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SUCCESS OF N.Z. JOCKEYS.

(United Press As6ociation.--Copynght.)

MELBOURNE, September 4. New Zealand jockeys filled the three first places in the Warriston Welter. Gray rode Silver Bullet. Cairns Idealist, and Browne Camballo. (By " Multiform.") The Marton Spring meeting begins to-morrow a.ad will bo continued on Thursday.. The rields are large, and every thing points to a most successful ■gathering. According to a Is apier, writer, the New Zealand Cup candidate Fort William has made a complete recovery from the effects ■of the accident which befel him some time ago, and is now going en the right way. It is said that he is likely to be placed in charge of a Hawke's.Bay trainer; The New South Tvalea trainer, I. Earrishaw, who is nt present on ■ a visit to England, journeyed to Welbeck, the Dulcn of Portland's estate, an order to have a look at good old Carbine. In recounting his inspection to a Sydney, paper, Earnshaw bears teßtimony that Musket's greatest,' son is carrying his 26 years remarkably well.' Lhdy Lucy was given a run at the recent* Y.R.C. meeting, the daughter of Soaton Dclaval starting in the August Handicap, run over a mile and a half. She .fijTured at an outsido price in th* betting . and finished absolutely last. Lfidy TiUf.v was stated to bo somewhat bjickivprd in condition. At the same meeting Obsono and Sharpshooter were also 'seV»n under silk, but" neither ran forward. On S-itui'day last, whilst tho steeplechaser Prosyector, by Gold T! ?cf— Dazzle, was being given a gallop on tho Clifden racecourse, lie suddenly dropped down dead. His owner, Mr. M. Himley, v>l\o was in the saddle at tho time, received a nasty fall, and for some time remained unconscious. Prospector at the time appeared to have totally recovered from his recent indisposition, jmd was galloping well. At one time Prospector was thought to be a champion, but lost his form. An- amusing incident in •connection with the Wairarapa Hunt Meeting occurred on Thursday afternoon (says the "New Zealand Times"). At the last moment Mr. S. Bishop; the t)wner of Prince Hassan, found himself without a

rider. Mr. .Bishop pressed his son, a diminutive boy of about 10 yoars of age, into the service. The lad, who weighs about sst, stepped on to the scales with a whole heap of paraphernalia in his arms to bring himself up to the required weight of 9.5. Some difficulty was experienced in finding the material necessary to raise tho lover, and, after a conference with the clerk of scales, Mr. Bishop ultimately gathered up two lxigs, a sack, a bundle of rags, several rubbers, two surcingles, a horse cover, and two pocket handkerchiefs. As a last resource a large piece of rope was requisitioned, which brought the weight up to the standard, much to the relief of Mr. Cooper, clerk of the scales. Some difficulty was met with in adjusting the impedimenta on Prince Hassan, but the difficulty was overoomo < by making a swag and fastening it in front of the saddle, which, needless to say, was a heavy one. The horse ran a good race, finishing close up fourth, and the rider was accorded a cheer on returning to tho enclosure. According to last '^advices received from Melbourne, the English - bred Sandbath ruled a warm favourite for tho Caulfield Cup. Prior to his transportation to tho Southern Hemisphere, Sandbath won four races in England; but so far his performances in Australia have been more of the third than tho first-rate order. He is, however, a highly-bred horse by Black Sand, a son of Melanion and grandson of Hermit, and possibly now that he has become thoroughly acclimatised, ho will bo able to extend the winning record of English-bred horses in Australia, the most, celebrated of which to date is that accomplished by Comedy King in the last Melbourne Cnp. Tho crack jockey W. H. McLachlan has arrived back in xiustralia from England. When interviewed he said when he left five months ago he intended to settle in England, but he found the climate too severe. " When I used to saddle up," he stated, " I was almost perished with cold, and to see me shaking you would think I had an attack of nerves. It was midsummer, too, and when people there commenced to complain of the heat, I quite made up my mind to pack up for Australia again." McLachlan has a high opinion of Maher and Wootton ; but outside of those two,

ho states, the riders were not nearly up to the average of Atistralian boys. ?tiaher, he states, is exceedingly clever in sprints and straight courses, while Wootton is a past-master in getting round curves. There is nobody in EngUmd to approach him in this respect, according to McLachlan.

Advices to hand from Napier credit Goldfindor with going on splendidly in his preparation for the New Zealand Cup. The brother to California is credited with being as sound as a bell of brass, so that it would appear to be safe to conclude that the unsoundness which sent him into retirement in the autumn has quite disappeared. The meeting of Swynford and Lemborg in the Eclnse Stakes at Sandown, Park on July 15 led to a deal of enthusiastic writing prior to the two

cracks measuring strides in the " ten-thousand-pounder" ; but the hollowness of the victory of ..the St. Leger winner *.pver the Derby victor caused the race to be referred to'us a very tame affair. Ono leadinj^tvritesr put the matter'thus: —" It was ■ Veritably a "case, of 'Eclipse' • with' Lemberg. There'is no other way' of describing his defeat. Swynford"outpaced him everywhere, and Wootton was sitting still and looking round at Dillon plying the whip on Lemberg in . despairing and "futile efforts to bridge1 the gap between the pair?: in the last quarter of a mile. Again some people vowed 'that wasn't Lemberg's form,', and said he must be off colour, as in some way he undoubtedly was when Swynford licked him at Newmarket; i but for my part I have no excuses to ] urge for him now, and only obstinat© j partisanship can refuse to admit the j superiority of. the winner. He would j beat Lemberg anywhere, over any j course, and at any distance. He has come on to an extent unrealised by many people until San down, though they must appreciate it now, whereas Lenjberg remains pretty much the horse he was in the autumn. That is the case in a nutshell." Lord Derby is clearly now in a position to claim the best horse at present on the English | turf with his home-bred son of John o' Gaimt and Canterbury Pilgrim. Swynford and Lemborg are both engaged in the Jockey Chib Stakes of lO.OOOsovs., which event comes up for decision at Newmarket on the 28th prox. - The race in question is run over the last mile and three-quarters of the Qesarewitch coursa. The running of that event will probably mark the close of the present season's racing for Swynford and Lemberg, and the event in which they may have their next meeting is the timehonoured Ascot Gold Cup, the distance of which extends to "two miles and a<lip.lf.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/WC19110905.2.3.4

Bibliographic details

SUCCESS OF N.Z. JOCKEYS., Wanganui Chronicle, Volume L, Issue 12798, 5 September 1911

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SUCCESS OF N.Z. JOCKEYS. Wanganui Chronicle, Volume L, Issue 12798, 5 September 1911

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