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SPORTING.

HOW THE KING'S HORSE WON THE DERBY.

THE RACE DESCRIBED

BY "ROBIN GOODFELLOW."

Fifty yards to go in the Derby and two gal'ant horses expending their last energies' in a Titanic battle to get there first!

One is the King's Minoru, the other his Two Thousand victim Louviers; both are spent, with quivering b-ood-red nostrils, but neither flinches for a moment. Minoru has a slight advantage, and fcncn tension everywhere is frightful as Louviers strives to: wrest it from him. Space wears away; so also, almost imperceptibly, but none the less surely, does Minoru's lead, until the few people who are able to collect their thoughts ask each other whether the shouting is not a little premature. A mighty effort by Louviers in the final Btrides and the King will be beaten. The whip cuts him again and again; groggy with punishment and distress he fights it out with a bull-dog resolution that shames the aspersers of his courage. So they pass the post" locked together, and though^ tho shouting grows into a tumult of joy over a royal victory thousands of eyes are turned anxiously to the board for official endorsement of the impression' that Minoru has got home first. Won by a short head! And a short, short head at that, a nose as they would describe it in Australia, just an inch "or two! What a world _of difference these short heads make in racing! THE KING'S THIRD WIN. Mr. Walter Raphael, if appearance go for anything, has many years of healthy life before him, but he might reach his hundred and not again conic so near to wiuning the Derby. Tho King has now been successful three times. So also has Lord Rosebery. But the late Duke of Devonshire patronised the turf on a lavish scale for half a century and never'approached nearer to a Derby triumph than when Dieudoune ran fourth to his stable companion Jeddah, owned by Mr. Larnach. ■'

Minoru was swallowed .up and kind of lost in the frenzied crowd which inundated the course from "TattersaliV enclosure right away down to the paddeck. A lane is usually kept on the etand sido for horses to return to tho saddling place, and all the Derby runners came back through it, some with difficulty, for not even mounted constables could preserve a clear passage for them But the crowd seemed to take possession of Minoru. He had finished on £he far side of the course, *md when Jones pulled him up he was instantly surrounded. His neck and sides were patted, and in a delirium of enthusiasm people started plucking hairs out of his mane and tail, but ho at .last resented this as a liberty by showing his heels.

''When the tapes went up I got nic&fv off fourth or fifth," said Herbert /ones, the winning jockey.

i(I was in a good position- and the horse, wont co kindly that I had no trouble to place him. I took up the running coming down the hill just T)«?----forc making Tattenham Corner, and Louviers on my right was going strong. I steadied my horse- coming to tho road, and Louviers headed me, with Valens on my left also'going'well. I did not fear Valens—l knew I had him set—but I quickly took it up again from Louviers and then it was a battle. . ' ..-.-.

"Perhaps I headed Louviers just afc the right moment, for he cam© again, And, as you know, the finish was very near. But I thought I'd won, and the ehe'ers soon told me that it was all right.' 3

Herbert Jones succeeded the late John Watts as "King's jockey." He burst into fame early and in a curious n*ay in connection with Diamond Jubilee, the King's second Derby winner. Diamond Jubilee was a horse of peculiar temper, and he took an intense ■ dislike to M. Cannon, who was to have ridden him in his classical engagements. Jones at that time was serving his Apprenticeship at Egbert House, and Diamond Jubilee appeared to find a '•kindred soul" in the boy, who could «3o what he liked with him. This good understanding resulted in Jones being given the mount on him in tlio Two Thousand Guineas, and he won that race as well as the Derby, St. Loger, and the Eclipse Stakes. Jones is one of the most skilful jockeys tiding, and particularly successful with what arc called "funny" horses. '

Richard Marsh, the trainer of Minoru, has long enjoyed the patronage of the King;. Probably he has never done anything better than to get Minorn forward so early in the season and keep him, a perfectly trained horse on the Two Thousand day, at concert pitch until the Derby, some time ago, when the royal fortunes were not in the ascendent on the turf, the King bade Marsh not to be despondent. "It's all my fault," his Majesty remarked, "for having such bad hor.~es." FORMER ROYAL SUCCESSES.

Horf.es carrying the- royal colours iiavo always lent. a supreme interest to the great race, which is now 129 years old. The Prince of Wales, afterwards George IV., won in 1788 with a horso called Sir Thomas. The Duke of York, his brother, won with Prince Leopold in 1816 and Moses in 1882. King Edward, then Prince of "Wales, had his first winner. Persimmon, thirteen years ago. In 1900 he won again with Diamond As King he was represented' in the Derby by Mead in 1903, Nulli Sccundns in 1906, and Penier in 1908.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/WC19090710.2.8

Bibliographic details

SPORTING., Wanganui Chronicle, Volume L, Issue 20263, 10 July 1909

Word Count
917

SPORTING. Wanganui Chronicle, Volume L, Issue 20263, 10 July 1909

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