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TURF JOTTINGS.

The Panther is a hot favourite for the English Derby (run next Wednesday) next in demand being Buchan, Stefan the Great, Lord Basil, and Paper Money.

Gloaming's yearling sister, who is one of J. Scobie's team, is to race us Refraction in Australia.

It is stated that the price paid oy Mr. W. R. Kemball for the Victorian steeplectiaser, Negambo, was something over £500. F. McNamara's winning fee —as provided by the rules—for the Doncaster Handicap was £106/7/-, and for the Sydney Cup £206/19/-, but it is probable that in each rase a present from the owner swelled the total.

The following is the value to the owners of the respective winners of the five most valuable races run on the first two days of the A.J.C. Autumn meeting: St. Leger (Finmark), £1484; Doncaster Handicap (Hem), £2147; Sires' Produce Stakes (Millieme), £3119; Champagne Stakes (Bigaroon), £2227; and Sydney Cup (lan Or), £4159.

It was not in Mr. R. Sievier's ownership that Royal Bucks won the Lincolnshire Handicap and City and Suburban. Less than a fortnight prior to the running of the first-men-tioned race Royal Bucks was bought by .the Marchioness of Queensbury, but remained with Sievier's other horses at Newmarket.

*;The one yearling bought In Melbourne and the two in Sydney, on behalf of Mr. G. D. Greenwood, have been given to J. Burton to train at Randwick. They are: Varco —Faraway (dam of Dick Meagher) colt, 350g5.; Cooltrim —Quietist filly, 200 gs.; and The Welkin —Carissima filly, 430gs. At latest Rossini (Cheimbini's brother), for whom Mr. G. D. Greenwood gave 1025g5. as a yearling, was doing sound work at Riccarton (Christchurch), and it is probable he will bo among the runners for next year's A.J.C. Derby. It may be almost too much for Messrs. Mason and Greenwood to pull off three A.J.C. Derbies in succession, but so far no Austra-lian-trained colt or filly stands out as the probable winner of Randwick's rich three-year-old race, says an Australian writer.

Geldings filled the three places in the Sydney Cup. This season geldings have been going strongly in Sydney and Melbourne, their wins, in addition to the Sydney Cup, including the A.J.C. Derby and Craven Plate (Gloaming), Melbourne Cup (Night Watch), and A.J.C. Summer Cup and Anniversary Handicap (Arch Marella). Some followers of racing may deplore the fact of such, successful performers being unsexea, but they should not lose sight of the fact that if the horses mentioned had been allowed to remain entire, thsy might not have attained anything approaching the same turf prominence. Night Watch was entire when he raced as a two-year-old, but was subsequently gelded.

The winner of the Champagne Stakes at -the A.J.C. meeting, Bigaroon, who is still owned by Mr. E. J. Watt, but is raced on lease by Mr. "Constable," cost the former 600gs. as a yearling. In the Spring he was one of the first of the Randwicktrained two-year-olds to be selected as the probable winner of the Breeders' Plate, but owing to one of the ailments to which any youngster is subject, was not a runner for that race. He was spelled, and did not run until he won a division of a Maiden Nursery at Rosehill at the end of March. This he followed up with another win the following Aveek at the same track, and his record stands at three wins for a similar number of starts. Bigaroon is by Beragoon from Marasca (Malster —Mangosteen), Avho raced at lavo and three years for one win. She was sent to the stud as a four-year-old, her first filly foal being by Bronzino.

On the opening day of the A.J.C. meeting backers commenced Avell, the Hurdle Race favourite. Lord Nagar, winning practically from start to finish. He was leading from Sweet Step and Gladfui passing the stand the first time, and the latter was the only runner to subsequently give the favourite's backers any cause for anxiety. However, a faulty jump at the half-mile caused the New Zealander to lose ground, and from that out Lord Nagar had matters all his own way. Always a good horse in heavy going—he won a Villiers Stakes under those conditions —he jumps splendidly. He is still trained by J. Finn for the Rajah of Pudukota, in whose colours he has won three races. Gladfui and Mountwood had a great tussle for second place, the latter, who gained ground down the straight, acquitting himself excel lently.

Discussing the race for the A.J.C. St. Leger, an Australian writer states that notwithstanding that form did not give anything a chance against

I Finmark, there were eight runners for the St. Leger. It may have been a good sporting spirit that brought about such a large field, but somehow I think the liberality of the second and third money had a deal to do with it. There was just the possibility of Finmark being off. Golden Bronze was the only one of Finmark's opponents that appeared to have the slightest chance of beating him. Finmark opened at odds on, but rumour was so persistent as to his soreness that at one stage he eased to even money. In a slow preliminary he moved in cramped fashion, but was first to show out when the barrier rose. At the stand he was joined by Khublai Khan, with Queen's Guard and Aranap next. Along the back Finmark and Khublai Khan were still together, but at the five" furlongs the former commenced to go away, and at the straight entrance had increased his lead to six lengths from Khublai Khan and Aranap, with Golden Bronze next. From this out Finmark went further away, and the only interest attaching to the race was the fight going on for second place. Khublai Khan shook off Aranap, and Carbern, coming on, beat the latter for third in the last few strides. Finmark simply walked away with the race, but, with the opposition so weak, that was only to be expected.

Mr. W. Allison (Special Commissioner of the London "Sportsman; is of opinion that tubed horses should not be allowed to run in races any more than doped horses. He says: "That racing is for the benefit !of horse-breeding is now ' fully accepted, even by the enemies of sport pure and simple; but if roaring is hereditary, it cannot be for the benejit of horse-breeding that an animal labouring under such an infirmity should be enabled by an operation to gain a spurious reputation. Personally, I attach little importance to the supposed hereditary character of roaring; but that is not what the recognised authorities say, nor is it what the foreigners say when you are offering them a stallion for sale. ■It may, of course, be contended that in any case a 'tubed' gelding can do no harm, which is true in a sense: but I think that the operation should be just as much taboo as doping. My suggestion is that tubing should be forbidden, so far as racing is concerned. All the same, I once bought a tubed mare by Trenton out of Crown Jewel. Her name was Trinket. She was sold to Australia, and the hole in her windpipe had grown up before she reached that country. There also went out Bright Steel, by St. Simou out of Glare, whose trainer, Mackie, did not let him show on a racecourse in this country, because he had cost a lot of money and his respiratory organs were, to say the least, under suspicion. Trinket was mated with Bright Steel, and he got a Melbourne Cup winner (Westcourt) out of her. So much for hereditary roaring."

! Received May 30, 9.10 p.m. SYDNEY, May 30. The Newcastle Cup race meeting has been postpon ". till Wednesday owing to the rain.

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Bibliographic details

TURF JOTTINGS., Wanganui Chronicle, Volume LXVI, Issue 17585, 31 May 1919

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TURF JOTTINGS. Wanganui Chronicle, Volume LXVI, Issue 17585, 31 May 1919

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