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BY "MULTIFORM."

Horowhenua Races to-day and tomorrow.

Roosevelt, looking somewhat on the big side, left for the above meeting yesterday morning.

I am glad to hear that Mr. R. Vivian is making a good recovery from his accident at the recent Hunt Club meeting.

Frank Wootton, the Australian rider, is overhauling Jockey Maher. who is now only ten wins, ahead of his rival. Frank appears to be the most popular of the two horsemen.

Entries for the Wanganui Guineas, 1911, and the Jackson Stakes, 1912, will be received by Mr. Wm. Hall, secretary of the Wanganui Jockey Club, up till 9.30 o'clock to-night.

Mr. Bidwill's colt Provocation is reported to have fully recovered from the mishap which befel him at Randwick last spring, and it is expected will sport silk at the C.J.C. Meeting in November next.

A prominent New Zealand trainer, who arrived in Sydney a few days ago, is of opinion that Paisano is the best hurdler seen in the Dominion for a very long time. Someone'suggested the possibility of The Reckoning beating Paisano at such a distance as two miles at level weights, but" after seeing the former, lie ' would not have that at all. Still, making full allowance for Paisano's recent good deeds, he would find The Reckoning a very tough opponent, list, each, at two miles.

. An action of interest to racing men. camo before the Rand High Court »a few weeks ago. It was one in which Thomas P. Johnson, an owner and trainer residing.in Johannesburg, sued Mr. Charles Marx, chairman of the Jockey Club of South Africa for £1000 damages in respect of the action of the club in warning him off. The plaintift also asked for reinstatement. The action of the, Jockey Club in warning plaintiff off was the result of the running of the mare Merry Widow, who ran at Turffontein (Johannesburg) at the races of the Johannesbuirg Turf. Club, was unplaced ■in a' five-furlong race on March 26, and won a race over five furlongs and a-half on March 28. The mare started at 7 to 4 against on the first occasion, and 10 to 1 against on the second. The plaintiff's explanation of the running of the horse was that the first day Merry Widow got a very poor start, and on the second a flying start. The animal had the same weight up on each occasion. Plaintiff said ho backed the mare for £210 on the first day and £10 oh the second. An enquiry was first held by the stewards on the course, and the plaintiff and the jockey, Ray, were suspended. The plaintiff was subsequently warned off by the Jockey Club. The plaintiff was the only one to give evidence on his own behalf, and Major F. J. Henley, secretary of the Johannesburg 'Turf Club, waw the only witness for the defence. The latter said that the betting return showed that Merry Widow had been backed oh March 28 (when the animal won) to win about £1300 at odds varying from 10 to 1 to 7 to 1. Plaintiff admitted that he had been before the stewards a few times in Australia. The case occupied two days in hearing, and his lordship (Mr. Justice Mason) delivered an exhaustive judgment, in which he said he could not accept the plaintiff's statement'that he did not know he had the right of appeal. He could not overlook the fact that Johnson had been brought before the stewards and dealt with for foul riding three years before, and that the procedure adopted was the same as upon tho last occasion. Under all the circumstances, the plaintiff was bound to fail in his action, and there must be judgment for defendant with costs.

The sensational battle for supremacy between Lemberg and Neil Gow in the decision of the Eclipse Stakes at Sandown ark is referred to as the Tace of the century. "The Scot," of the "Daily Mail," penned the following graphic account of the memorable struggle between the two three-year-olds:—" Lem-

berg slipped away a little quicker off the mark than Neil Gow, but it was evidently Ma hers intention 'to take plenty of time with Lord Rosebery's colt. He let liiiri swing along, the rider making no move at all to draw lnm nearer the other, even when Le.mberg vent from two to three lengths ahead of him, and then front three to four, j Lemberg was going well round the railway turn, just behind Salamis, but at the turn for home something happened v.-hich caused Dillon to adopt tactics he had not anticipated. Anyone in the same position would have been puzzled what course exactly to take. Lemberg does n.ot like galloping by himself, but ho had to for a moment or two, owing to the Kingsclere pacemaker going wide of tho turn. The consequence was that Lemberg, to my view, ran ungenerously for a. moment, and Dillon raised his whip, but Lemberg travelled bdtter vhen Mirador drew near. Meantime -Neil Gow had slipped into a place where he had a clear run. Below the distance Lemberg was going well, and it cJicl not seem as if Ned Gow would approach him. Here it was good odds on Lemberg. Then that wonderful galloping machine Neil Goav -was let out, and Maher began to assist v him. It was not an electric rush, but- simply that glorious action extended to its fullest, and <>]i !~the ground covered by each stride! He drew nearer the horse he had beaten in the Guineas, and—nearer still. Lemberg's stride seemed to shorten by comparison. Even here Dillon delayed using tho whip, and his reasonable hesit.nncy was somewhat unnecessarily misconstrued. A few more super-equine 'reach-outs' and Neil Gow drew level, and for 20 yards just headed the other, but Lemberg drew even again (we haci put down glasses and were holding breath). Which would do it? Level again! Then Lemberg again. Neil Gow for a moment at the distance had not run too straight, but there was not a suspicion of 'slanting' afterwards. Then, when only 20 yards from the post, they were together, and in another second were past the post—deadlevel. 'I don't suppose you want them to run again,' suggested 'Mr. Fairie' to Lord Rosebery after the race. \I don't think so,' was the response, and it was eventually arranged that the stakes should be divided."

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/WC19100902.2.3.3

Bibliographic details

BY "MULTIFORM.", Wanganui Chronicle, Volume L, Issue 12599, 2 September 1910

Word Count
1,064

BY "MULTIFORM." Wanganui Chronicle, Volume L, Issue 12599, 2 September 1910

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