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BY "MULTIFORM."

Concluding day's races to-morrow :;.t WelJinjztbn.

TJiat the Hon. J. ,D. Ormond is convinced that A. Julian was innocent of the accusations made in connection with the Napper incident at Waniisttmi is ]>orne out by the fact that the Auckland horseman rode Bollin in the Winter Hurdles at Wellington.

Provocation is a slightly hotter favourite than Gold Thread for the Winter Cup, for which Electrakoff, Boanerges. Nyland, and Dreadles* aro'als-o fancied. For the Grand National Steeplechase Corazon, Antarctic. ;mJ Dorando are the prime fancies, while for the Grand National Hurdle>, the favourites are Continuance NorthEast. St. Aidan and Centaur.'

'When tho latest mail vo hnnd left England tho Derby winnor Sunstar was able to do walking ex?!-?,'..-^, though both hLs fore-legs were su.TiL'if.ntly inflamed to suggest that it ivoul'l ].c sonio time before he could agn.in be treated to: fast work. His trnirer, however, was hopeful of having him right for: the St. Leger in September. As usual after many Derbies., the winner is now pronounced by many of the critics to bo merely -"the host of a Lad lot."

The well-known Australian horseman, W. MeLachlan, lost no time in getting t> work on his arrival in England, making an appearance at Hurst Park ou Monday, June 5. His first mount was on Mr. So] Joel's Poppy, who ran nowhere in a two-year-old selling plate. The same day ho Avas second on Mr. W. Clarke's Feramorz in the Whitsuntide Plate, 1 mile, won by Pietri. The latter, ridden by Maher, was at 11 to 10 on, but it was only after a terrific tussle over the last quarter-mile ho beat Feramorz by n head. Considering tho second horse's form was many pounds better than at his previous appearance, it was surprising that some of the critics took exception to his defeat. But such was the case, which caused a writer in tho "Pink 'Un" to remark: —"I* am stirptised to sco several writers criticise AlcLachlan's riding. I thought Ins horsemanship was masterly. In negotiating the bend he did not lose an inch of ground and Fcrainorz in his hamis ran a 191b. better horse than he did in tho Esher Ctip at Sandown Ht- was only beaten the shortest of heads, and there v.ns some talk of an objection, but McLachlan told Mr. Clark there was no ground for one. Tho better horse won." On the second day of tho Hurst Park meeting a third was the result of McLaehlan's two mounts, and on tho opening day of the Manchester meeting he' was on Eudorus, who finished second in the Castle Irvvell Handicap, and also had a couple of unplaced rides It -was on tho second day of the Manchester fixture that McLaclilan scored his first win, getting home on Mr. W. Clarke's Wildrake, who was favourite :\t 2 to 1 for tho Broughton Welter Handicap. He shot Wildrake to the ''rout immediately, af■jp.r tho start, anfl the result was not after in • doubt. McLachlan was unplaced, ths same afternoon on Gilgandra, who shared favouritism with Protestant Boy for th" Hridgewater Handicap. From the above it will bt 1 y.non that one win was the result of tho Sydney jockey's first four days' riding in England,' but with the conditions somewhat different to what ho was accustomed in Australia, it was scarcely to bo expected ho would be seen at his best during his opening moplc. Most of McLaehlan's mounts woro on horsos trained by J. R. Brewer, and no doubt he will do most of the middle-weight riding for the latter's stable during the remainder of Iho season.

In its Derby notes, the London "Daily Mail sayr, Sur.star was lustily cheered when Mr. Jack .Tool weyt out xv lead him in Mrl Joel had never done this with any of his previous winners, not even Your Majesty m tho Sr- Lcger, and the report was put about that he did not intend making an exception of Sunstar, but would leave tho honour to his trainer, Morton, as the man who was responsible for tho improvement and condition which made- the triumph possible. But this was incorrect. Mr. Joel appreciated to the full all the skill and labour which Morton devoted to Sunstar, h's unremitting attention right up to olio lost moment, and the fearful -inxiety which lie must have undergone, in common with every trainer of a Derby favourite. On the latter point Morton himself jocularly said lie "did not want another." But as to tho loading back..Sunstar, there is but one Derby, arid when, after the Two Thousand, Mr. Joel was asked whether, in tho event of Sunstar "winning at Epsom ho would forsake his usual practice and lead him in, ho replied, "1 should think 1 will." He could not, as remarked above, bo otherwise than pleased at the reception of tho result. Formeden, one of the horses brought over from New Zealand by It. J. Mason last week, is not to be raced, but is for solo for stud purposes. Ho was treated to a long spell after going wrong, but as there was a recurrence of the trouble shortly before his departure from N.Z.j it was decided not to further persevere with him. He is

a three-year-old brother to Boniform • Multiform—Otterdon) and as in addition to being a shapely horse he is

a winner, there should be no trouble

m selling him in Australia. Peirene another of the New Zealand trainer'; team, is a rather delicate filly, anc though she ran so well this season, hai given a lot of trouble. Perhaps * change of climate may benefit iher, V ice-Admiral (Multiform —Rattler) is i good cut of colt, and should stay, bui the yearlings Canute and Teviotdale dc not look as forward as many of thost trained at "Randwiok. Teviotdale., whe is by Achilles from Strathspey, takes |my fancy, but as he is a biggish colt and may require timo, ho may "not dc as well in the Spring as Canute. 11 depends principally upon the •* manner in which- the coits acquit themselves ia the two-year-old races at Randwicls whether Mr. Mason will go on to Melbourne for the Cup meeting, or return to New Zealand after the A.J.O. meeting. As to their actual merits he says he is somewhat in the dark, as they were, really not; called upon to show much before they came over. "It was different with Boniform and Armlet in thoir respective years," he added. "J did not arrive in Sydney until much later, and knew they could gallop a good three furlongs at least before I left New Zealand." While expressing surprise at the small prize-money at some of our meetings, Mr. Mason does not think the Totalisator would benefit the sporfc here—in fact, is of the opposite opinion. He not only thinks the machine has a tendency to lower the tone of racing, but is confident its installation would have a prejudicial effect upon our yearling sales. However, in view of the big prices realised by yearling.? in the Argentine, where speculation is confined to the Totalisator, ib is possible ho may be at fault on this particular point. Naturally, he touched upon racing in New Zealand, and it will interest Sjrdney sportsmen to know that he considers there are very few first-class • horses in the Dominion at the present time, one of fcho exceptions being Los Angelos.— Sydney "Referee." Speaking of the Hack Race won by the local horse Taft, the "N.Z. Times" says: —Varna and Taft were the popular fancies.. With so many runner? the starter was some time in getting them lined up, but when the tapes wont up Varna shot out. After going a furlong Taft supplanted .Mr. Whitney's gelding, and he was showing the way to a close-bunched field as they -swept into the straight. At the distance Kingsv/ell and Lady Mildred joined issue, but they could not trouble Mr. Jackson's gelding, who won very comfortably by ttvo lengths from Khi£rs« well, Lady Mildred being a length further back, with St. Gate fourth. Varna fell back in the straight, and when he returned to the enclosure it was seen that ho had broke a blood-vessel. Taft is a quick beginner, but has generally failed in the concluding stages of a race. Here he was going batter than anything at the finish, and has undoubtedly improved. Mr." Jackson hns had his full share of bad luck this season, so that the victory, for .the "stais and stripes" was well received. Kingswell was neglected on the tuacbine, and paid a much bigger dividend than the winner. Take it all round, it was one of the best afternoon's ?porl yt=t seen at Trentham.

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BY "MULTIFORM.", Wanganui Chronicle, Volume L, Issue 12779, 21 July 1911

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1,449

BY "MULTIFORM." Wanganui Chronicle, Volume L, Issue 12779, 21 July 1911

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