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SPORTING.

THE DERBY

GRAND PARADE'S SURPRISE

A GREAT ASSEMBLAGE

London papers to hand bring full details oi" Derby Day at Epsom on June 4. It is estimated that the attendance broke all previous records and the scene on the historic downs, was one to be treasured in memory. Nothing like it has ever been seen at Epsom before. It was a scene which will live long in the memory of those who witnessed it. The company included thousands of colonials and Americans, and, indeed, people from South Africa and India and nearly all the civilised countries in the world. The spell of grand weather experienced had unfortunately broken down on Wednesday, and the rain to some extent spoiled the spectacular part of the business. The light, too, was bad, and the moisture came too late to do any good to the course, which was not only abnormally hard, but terribly bad in other ways. The military occupation of the place had practically ruined the race track, for the time being, at any rate. Owners were afraid to run tneir horses, and for that reason the sport fell far below the standard we have been accustomed to associate with Epsom Derby week.

The King and Queen, Princess Mary, the Prince of Wales, Prince Albert, the Duke of Connaught, Prince and Princess Arthur of Connaught, went by special train to Epsom. The Royal party received a great welcome on arrival at the course. When the King's colt Viceroy carried the Royal colours to victory in the Stewards' Stakes —the second race on the programme —the enthusiasm displayed was such as to stir up the assemblage to a Mgk pitch. When the numbers went up for the Derby it was found that the field for the classic race numbered 13 Sir Alexander Black's colt The Phanter held his position as favourite to the end; and it is generally held that he started one of the hottest favourites on record for the blue riband. One of the most pronounced surprises associated with the race was, however, to be recorded, and with the favourite counted out of the place-getters the day was a bad one for backers.

THE RACE

THE DERBY STAKES 0f.£6500, by subscription of £50 each, for three-year-olds (foals of 1916); colts 9st and fillies Bst 91b; nominator of the winner, £500; second horse, £400; third, £200. One mile and a-half. (231 entries.)

Lord Glaneley's br or blk c Grand Parade, by Orby—Grand Geraldine (Templeman) Major Waldorf Astor's b c Bucaan by Sunstar —Hamoaze (Brennan)

Sir Walter Gilbey's b or br c Paper Money, by Greenback — Epping Rose (S. Donoghue) 3

Also ran: White Heat, Dominion, Paper Money, The Panther, All Alone, Buchan, Coriolanus, Sir Douglas, Roamer, Grand Parade, Bay of Naples, Tangiers, Milton.

The Panther showed a deal of temper at the post, and he got off badly. Paper Money led from Loamer, White Heat, and Grand Parade, with The Panther.) fifth and Coriolanus last.. wAst ttt-e" field dashed round Tattenham Corner Paper Money was leading from. Grand Parade, Buchan, and Sir Douglas, while Tha Panther was nearly last. When close to home Grand Parade challenged Paper Money and Buchan, and wearing down his opponents he drew away and won an exciting race by half a length from Buchan, with Paper Money third, two lengths away. Sir Dougj las. was fourth, Tangiers fifth, and [The Panther ninth.

The result was not quite so sensational as when the 100 to 1 chances Jeddah/; Signorinetta, and Aboyeur won!, butthe success of Grand Parade was not for a moment contemplated, even ,by-the owner and trainer, as much more faith was at the eleventh hour reposed in his stable companion Dominion. The glorious uncertainty of.rn-'-- thus received another striking exemplification. The most astonishing thing about the race was the utter collapse of the Two Thousand Guineas winner The Panther. This colt had, by his owner and friends, been backed net only in England, but in South Africa, and even India, to win a sum which was variously estimated as between £70, 000. and £100,000. He had been landed to the skies, not only in the press, but in every place wuere sporting men congregate. He was, indeed regarded as an unbeatable proposition, because he was certainly one of the handsomest speciments of the thoroughbred seen in late years. It was said that he would strip a 101b better horse than he did on the Two Thousand G.uineas day, «<nd as he would be practically meeting the same horses he had beaten before, it did not seem feasible that he must, under more favourable circumstances triumph over them again. Such an ignominious failure as his is not often recorded in connection with a big race. It was a case of "how are the mighty fallen" with a vengeance.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/WC19190725.2.53.1

Bibliographic details

SPORTING., Wanganui Chronicle, Volume LXXIV, Issue 17626, 25 July 1919

Word Count
801

SPORTING. Wanganui Chronicle, Volume LXXIV, Issue 17626, 25 July 1919

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