the new Ministry. This Wl to a belief that, rendered generous by such a victory, the party that has so long dictated the Victorian political creed would have overlooked past animosities, and forgetting p.ist differences, have abandoned that party warfare* to which everything elso had, for the last year or two, been made subservient, leading; to a long legislative and financial dead lock, and instead thereof have devoted themselves to the introduction and pas-sing of measures of practical and useful legislation. The appointment of a Chairman of Committees iv the Legislative Assembly was looked on as the touchstone by which the M'Culloch Ministry, on their resumption of office, might be judged. Mr M'Culloch in the selection of the new members of his cabinet had laid himself open to the charge of having been guided by the extreme views they entertained, and it was anticipated that acting on the same principle Mr Lalor, a constant supporter, but of moderate views, who had for years discharged the duties of Chairman of Committee with credit to himself and advantage to the House, would be in the new Parliament supplanted by a supporter of more violent tactics ; and, although many refused to believe in such a resuscitation of party politics, the result has proved that Government and a majority of the House prefer to submit the guidance of their deliberations to a political firebrand of no experience, to the exclusion of a gentleman, whose claims, founded on long experience and a dignified discharge of the duties of the office, were ignored simply because lie had rendered himself obnoxious U> the charge of enlrrtainim* and expressing moderate views. Mr Lalor, who has been Chairman of Committees for years, lias been rejected, and iv his stead reigns Mr F. L. Smyth, almost a new man, and one of whom nothing is known except his memoiablc declaration at an election meeting, that if the Upper House did not in the matter of the Darling grant give way to the Legislative Assembly, the crack of the rifle would soon be heard beneath the windows of the Legislative Council. Vicioiia cannot be congratulated on the selection made, and llie cause of popular Government has been grievously injured by some of the means to which the dominant party have had recourse, and by the frequency with which charges of corruption have been made during the brief sitting of the new Parliament. Such a charge brought against Mr Laler was not only unsupported by a shadow of evidence, but was repudiated by the present and late Ministers of Mines, whoso influence he was accused of procuring and then making merchandise of. Similar charges, and some of them with more appearances of truth, havo been made in Parliament, and against men of higher, position than even Mr Lalor. The late Chief Secretary, Mr Sladen, has brought against Mr M'Culloch, his predecessor and successor, a chaige of having, as a private merchant, largely bonefitted himself by suspending, as a Minister of the Crown, n Revenue Act, and thus saving the firm of which he is a member a largo amount of Customs' duties clue, but not collected. Mr M'Culloch of course indignantly denies the charge. lie admits "the noncollection of the duties for a time, but says, and with a circumstantiality bearing every appearance- of truth, that they were at the proper time paid. The circumstances are not in any view cred^atylo to colonial legislation pr

ndminibUation, but there is little doubt ' Mr M'Cullooh will pass through the inquiry without a stain on his personal honor. This, we fear, is more than can bo said of charges made against his colleague, Mr Jone?, who, in his brief career as a public man, has bsen everything by turns and nothing long ; a denouncer to-day of the party of which he was a member yesterday. If he is not a political barometer it is not from any want of tho mercurial clement. Except when he made a false move ia resigning his post as whipper-in to the former M'Culloch Ministry, ho has generally been found on the winning .side, and so well has he of late played his cards, that, though distrusted on all sides, ho, of all men, holds two portfolios in the preseat Victorian cabinet — two single ministers rolled into one. \et -aven he is not beyond the reach of calum .y. When recently seeking at Ballarat re-election as a men ber of the present M'Culloch Ministry, he was accused of having received money from the opponents of that Ministry for the purpose of upsetting the former M'Culloch Ministry. Mr Jones, in the most solemn manner, tljnied the charge, declaring on his word and honor that ho had received no such money, or any other money from that party, who, however, have renewed the charge in the clearest and most unmistnkeable language, supported by affidavits and by a complete chain | of evidence from witnesses that have nothing to gain by falsehood, but everything to fear should their affidavits prove untrue. Other members of the House have their little difficulties, and the enquiries already granted, or asked, promise to constitute the Victorian House of Assembly, for a time, at least, a gigantic school for scandal. It is in such a state of the political horizon in what claims to be the the first of British Colonies that the late Minister of Justice has seen fit to introduce a bill for amending the parliamentary representation law. He proposes giving all the great centres $f population three, instead of as, at present, two representatives ; a device by which he seeks to solve the much vexed question of representation of minorities. The peculiar feature of the bill, however, is a provision for '* compensation to members," which he proposes to allow at the rate of a pound per day, for a session of sixty days. This compensation is to meet " the outlay " of honorable members in attending parliament. This compensation, tho mover said, he preferred to payment of members, which he believed would introduce a class of trading politicians. For all practical purposes the distinction between compensation and payment is a fanciful one, and not likely to be generally recognised ; and the compliment to Victorian politicians thai sixty pounds v session would raise their status is so trauspaient that, except for the gravity of the subject, we might suspect that the hon. Mr Fellows was quizzing the House. Of the passing of tho measure into law there can be no hope, though its discussion promises to again raise the whole question of payment to members. Probably the most interesting item of intelligence to the people of New Zealand will be the increased disfavor with which Victoria views the Panama Mail Service. In tho Executive, in Parliament, and throughout the press ; there is a singular unanimity of opinion on this point ; and iv the future continuance of the service New Zealand need calculate on no co-operation from Victoria, wliich seems to have set its heart on the continuance of the Suez route, and the introduction of an alternate mail via the Gape of Good Hope, so as to maintain fortnightly communication.

Cobb and Co.'s coach arrived from Christ - church last night at eleven o'cloi-k. Passengers — Mr Roberts, and one wayside. Mr Young, who on this occasion drove for Mr Shepard, states that, finding that the coach from Chrisrchurch had not arrived at the Cass, ho, on "Wednesday morning, proceeded on until ho got to Willis' (thirty-five mile 3 from CJiri:.tchurch), which lie reached last night, and there found tiie other coach. Ho left Willis' for Jlokitika yeslerday morning, nn:l arrival nt Cobb and Co.'s ofiire here as above slated. The cause of the delay was that the driver of the coach from Christ church, finding that the snow lay thickly on Porter's Pass, hud returned to Willis'. Mr Young slates that the road is now quito passable, and although snow had fallen on Arthur's Pass, it was not so deep as on tho olhor side of tho ranges. Ho also states that tho plains of Canterbury were covered with n, white mantle, and that bw> inche-3 of snow had fallen in Christchurch. Mr Young deserves credit tor the pluck and energy he has displayed on this occasion.

We perceivo that tho Cusino de Venise is now open nightly, and that tho price of admission is extremely moderate.

Mr Binney, as will bo seen by advertisement in .mother column, will sell by auction, this forenoon,, on tho wharf, alongside tho Brothers and Sisters, apples and eggs in case i onions and carrots, in bags; as also thirty pigs and a quantity of poultry, all ex the schooner Iforon, from Ilobart Town.

A report of the death of Dr Slouriylan was prevalent in town on Wednesday. This report turns out to ba without foundation, for although ho has been suffering sovcrely from abscesses in both ears, yofc uuJer the skilful treatment of Drs Hyley and Itosetti, ho is recovering. Yesterday was a busy day on the South Spit, The announcement that an attempt would bo commencoJ to cut n, direct channol for the river from tho wharf to the sea, and that the services of a number of men wil'i long handled fchovels would bo required, caused quite an oxeiioment from tin early hour in tho morning, when numbers of tho inhabitants turned out to watch tho proceedings. About eight o'clock, under the guidanco of-MrFrew/fownSurveyor; and Captain Turnbull, Harbor Hasler, sevenly-ono men commencod operations, and continued with a will throughout, fcho day, raising on each side of them immense walls of sand, which, it is hoped, iimy ypfc form the future banks of tho MQUth, of the river. Tho work will bo rorpsumoil this morning, and }t ia expected that,

before evening, the men will be able to send the water through the now channel, and thus solve the question of the possibility of making a navigable passage between the eea and wharf. One gratifying circumstance connected with tho work yesterday commenced was tho proof it afibrJcd that there aye nob so many unemployed men in Hokitika aa in generally supposed. Sufficient notice was given that men would b a required for tho work, and though every man that offered his services was taken on at 191 9 6d an horn and unlimited beer, and there could be no objec bone to the nature of the work a S unpleasant or disagreeable, the number of men who offered was, as stated, only seventy-one.

About twenty members of tho Hokitika Fire Brigade assemble J, last evening, under Captain Macfarlane, at the Fira Brigade Hall Revell stieot, for the usual fortnightly practice. Tho men wero exercised in several forai3 of in-door practice with tho engine, hose, reel, and hook and laddor apparatus tho wholo of which was gone through in a very creditable manner. Tho attention which these valuable body of men pay to their drill i 3 not only worthy of commendation but also of imitation.

By tho steamer Rob Roy we (Melbourne "Age ") have L'Liinceston papers to the 10th instant. The Tusmunian Parliament was in full flow of debate over the financial statement, which was mado on the 7th. The treasurer admitted a deficiency of £15,000j for wliich he offered no present provision, but engaged to do so at a future sitting.

A fatal boat accident occurred this morning, resulting in Ihe death of one man. It appears that, tempted by the extraordinary smoothness of the surf, two boatmen left the Totar.i Lagoon in a flat-bottomel boat, with tho intention of fishing. Whon about half-a-mile from the shore the boat was observed to upset, and both men wero seen swimming about. One came on shore, but the other, after clinging to the bont's mast for some time, disappeared.

An old Hamilton resident, now in Japan, sends to the local paper a letter describing Japanese ways of life, concluding with this bit of advice • — " First and foremost, to all young men who think of coming in search of situations, don't come. To business men, with moderate capital, don't eonio here. Why ? Because, owing to the internal dissensions of the natives, and of civil ward, produce is proventcd coming from tho interior : thus tho largo mercantile houses aro at a standstill, and are, and have been discharging their clerks and assistants, having nothing for them to do ; and oven when clorks aro wanted, thoy aro all sent specially out from home. Those that are in business aro all men of very large capital, and are ablo to stand v little reaction, taking into consideration the past prosperous times. As for tradesmen, there is no branch of trade in which a Japanese or Chinaman cannot successfully compete with Europeans, as thoy can make anything from a pattern. A native tailor can make a pair of trousers equal to anything in Hamilton, for 2s 6d ; so you cau judge from that. Living is very dear. Numbers of young men li'ivo been here from Melbourne, and returned in disgust, after waiting here for months for a situations, backed up even with letters of recommendation to the first houses here. You cannot here, when hard up, take to digging, shepherding, oplitting or bullock-driving, as iv Victoria. There is none but mercantile pursuits open to white people, so that when a young man's money inns out, God help him."

The Hobart Town " Mercury" of August 6th, says : — " We learn from ono of the salmon commissioners that the spawning for tho present season is now over, and that the rill at the head of the trout pond at the Plenty exhibits in places a compact naas3 of spawning bads or rids, from which an ample supply of ova has been removed for distribution. Many of the egga have been examined microscopically, and exhibit in exety instance a healthy embryo. From the same source we have tho more gratifying intelligence that during the past two months (June and July) the brown trout in the River Plenty havo been forming their rids, which abound for a distance of two miles above the ponds, to such an extent that in many places the mounds of gravel, oach the resting place of thousands of ova, literally touch one another. To sportsmen accustomed to the trout rids of an ordinary English brook, answering in size to our Plenty, somo of theso recently made rids would appear gigantic, many of the mounds being from six to eight feet iv length by about two feet in breadth, the gravel of which they are composed containing stones of more than a pound iv weight. The largest rids wero formed by fi-ih varying from .eight to ten pounds in woight, and each pair was, in many instances, engaged from three to four days in thu construction of ono rid. "The great excitement on' Change during the past two or three duya," remarks the 'Sou:h Australian Register,' " has been the Amanda Silver Mine. Several parties have visited the site of the property, and have, we understand, been strongly impressed with tho richness of the prospect held out, as well as by tho apparently extensive character of the deposits of ore. The promoters are very sanguine, and a number of transactions are reported at a high Sguro. The assays made have, we are informed, varied from 80 to 396 ozs. to the ton. On Thursday last a number of specimens were brought down by indopcudent parties, and sent for assays to four or five difforent assayers. The return given by one of them, Mr James, 1220Z 1 ?. to the ton. The other returns are not yet iv."

A fight between blacks of tho Brisbane and one of tho coast tribes took place on the night of the 30th July. The " Brisbane Courier " gives tho following account : — " ATany of tho Brisbane blacks have lafcoly been working for settlers in the neighbourhood, but so quietly ha 1 tho arrangements for tho fight been kept that little or nothing wa< known of it until an unusual stillnoss in tho camps directed attention to somothitig unusual bsing on foot. It was then found that tho blacks wero making a general muster, and about nine p.m. fic-ivo yells showed their whereabouts. Somo whites, attracted by the noise, wore soon on the fiold of battle, but all their efforts could not stop a fight from t'ikiug place, until many of tho blacks were wounded, not a few of them seriously. Tho women of the tribes seemed the most oagor for the fighting, and by their yelling encouraged the men to 'go in' again, after somo of them evidently, if left alone, though they had enough of it."

" Just as tho Miranda affair was fadiug from the memories of those upon whom that individual had operated so successfully," says tho " Sydney Morning Herald," " another distinguished viaitoy hns favored some of our

fellow citizens with his confidence. He arrived here a few months ago, and was introduced at one of the leading clubs as a foreign count, allowed one of tho foreign consuls the honor of making him acquainted with his friends, and his appearance at the opera usually caused quite a stir amongst tho occupants of the dress circle. Unfortunately by some mishap his remittances did not arrive with that punc tuality that might have been expected, but his advices sho wed thathohad only to draw upon his home hankers for any amount he might re- a quire. This he seems to have done pretty i freely, and siiccceded iv borrowing monoyj and negotiating bills to a large amount. Since then he has proceeded on his tour, and from advices received by the mail steamer it is pretty certain that there was riot an atom of truth in his financial statements, and his victims are not likely cither to see him or their money again."

The extraordinary uphcavings of tho sea experienced ou tho New Zealand Coast, on the 15th instant, were felt on the Tasmauian coast. A Hobart. Town journal says :— " On Saturday, 15th instant, a most remarkable phenomenon was witnessed at New Town, near the residence of Captain Bailey. Early in the morning a tidal wave was seen approach- — wg the shore, of vast body, and spread over a largo area of hitherto dry land. This phenomenon waa ropeatevl at intervolsthrouohout tho entire day, and was naturally a m.itter of much curiosity to the residents of the neighborhood." On tho South Australian coast also was the phenomenon observed. Both the Adelaide papers notice it in theso terms :—": — " The tidal wave which occurred in New South Wales on Saturday, 15th instant, was also noticed in the Gulf, and I lie signalman has a most interesting record of the sudden rise and fall, with subsequent oscillations. Althongh not as lai'ge as it appears to have been in Sydney, there can be no question of its being the same."

Tho " Melbourne Age" of the 18th inst. contains the folio wing telegram from Sydney relat 'ye to theeffoct of an earthquake wave which visited tho coast of New South Wales on the 15:h inst.' the same clay that it swept the coast of New Zealand. The telegram alluded to say 3:— " The extraordinary tidal phenomenon which commenced on Saturday morning, and extended along the coast northwards to beyond Newcastle, continued throughout Saturday night and yesterday, only ceasing at night* The wave decreased in volume until it altogether subsided. TII3 action could have had nothing to do with tidal influence, as tbe waves often came in directly against the ebbing tide, and rose in tho rivers against tho tidal stream, producing a strong whirlpool. Ifc is supposed to havo resulted from volcanic action in the South Seas at some distance eastward, and that the waves were tho rings of the circle occasioned by such a phenomenon, expending themselves on the Australian coast. Some disasters to small craft happened at Newcastle. Vessels were torn away from their moorings, aiid the greatest alarm prevailed for some time amongst the shipping generally.' 1

We take the following from last evening's " Despatch" :—

The return Greymouth conveyance arrived at the office to day, at half-past 1, bringing 8 through passengers — Messrs. Humphry, Mendershausen, Graves, Craig, M'Rae, Foley, Cohen, and Perry, and one wayside.

From a telegram received, we find that tho Christchurch coach hud not passed the Beoley this morning ; neither is it known if the coach which left here had reached the Cass. It is very likely the detention is caused by the heavy falls of snow which have taken place lately.

The member of the Hokitika Fire Brigade will assemble at the Brigade Hall, Revellstreet, this evening at eight o'clock, for the usual fortnightly practise.

The polling fof the election of nine councillors for the Borough of Greymouth, which took place yesterday, terminated in the following genticnion being chosen : — Messrs. Wickes, Parkinson, Coates, Ashton, Moore, Strike, BTGuffin, Rue and Kilgour.

Cobb's coach left this morning for Greymouth at nine o'clock. Passengers —Mr Frest and two others, and a wayside.

We notice that the steamer Charles Ed- ~" ward left tho Grey this afternoon for Hokitika. She- will cro33 the bar to-night, and to-morrow evening sails for Manukau and interniediato ports.

Several men, upwards of fifty in number, assembled this morning at the boatmen's stairs, each armod with along-handled shovel, and were conveyed in boat 3to the South Spit where they at onco commenced to cut a channel with the hope of inducing the river to take a new course. We sincerely trust that this hope will be realised to it 3 fullest extent, and that the first fresh that comes down the river will so enlarge the temporary channel aa to ren-der it easily workable not only for steam tuga.but also for sailing vessels.

The Municipal Council of Hokitika has published a by-law, prohibiting the keeping of swine within the, limits of the town boundary, except by special authority of the Corporation. This by-law comes into force on and after tho Ist proximo.

An extraordinary general meeting of the shareholders of the Manchester Union Hall Coirpany (limited) will be hold at tho Swan Hotd, Wharf street, on the evening of Ist September, at half-past seven o'clock. Wo perceive that the Directors call for applications from persons willing to rent the Hotel attached to tho Hall. Such applications will be received up to eight p.m. on lsfe September next.

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Bibliographic details

West Coast Times. FRIDAY, AUGUST 28, 1868., West Coast Times, Issue 915, 28 August 1868

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West Coast Times. FRIDAY, AUGUST 28, 1868. West Coast Times, Issue 915, 28 August 1868

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