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MAORI REPRE ENTATION.

ELECTION AT THE BAY OF ISLANDS.

FIBST ELECJION OF MAORI ttTPRESEHTATIVES FOB TUE GHNERAL ASSEMBLY. We extract from the " Wanganui Times" the following report of the nomination of a Maori Representative from the " Western Maori Electoral District," which took place at Wanganui on the 17th ultimo. From eighty to a hundred natives were present, many of whom seemed much amused by the novelty of the proceedings. Robert Parris, Esq., Returning Officer for the Western Maori Electoral I)istrict, having read the writ, and explained the mode of procedure, called upon the electors to nominate a fit and proper person to represent them in the Colonial Parliament. Captain Kemp, of <he Native Contingent came forward to propose Meti Kingi, and said to the assembled natives — I, on behalf of the Wanganui, Ngatiapa, Rangitane, and Muaupoko tribes, beg to propose the chief, Mete Kingi Paetahi, as a representative for the people in the Parliament of New Zealand, that he may take his seat in that august assembly, within whose courts is the concentration of all law and wisdom. Ob tribes now present, Do not »uppoj?e tbg-t wo m called upoa

to elect a person to represent us in Parliament for the purpose of aggrandisement; don't think that this means you will acquire wealth in the shape of blankets, horses, sheep, cows, shirt and tobacco money, or any other kind of property ; and do not think that by this means the tribes will acquire increased influence and power, and thereby become very_ great- and exalted. No, the benefits conferred upon us will be of a different kind — first by a proper use of the privilege conferred upon us, the preservation of the Maori race will be secured ; secondly, laws for the protection of the persons and properties of the natives will be framed; and, thirdly, equal and just rights will be secured to us by proper machinery respecting our lands, whereby the same and the wealth derived therefrom will be permanently secured to us. It is the law to which we r.rast look for protection, for it will ever cast its protecting shield over those that yield willingly obedience to its precepts. This is only a commencement of the good work, which will attain to further development in the future!

Pehimana (who seconded the motion) said— The person upon whom our choice has fallen to represent us in the Parliament of New Zealand is Mete Kingi, who will aid in framing laws for the benefit of the native population. Now, for the first time, do wo believe that the salvation of the native race will be secured by allowing them to have a representative inP arliament.

There being no other candidato proposed, Mete Kingi was declared to be duly elected by the Returning Officer. Mete Kingi then briefly returned thanks for the confidence reposed in him by the tribes : said it was not an honor sought after by himself, but he yielded to the wishes of the people, who, he trusted, would never have occasion to regret the choice they had made by anything lie might do or say in the future.

Three cheers were then given for the representative, three for the Queen, three for the Returning Officer, and three for Major Durie: and after a few complimentary remarks by the Returning Officer and his deputy, Mr R. Woon, the meeting dispersed.

The following is a translation of a letter sent to Mr Parris as Returning Officer, in which the writer explains his reasons for being unable to attend the nomination, and suggests tihat it would be better for the choice of the member to be made by the Europeans rather than by the natives themselves : — " Tahurangatira, Waiuku, " April 2, 1868. "To Mr Parris — Friend, salutations ; your letter has arrived, asking for two persons to go to the meeting (at Wangarnii). Ifc is right. If I were a person who could go well in a ship, but as I cannot O parent, it is right that some persons should go and see the work of voting, viz., the meeting (for the nomination).

" This is a word of mine to you, that although my body does not go my letter will go instead, and you will speak out my word that the meeting may hear, and that you and the electors may select. I am aware there are not many Waikato chiefs left, on the Queen's side, they are mostly gone to the King's side. We only — Ahepene Kaihau — and my companions are Te Raihi, Retamana Whakaete, Hori Tauroa, Te Hakariwhi, Taniehana Tunui, Hone te One, Nini Kukutai, W. te Wheoro, Honana Maioha, Hakopa Kotuku, Hetaraka Wetini, Mahikai.

" These are the principal chiefs of Waikato who remained loyal. This is our word tojtou. We are willing that one of us of Waikato should be appointed to carry out the arrangements of the Assembly. We agree to this work, for the members to be elected at once, that a clear understanding be quick arrived at between the two races — the Europeans and Maoris, because O friend Mr Parris, we are searching for some guidance for us the Maoris. The Europeans understand the laws. The Maoris are an ignorant people, and do not know how to carry out the requirements of the law, which I wish to see enforced and that Maori customs should cease and be subject to the law, which should guide the two races, that there be one law only — to work out rightly all matters and deliberately consider all good proposals, so that the thoughts of the two people may quietly settle down to work out good and peaceful arrangements. This is my word to you O parent, Mr Parris. I cannot go to see you and hear the news, but it is for you to write me a letter by the mail toMr Melsop, R.M., (Waiuku) that I may know the result of the work of the meeting.

"This is a question of mine to you. What is the reason that you leave it for the Maoris to select, viz., to appoint the person? Do you not know that the Maoris are a jealous peoplel?" O friend do you hear, the Ngapuhi do not like this word, but would, rather that the Europeans should appoint a person, which would be better.

" The Ngatiwhatua think the same, and are not satisfied ; but we the people of Waikato arc w'Uing to search for the root of that which is good. O friend, Mr Parris, I am willing for you to make public my word to the meeting, for you and them to see nnd quietly turn over the proposals. Finished. "Fr.«m your loving friond, " AtHEPENE KaIJIAU."

Oil tho loth. April, the election of a member for the Northern district, in the House o J ' Representatives, under the "A'ative Representation Act, 1866," took place at the residence of Mr Barslow, liesident Magistrate, Russell. Although this was the first election of the kind in the history of the Colony, the natives evinced extremely little interest in the matter. A half-caste (Mr Frederick Neno Russell, of Russell, Bay of Islands), was proposed and seconded by two natives, and elected without opposition. The new member has received a good education, and on the mother's side is related to the famous old chief, Tamati Waka None. — " Jtfew Zealand Herald." ELECTION AT KAIPOI. The nomination of candidates to represent the Southern Maori interest took place at St. Stephens', to the left of the pa near Wooden^. The attendance of visitors was small, but there were between eighty and one hundred Maoris, besides women and children. About halfpast twelve Mr Mackay opened the proceedings of the day by explaining the formula of tho election. He read the notice in the "Gazette" and tho writ for the election, and then called on the natives to nominate their candidatea. George Peter Matu stepped forward and proposed Thomas Green, a half-caste, as a fit and proper person to represent the Southern j Maori electoral district. His nomination was seconded by llopa Paura. Ihaia Tamui proposed George Peter Matu as a ! fit and pvopov p<wa ; bufc h.p (JppUncd to

stand. Peti te Hori proposed Wi Nahera. Henare Makaika seconded the nomination. The Rev. Te Loi proposed Paratene Tamanui a Rangi, and Hoani Ura seconded the nomination. No other proposal being made, a show of hands was taken as follows : — Wi Nahera, 35 ; Green, 28 ; Paratene, 10. A poll was demanded by Green, which takes place on the sth of May. The poll will be declared in June. — " Press," April 16.

ELECTION IN HAWKES* BAT.

The first election in this district under the Act conferring special representation on the Maori people took place on Wednesday last in front of the Government Buildings. There was a large attendance of the newly-enfranchised race. Two candidates — Karaitina and Tareha — were proposed and seconded in the usual style of Maori eloquence ; and the latter individual was declared to be the successful aspirant to legislative honors on the show of hands, by a majority of one. No poll was demanded, which was much theliest course, as it confined the proceedings to a single day. — " Hawke's Bay Times," April 20.

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Bibliographic details

MAORI REPRE ENTATION. ELECTION AT THE BAY OF ISLANDS., West Coast Times, Issue 839, 1 June 1868

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MAORI REPRE ENTATION. ELECTION AT THE BAY OF ISLANDS. West Coast Times, Issue 839, 1 June 1868

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