Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
This article displays in one automatically-generated column. View the full page to see article in its original form.

REPRESENTATION OF WESTLAND

DECLARATION OP FHE TOLL.

According to the intimation given, by the Returning Officer, the declaration of the poll taken for the election of a member to """""" represent W estland in 'he General Assembly, wns made yesterday in the Camp Reserve, Revell -street. If we may judge by the assemblage this event excited but little interest, for not more than seventy or eighty of the public were present. Mr Moor ho use and a number of his partizans attended, but Mr Shaw absented himself. A short time after noon, Mr Sale, the Returning Officer, appeared, and after briefly alluding to the occasion which called them together, announced the result of the polling on Friday last to be, for Mr Moorhouse 202 votes, for Mr Shaw 162. There was therefore a majority of* 40 in favor of the former gentleman, who was declared well and duly elected. Mr Sale concluded by stating the election to be at an end, and said he should be happy to hear any gentleman address the meeting who desired to do so. Mr Moorhquse responded to the invitation in a short speech in which he thanked , the electors of Westland for the honor of ' placing him in the Assembly as their representative. He, however, trusted they . would not expect too much from him as he had no intention of setting anything on fire, but declared he intended to do his best for the district. He alluded to the fact of his being a resident of Eastland, ' and said that some might consider it a disadvantage to this community; he, however, did not think so, and as the telegraph line was completed, no reason could exist why they should not be in constant communication with each other. Touching upon the present prosperity of Westland, he said it afforded him the greatest gratification to witness the progress that had been made in bo snort a time, and considered it was a sure sign of the prosperity of the people, who certainly had discovered great energy and industry. They had already become most important, and he considered that local governments should be established, and Christchurch to a certain extent thus relieved of responsibility, which at present was no slight burden to her. Mr Moorhouse fully concurred in the necessity X which existed of opening up, the country by cutting tracks and other local works, hut affirmed that it was not in the Assembly the battle would be fought to decide whether such works should be carried out or not, but in the Provincial Council ; and he therefore earnestly urged upon the electors the advisability of choosing five good men to represent them, and not be led away by senseless adventurers of no repute whatsoever, and who would be certain to have no weight or influence in the House. He believed there were too many of such ignoramuses to be met with, aud, whilst apologising for the liberty he was taking in offering advice, hoped such , men would be avoided. Were really efficient men sent down — men whose principles would find favor with the Christchurch comrviunity — he felt sured they would be warmly received, and had not the slightest doubt that the Superintendent, whoever he f might be, would elect one of them to sit in 1 the Executive ; and with such men in such a position to represent her, Westland would virtually govevn Uevself.. He felt much gratified in being the elected of Westland, for he believed he should soon be in a position to render her great service, as his friends on the other side assured . him that his return as Superintendent was almost certain. Regarding Separation, the speaker declared himself not only opposed to the movement, but that he was a firm believer in the integrity of the proviuce, which he should be sorry to see disunited. At the same time he considered that the administration of all parts of it should be equitably conducted, and no more favor shown to East than to West Canterbury. If, however, they could not agree, and he • found that Westland was Buffering injustice, the community of that district might be sure that he should be one of the first *. to advocate Separation, as such a proceedfTing would be most desirable if an equitable adjustment of financial matters coutd not be arrived at. Still he declined making any distinct promises on any particular subject, . as there was no, telling what might occur, but again declared that he should do all he could to introduce that reform he found . was so much desired. In conclusion, he • again gave thanks for his return, and hoped that not one who had voted for him would ever have occasion to regret having done so. (Cheers.) On the motion of Mr Eicke, three cheers were given for the Returning Officer ; and thus terminated the first election in Weatlandfor the General Assembly.

This article text was automatically generated and may include errors. View the full page to see article in its original form.
Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/WCT18660321.2.7

Bibliographic details

REPRESENTATION OF WESTLAND, West Coast Times, Issue 158, 21 March 1866

Word Count
817

REPRESENTATION OF WESTLAND West Coast Times, Issue 158, 21 March 1866

Working