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BY "MULTIFORM."

Nominations for all events for the Marten. Jockey Club's meeting ciose this evening at S o'clock.

Owners and trainers are again reminded that nominations for the Rangitikei Racing Club's annual meeting close with the Secretary, Mr. Goodall, cii Saturday, August 20th, at 9 p.m., at iha offices of the club, Bulls.

A yearling colt by Carbine's son Spearmint gave rise to .spirited competition ■when submitted to sale in England last month, and he went to loCOgs. Spearmint, who is at the stud in Ireland, is looked upon as a horse certain to bo a success.

A. Olliver has taken up his residence in Palmerston, says "Gerainf'j, and is staying at Awapuni with Geo. Price. It; is quite likely Olliver wjill leave for Sydney on Friday, but nothing definite has been decided, and in any enso ho Avill return to Palmerston North. It is also stated that W. Young intends to take up his residence at Rata, where Mr. H. MoManaway has bis private track, and M. King in charge of the horses.

It is reported that, old Kiatere made his last appearance on the racing track when ho competed in the Lincoln Steeplechase at Riccartbn on Saturday, as liis owner has announced his intention of pensioning him off. This is Kaitere's tenth season of racing. He has started altogether in some 16 races, and has won 15 races of a total value of over £3000. As he must have travelled close upon 100 miles in races alone he has certainly earned his retirement.

The Gisborne- sportsman Mr John Clark allowed a good jumper to slip through his fingers some two> years back when be sold To Arai for something like £27 10s. The man who secured tho son of Monaco has very good reason to regard the day with pleasurable feelings when Mr. Clark "elected to part with the bay gelding, for he has won nearly a dozen races with him in the interval, the stake money attaching to which is well on to £3000.

Among the thoroughbred stallions sold in Melbourne ion" Monday was Canteen, who is identical with the 1903 New Zealand Cup -winner of that name. He only realised 90gs., a very different pries to that paid for him by Sir Rupert Clarke after he ran third to .Gladsome and Emir in the Caul-field Stakes of 1901. Canteen was also third in the Eclispo Stakes at the same meeting, and as he did not look quite wound up at the time, the improvement he was expected to make caused him to advance to a short price for the Melbourne Cup of that year. However, ho eased again before the day, and was not ono of the first dozon to finish. Then he was going to win the Australian Cup, but be got very little closer to that than-he did the Melbourne Cup, and tho nearest he ever went to winning a, race for Sir Rupert Clarke was when he ran Nightfall to a Itead in the Squatters' Handicap at Ranxhvick.

Details now to hand bearing on the race for the Grand Prix de Paris showthat tho English Derby winner Lember«: st.ut?d a Vic-t favourite for ih-3 great French race. "Robin Hood" writes as follows anent the Grand Prix: —lt was a popular opinion all along the line in England that Lemberg had a great chanco of winning the" prize for Mr. Fairie. Tlie only doubt seemed to lie in the fact that the son of Cyllene had never proved his ability to stay a mile and Rev-en furlongs—the distance over which the race was run. Even if Lemberg failed in that point,however, hopes of a victory for this country still seemed fairly bright, for in Mr. A. Cunliffe's Charles O'Malley—who ran third in .the Derby, and subsequently showed himself to be a real stayer at Ascot—we appeared to have another candidate who would prove too giond for his French rivals. The uncertainty of racing was exemplified in a very striking manner, however, for both tho English champions failed to finish in tho first three._ raid it was left to the only other candidate froni this side—a complete outsider, in Mr. J. Rothschild's Bronzino—to retrieve honours to some extent by gainins; third place. The course was, unfortunately, in a terribly heavy statr\ being almrst like a. quagmire in several places, and it seems certain that this was tho s-010 cans" of Lemerg's defeat. Mr. F'nrie's colt was leading half a mile from home, with Charles O'Malley next, hut bp.low the distance both held -out signals of distress, and were passed by Nua~P. The last-named had tho issue at lr's mercy from tin's point, and won easily by three lengths. Nuage, who started '.second favourite, is evidently a. good colt, but the form was undoubtedly nothing like correct. This was fully proved by tho fact that Bronzino finished third.'for the colt, running in England had shown him to be a long way removed from the- front rank.

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Bibliographic details

BY "MULTIFORM.", Wanganui Chronicle, Volume L, Issue 12588, 19 August 1910

Word Count
830

BY "MULTIFORM." Wanganui Chronicle, Volume L, Issue 12588, 19 August 1910

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