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NOTES BY "MULTIFORM."

Amongst the dates fixed for the principal events in the colony are:—August 13, G.N. Stesples; 15. G.N. Hurdles; September 26, Wanganui Guineas; November 2, N.Z. Cup. i The dates for Australia include :— "October 5, A.J.C. Derby; 7, Metropolitan Stiakes; 13, Caulfield Guineas ; 19, Caulfielcl Oup; Nov. 3, V.R.C. Derby; 5, Melbourne Cup. The edit Maranui that Mr. D. O'Brian has taken over to Australia was bred in Taranaki, and althoug|h he has no public form to recommend him, lie is accorded by competent critics a first-toLa^s certificate on the score of appearance.

Miaranni was sired by Malafcua, by M.alu.a (son. of St. Albans) from Faithfur, by Darrhvetll (sou of Tim Whiffler), from Emily Faithiful, by Lecturer (son of Colsterdale). The colt will, all. going well, fulfil his engagements at the A.J.C. meeting (Randwick), being engaged in the A.J.C. Derby, and will then be sent across to Victoria as an aspirant for the much coveted Melbourne Cup. The 'chaser Haydn, who has now entered on his 14th year, was-'not raced until five years old. The old follow will probably "be a competitor at Randwick. An early oolt foal, tborn on Ist August, at Glemora Park (Auckland), claims Sou It as his sire iand his dam Lady Musket (by Blairgowne—Muskerraa). Phaetomtis, favourite for the C.J.C. Grand National Steeples, is reported te be in good1 form, and must play an imrortant part in thlat event. The V.R.O. Derby winner, F.J.A., who now l aces under the niame of Soarpia, was solidiy backed for the Visitors'

Handicap at the Roytal Ascot races last month. As Soarpia started second favourite at 4 to 1, and there Avas no doubt about tho money comins- from the rigjit

quarter, he dertainly put up an inglorious performance by running last in a field of ten. For tho four days' meeting at Ascot (Eng.) -the pr'zo money totalled 38,E3fi9 soys. Although they had a rough passage, Realm. Mozart, and Wanda. Avere landed in India in excellent condition. One of the most promising two-year-olds seen out in England this season is Prospector, a son of Pioneer (sire of Polar Star). A well know-n Clarence River sportsman, who is 47 years of age, claims that ho has attended every meeting of the Clarence River Jockey Club for the last 46 years. A rising two-year-old half-brother to Mahivtonga (Quilt —Maude), who is in work at Hawke's Bay, is stated to hs a very handsome youngster. The imported horse Rhubarb is reported to have done well sines being taken in hand by J. Witeon, jun., and ■he should be worth keeping in mind for one of the Cups—the Melbourne Cup for choice; There- is very little dicing in the Sydney betting market, speculation principally being confined to "the little double." One oi: tho light-weights finding favour for the Epsom is the Voyou horse Kiss Me. Orby, suibsequent to winning the Derby at Epsom, accounted for the Irish Derby at the CiuTagh, his starting price being 10 to 1 on. Orby was Aveightad at 9.1 for the Royal Hunt .Cup, 7 furlongs 166 yards, but, as that weight Avas considered prohibitive-, did not run. ! George Walls, who has been suffering for £ora? time past from the injuries receive:!! Avihen St. Amelia fell with him at Otaki in June last, has been compelled to enter the Palmerston Hospital for treatment.. • The death occurred in England last month of the stallion Love Wisely (Wis.dom—Lovelorn), Avho while on the Turf a\iqii the Ascot Gold Cup and Jc'ckey Club Stakes, -and at -fcfee stud sired, among others, that good horse Bridge of Canny. Bushranger, a three-year-old Carbine colt, ran second to Qu' App?lle in the Prince of Wales' Stakes of 2175 soys., 1 mile 5 furlongs, at Ascot last month. Bushranger, who is owned by Mr. G. ,Faber, and was ridden by L. HeAvitt, ,Ava.3 at 100 to 6 in a field of eleven. "Deutscher Sport" refers to the advent in Germany of the Hungarian horse AA'ith the unpronounceable- name." i.e.. Ezerkilenczszazegy. It is certainly a jaw-breaker. Ezarkilenczszazegy, ac^cording to "Vienna Sport," means the 'year 1901, and that paper suggests that he eh.oulcL.runj as "1901" in Germany. The aged Trenton hor.?e Tdrpoint, avlio won two big races in England last month, was sold as a yeanling for 150 guineas. A couple of smart ciolts out of Greek Girl, a daugjhtea- of Trenton, are showing excellent farm in England, and it is a pitiy so much of that sire's fame promises to be of ia posthumous order. The icable announces that Sir Humphrey de Ti-affo.rd has been gazetted a bankrupt in England. It is further stated that during the last eighteen years ho has expended £500,000 in racing and horse breeding. At the same time it is improvable that he lost any■tihing like the amount named through his breeding and racing experiences. T\\io ex-Australians in Mount Dane (Prince Chester—Mount Royal) and Seclusion (Wallace—Monastery) ran a double dead heat at Mysore (India) in the contest for the Maharajah's Cup, of 3030 Rs. and a silver cup value 500 Rs., presented by the Maharajah of Mysore, over a distance of I 4 mite. After the 's.fcrnid tie th'-v -nvners of the horses ;i}viv<.-w] tn divide ue prize. It ia only in hci -^ racing that interferences take- place, out according to an Adelaide exchange a special meeting of the committee of the Mo-Int Gambler Hunt Club was held rocortly to hear complaints from, the mas ur against three of the riders in a him; at. Louden Hill. Tavo Avere reported for over-rid-ing the ipasti-r, and one for impertinence to him. It was decided to adjourn the meeting to allow the riders to be present. Racecourse appointments at most English tracks are a long way behind thos3 prevailing in this colony, and when The White Knight and Elder ran a dead heat for the Ascot Gold Cup the verdict could not be communicated to the public for some minutes, because there is no place on the Ascot number board to exhibit the cypher denoting a dead heat, and the result was known in tho streets of London by means of i£io evening papers before the majority of pople on the course Avere cognisant of the facts. A remarkable mishap befell the two-year-old Darraoq on a recent Saturday. After lie had run at Morphetviile he wias being led into- his box at the Britannia, Hotel stalbles, when the lad who Avas in charge felt a tug and turned round to see tho c-'lt apparently baing swallowed up by the «a'th. Darracq had crashed through the covering of an old Avell, the existence of AA'hicTi had bsen forgotten. Assistance Avas immediately obtained and Arith the aid of lights the colt Avas found at the bottom of a Avell 40 feet de-p. with Irs head and neck only out of the Avater. A stable lad was lowered into the Avell, and after considerable trouble fixed the ropes on the colt's front legs. Haulage tackling Avas also secured, and Darracq was thus raised to the surface. His skin AA'as barked in one or two places, but otherwise lie AA'as none t!:e worss for Jiis strange advent ture

Mr. Buchanan was supposed to have Iliad a slice of bad luck prior to Noctuiform's defeat, ias after his horse Golden Measure* had Avon the Gold Vase the same afternoon, it was given out that the trophy presented by R-ng Edward in connection with that race had disappeared. Luckily for Mr. Buchanan, /tha trophy stolen was the Gold Cup, value:! at £500, attached to tha racs subsequently won by The Whits Knight. It, as well as the other cuips to be competed for at the masting, Avero in charge of a policeman and a representative of tho manufacturers on the lawn at the back of the grandstand, and white lan immaculately-dressed stranger was receiving directions from those two individuals as to the location of the nearest post office, his confederates got away with the trophy with "much less exertion than it took The White Knight to dead heat the French horse Eider. To use an Americanism, R. Wootton made a "killing" when Fabric won the Newcastle iHandioap Plate, I 5 mile, at Newcastle (Eng.) last month. The topweight, a moderate horse named Shilfa had 9.10, so it will be recognked by Australian racing men that Fabric was well treated with 7.4, and"'as he Was (backed from 10 to 1 down to 5 to 4. his owner Ava,s evidently quite prepared for his su'co3ss. Fabric never left the result •in doubt over the last half mile, and though ho only Avon by two lengths, one writer, says lie could have increased it to twenty. Some of the sporting writers were evidently annoyed at boing caught nan-ping in connection Avith Fabric, and. aft»;a* touching on that horse's indifferent form last ssasoi, went for the haradicappers en the lenient manner in whicihi they almost invariably treated comparatively unknown quantities. Wootton is said to have won a fortune, and he would be amused lat the scl'ibee not discovering until after the race that Fabric Avias too well in. When Sans Souei 11. won the Grand Prix die Paris at Loaigchamps last month, the attendance showed what an "interest Parisians take in racing. No less than 96,966 persons paid for admission to that rart of the (course known to us here as "the flat." This was

an increase oi? 20,000 over the previous year, but for some unknown reason there was a falling off of 5000 in the paddock, as compared with when Spearmint won, and consequently the totalisator returns in that reserve suffered. Sans Souci lil. was favourite iat a shade less than 3 to 1, and, inclusive c-f a breeders' premium of £600, Baron Rothschild benefited to "the extent of £10,187 in prize money. The field did not include any Eifglish horses, but -French racing men are hopeful it will bn different next year, when the conditions of the ra-da stipulate that the winner shall receive at/least £12.000. If that sum d:e-3 not pTove attractive t>o the owners of tire b:st Engl'sh three-vear-olds, it will indeed ba surprising. The old style of riding races is even more hopelessly fxtinct in England than flag starting (writes a London, scrilx?). It originated in the style of riding which is more convenient for the ridir, though more tiring for the horse. The humbler yet more quick-witted riders of donkeys discovered ages ago that the back of the animal is not the place on which you mu-t sit if you want to be carried to advantage. A donkey has practically no shoulders, so you must sit on, his croup, if h(j! has to gallop. With horses, however, the forehand "is well developed to b?ar a 'burden, and it can hardly be- dis'putsd that tfie spesd of the animal is enhanced by Ms having perfect freedom all along his back to gather himself for his hind strokes, and to< strike them. This with a jockey sitting on his withers ho can do; with one sitting on his back he cannot Jdo so freely. It is almost abjure! to bring the question forward again, for really its scientific certainty no longcH- admits of argument, but as we nro in a period when apprentices and jockeys with one or two exceptions all have adopted the,same, style, th? natural ci*?nciene:-c« of some as compared with others call for somi> apology, as also for an explanation that this method of jockeyship, though more efficacious than tho old, is infinitely more difficult to grow perfect in.

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Bibliographic details

NOTES BY "MULTIFORM.", Wanganui Chronicle, Volume L, Issue 12135, 12 August 1907, Incorrect date

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NOTES BY "MULTIFORM." Wanganui Chronicle, Volume L, Issue 12135, 12 August 1907, Incorrect date

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