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NOTES BY "MULTIFORM."

It is quite on the cards that Naumai will be sent to Australia in the near future. Indian advices mention that Soultline and Tangaroa are to be sent to England to race. King Edward's horse Minoru has wintered well, and his trainer is not without hope of seeing him down Bayardo in the Ascot Gold Cup. Marsh has confidence in the Derby winner as a stayer, notwithstanding that most racing men have a different idea. With the exception of .Mir.oru, all the coJts leased by his Majesty from Mr. W. Hall Walker have been returned to the latter.

Walter Raynor has got Research in work again after a short spell. The Renown gelding went lame behind, necessitating his being blistered, but he appears quite sound again and is nominated for the forthcoming Feilding meeting. Walter informs nic that he has several youngsters coming in shortly, and with the five already m work, should have a strong team for the winter and spring gatherings.

At a race meeting held down the line recently, things were very sultry in one race in particular. A well-known trainer, who is noted for getting up "benefits" is said to have had things fixed up fairly serene in one race. Not only were several of the horses in the "bag," but rumour says the starter also took part in the dividend, and shared largely, and allowed the winner to get such a "fly" at the barrier, that the raco was never in. doubt. If things like this are allowed to go on, the sooner the stipendiary steward is appointed for all clubs the better.

A story is told of a once well-known plunger on the English racecourse. In his early days he was down on his luck, and at this time every day he would send ''sure things" to a friend of his to back. Day atter day the friend always sent .some kind rof excuse: '' Received your telegram tod late," "Didn't back thjs one; JV4Had only a couple or. pins on that one," or something .like that. The plunger became disgusted at these answers from the moneyed friend. Ho knew the friend was backing his tips, and should have made a ton of money. Then the tipster decided to get even. That evening he sat down and picked out thie horse he thought had the least chance to-win. He knew it would ■be as gqod as 100 to 1, 'jut he was mad, and decided to teach his friend a lesson, so lie wired the tip, and also ; the advice "to go heavy on this one." The tipster smiled when he heard the bookies offering long odds against taa horse that he had wired, and could hardly confine his mirth. But his mirth was of short duration, for the 50 to 1 chsuice Avon. Ho gave up in disgust. The noxt day he received a. cheque for £100 from his friend, and thereafter wondered at the ways of Dame Fortune at the race track. This is said to be a I true story. The tipster himself does not deny it, but he will make no comment on it.

When a jockey palpably throws a race away his backers rarely go beyond" men tally wishing him all sorts of bad luck. It is different in France, as there pun ters loudly voice their disgust when a jockey does-not ride as they reckon he should. At Auteuil (near Paris) recently, a jockey named E. Pratt was riding M. James Hennessy's horse Cappeillo in the Prix de la Pepiniere, and a\ hen he had -"the race as good as won took matters so easily that, before he could get the favourite going again, Sophora, with a .sharp run, beat him a head en the post. The public called Pratt everything, and as ohe vocabulary of a Freeh crowd is said to be rich in abusive epithets, the rider, must have been glad when he got back to the jockey's room. Then the stewards took a hand, and in addition to finirig Pratt £20 for careless riding, suspended him indefinitely.

Enoch Wishard, the American, whose caraer as trainer of racehorsos in England is well remembered by sportsmen, tells a story.of an American jockey named Garner which vindicates the claim that the latter is the coolest and most phlegmatic customer riding. This is Wishard's yarn: —Garner fell at Washington some time ago, and his arm was broken. He was sent to a hospital, and while convalescing the nurses would get him to assist, them in unimportant services. One day one of the nurses told Garner to fan a man who was very ill until she returned, as she was going out for half an hour. Garner took his seat by the patient's bedside, and the nurse left him fanning away for dear life, but when she returned she found the jockey sitting by the window intently reading "Deadwood Dick." "Why, 1 thought -I told you to fan Mr. Jones until 1 returned," said the nurse. ""Why aren't you doing it?" "No use to fan him now", answered Garner, looking up from his paper, "he's been dead ten minutes."

Mr. G. D. Greenwood, who is sending a shipment of yearlings from New Zealand to the Argentine for sale, was reluctantly compelled to abandon a much more ambitious scheme-—that of the removal for a season of all his horses in training, together with his private trainer (R. J. Mason), to the country named, where, during the present year, the prize-money will be on a very liberal scale. .Unfortunately for Mr. Greea-. wood's enterprise, the steamer arrangements were unsuitable. The journey from New Zealand was an easy matter to deal with, but the return trip would have proved a laborious affair, as it would have entailed a voyage to England as a preliminary to the passage back to New Zealand.

Bobrikoff, it appears, was erroneously handicapped "for the Sydney Cup, riou having been dominated for that rape, but even with his 9.10 ne is one of the horses already meeting' with support for the, Doneaster, though more in the way of the first leg of a double than straight out. It will be of interest to. those, who fancy him to know that he -is -now stretching out in much better style than shortly after his arrival at Rand- j j wick,. and when he fairly gets oh his 'legs there is no doubt as to his pace. ! That is where the trouble may lie, how- ! ever, as he starts off in a rather scratchy | fashion, and in the last race he won in j New Zealand was whipping in the field after going a furlong or two. The A.uckland scribe. "Spectator," who has seen a good deal of. the black gelding, says ho never seems at all upset by racing, ana then adds; "It is to his disadvantage that he cannot begin faster. In big fields, such as start in the Epsom and Doneaster Handicaps, he would want lots of luck, and still- more over shorter races than a mile for which, however, he may hot be trained. ]. Earnshaw has a big team, but in view of the high class of his new pupil he will find time* to give a thorough study to that gelding's peculiarities, and may solve what has proved a puzzle in the past to his mentor, F. Davis, and so many others. Muscular soreness or stiffness is what I have always put his trouble down to, but one trainer who was recently discussing this undoubtedly great gelding, advanced the opinion thau one of his legs was longer than the others." Bobrikoff's stable companion, Downfall, is moving with great freedom, and the change of scene is evidently agreeing with him. . ~

A Melbourne writer refers to the fact that the riding at the V.R.C. Autumn meeting was not remarkable for its briliancy, but eulogises W. H. Smith to some extent for his vigorous displays of horsemanship on both Wedding Present and Edenholme in their respective races, doubting whether any other jockey would have landed either a winner. His finish on Prince Foote in the Champion Stakes, too, was'a strenuous effort; and, furthermore, the only incident of merit connected with the race. From all accounts to hand it would appear that more than one important event decided at the meeting might have resulted differently had the riders of certain horses not been hampered with instructions and been allowed to handle their 'mounts according to.the dictates of their own judgment,' after having each horse's temperament or supposed advantages or weaknesses explained to them. The alleged race for the Champion Stakes, on Saturday was evidently little or nothing short of a travesty on the greatest of all outdoor sports, but, judging from certain remarks credited to Mr. R. G. j Casey, chairman of the V.R.C. commitr tee, on Monday, means are likely to be devised whereby the repetition of such a farce will in future be avoided at Flemington. To give some idea of what ji muddling contest the Champion Stakes was, it has only to be stated that Prine Footo occupied 3min 7sec longer to get over the journey than it took Eehdil to accomplish the same task last year; while Rippn, with 12.8, got- over the three miles in the Autumn Steeplechase, in which lie had to negotiate,no less than 23 obstacles, in 2miff 12Jsec less than it took Prince Foote in the Champion Stakes. Had Prince Foote been beaten by Pendil in that dash over the last six furlongs, Smith would pro-. , bably have been compelled to face one of the greatest demonstrations ever made against a horseman at Flemington, the incitation of.which, it would be safe to bet, he was not alone responsible for. -' Nobody was, perhaps, more disgusted than the New South' Wales lightweight''with the manner in which the race was run; but all horsemeni experienced or others ise. are, expected to ride Ito orders. There is little 'doubt that in I the hands of any other horseman' the son of Sir,' Foot© would have been beaten as the"'race-was'run^ but Smith is"no- , thing1 if not vigorous, and to this" fact alone might be accredited jbhe aversion of one of the noisest' uproars' yet recorded on an Australian racecourse.

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Bibliographic details

NOTES BY "MULTIFORM.", Wanganui Chronicle, Volume L, Issue 12463, 16 March 1910

Word Count
1,714

NOTES BY "MULTIFORM." Wanganui Chronicle, Volume L, Issue 12463, 16 March 1910

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