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THE RACE.

(By Tod Sloan jn the '■■*' Express.")

' Tagalie, -a gi'ey maro who looks more 'JJikt, a greyhound than a racehorse, rid--5 den by my friend, a-nd <Jountryman, 1 John Reiff, wqn. the Derby yesterday. ' ,I'm sure no Derby-has ever been won ' more easily; indeed, I've seldom seen * a raco where the winner was go little ' troubled. She won it coming up the hill and after passing Tottenham Oor- ; ncr, where Reiff took a pull to steady ' toer, and she came home in a canter. Second to her was Jaeger, the.handsomest horse I,have ever seen, and one | that I believe is going to do great ! things. ' The King's colt, Pintadeau, a horse that greatly tpok my fancy, Tan a great V race with Tracery for third place. Tho English Derby brings all sorts of memories to my mind, and I'm afraid \ they are not all pleasant. I never wop it, though I nearly stole k it once on Disguise ll.—a horse who ' could not get beyond six furlongs, and ' yet managed to finish third to Diamond * ! Jubilee. I ought to have won it on * i Holoeauste. I know the number of ' i horses that "ought to have won" when * j they didn't can lie counted in thousands, ; but if there's one thing I ever was sure ' of it is that Holoeauste -had the beating I of Flying Fox when he broke'his fetlock 1 after crossing the tan just before Tat--1 tenham Corner. 1 Still, I never won your greatest race, though I would have given my, eyes to have. The next best thing to having a thing yourself is to see your friends have it, and I couldn't have wished for anything better than to see * John Reiff win on Tagalie. When I was riding winners h«re in 1899 Reiff came over from the States \ as a very small :<boy. who oould go to scale at 4st 41bs., and I remember he ' lised to be idolised by all the ladies. Ho rode his first winner On—l think— a mare ofSir Waldie Griffith's. Now he is carrying all before him in France, and Tagalie is his second Derby win--1 nei1, for he came over from France | to ride Orby for Mr. Croker in 1907. j It reaUy, -made me feel good to be f walking fotmd the paddock at Epsom . i yesterday. The only wish I had was i tha^ I had the^ .coloutb. oii,; u and was i having another try to :win?^^> '* Derby. i After inspecting the horses and aeel ing tho race, I'-eame to the conclusion that your three-year-olda are not as good as '*hey are in France, and ias for some of your jockeys 7 riding yester- i day —well, they-are a shame to Eng- j land. a■■■-•> TJie first candidate I saw in the padordock ' was Jaeger. I have seen a few '.racehorses in the last fifteen years, but I havo never seen a better looking one than this. Though he failed yesterday, i he'll "win big racfes yet. | After Jaege>r I saw Tagalie. She's a , . • Kfifhtly-framed mare that doesn't take the eye, but with the advantage of a fino horseman like-Reiff, I had to add : hem-to my list of "likelies." j -Then I saw Sweeper Il.y the favourite. Ho did not strike me as turned out any-trio-well. They kept him mov- | ing so much in the paddock with the [ crowds after him. that it -reminded me • b{ the itory of'the tribe of Indians ( chasing, a single cowboy. " | Tho King's horse, Pintadeau. I also liked very* much, and he ought to have troubled the winner at the finish. I i There was a long delay at the post-, .•and. :,,laeger. was very troublesome. ! 1 Tagali^ got ;away; well in front when ' tho tapes went up, and Reiff, with his ;<vusfcomary. Cj?nfulenee—-a quality seldom j shown by ■joQ'keys in big races—was content to ride a waiting race I —in front, j I suppose nothing will ever break down ■■•' thai prejudice -among English jockeys against waiting in front. j "Reiff kept Tagalie Well in front coming up the hill^ with Jingling Geordie. Tracery, and Sweeper 11. nearest to . her, , He. . c neYe>r, took the slightest ■ ..libe Hty; \ sbut,' pbilied Tagalie steadily along, always keeping a safe distance ahead. They ran thus up the hill, the /procession gradually lengthening out, j \<sv there were, horses in the race that ought to bo in selling plates instead of

tho Derby. Tagalie sailed along easily over the hiU/'<and it was obvious that sho had tho raco won then. She came round Tottenham Corner with the most perfect case, and as they rounded the corner Reiff, slowed her down to nearly a walk. Tho others slowed down, too, iind this gave Tagalie the chance of a "breather." -Then ReifF shot tlie grey mare out. and nothing could live with her. Hardly a man in the crowd shouted *mv namo but hers. A few who had backed Sweeper 11. called his name, but at no place* in the race did \e cvor appear to hold ii winning chance.1 It seemed for a &econd; as.if the King's horso was going to-fight out a finish with Tagaiie, but the moment Reiff sent her.out to win. the raco wp.s all over. Jaager, going well, came in four lengths, behind her, and" Pintad«iu and Tracery battled for third place. And now I woulid like, to say a word about tho jockeyship in the race. 1 have said it was a disgrace to England ;. it would be a disgrace ta any country. It surely ig a reflection bn_ the horselrranship of Englishmen that eight of the twenty jockeys riding in the l)erby shou,ld be either American, French, or Colonial. I can't imagine anything worse than the horsemanship of the English boys yesterday-, There were some of them t "wouldn't a.llow to ride exercise at the racing stables, more of them ought to be the chef's' jjssistants in the kitchen of a restaurant. " J It isn't only that they have no skill, Imt .they b&ve- nq ; ITbey Care afraid l to i^^e; ; An/»t>e^nihe,.afraid to iake 4he jsiigfcfcast Tisk. They just -jog alorig >ifrs %fagt^traTf &Hj^.fafai t *C.'^-\:-.-: ' c F«wi3p4Bm(^UMM^<init^^s*Mtcuiir-(-o. i >t Io ; 'F*anoe Jfio^fitig^fjW I'a^Twrtiife 'jtfo-nin-

thirty times in the course of a season. If a colt, runs ■■in-half a score of races in this country, everybody says he is beina; overdone. , .■■;>■■-.-■■"■.■■ ■■-■ : '.". ~ AJV this vCO^Kf^c'of jockeys and i coddling of-horses-.is'hot doing English tacipg am good/; -t^ think' \pna' have * gooff SeM to l«flirn" from tfrd Frenclr triethods, where the jockeys have to do real fighting if they want to win a race, and the horses st>end their days on the course instead of in the stables.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/WC19120723.2.53

Bibliographic details

THE RACE., Wanganui Chronicle, Issue 12856, 23 July 1912

Word Count
1,117

THE RACE. Wanganui Chronicle, Issue 12856, 23 July 1912

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