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OUR TURF BUDGET.

SPORTING, ] FIXTURES FOR THE MONTH. 14.—Concluding day Wellington 11.C. "Winter. REMINDERS FOR OWNERS AND TRAINERS. 'NOMINATIONS. 27.—C.J.C. -Grand National Meeting (minor events). ACCEPTANCES. 27.—C.J.C. Grand 'National .Meeting (Grand National Steeplechase, . Grand National Hurdle Race, Winter Cup). NOTES BY MULTIFORM. .Maniapoto is one of the favourites for the Caul field Cup. . Florio will not make the trip to Riccarton. 'He will be 'blistered and spelled. Phaetoiiitis and Ability have- been •resting since their return from the North. Earns and Exmoccr have been extensively backed for the Grand National double. C. Jenkins won two of the four flat events on the first day of the Wellington meeting. Roosevelt is the name selected for the yearling colt by iMenschikoff from Yankee iMary It is said that nest year D. Price will do the .riding for the Hon. J. D. Ormond's stable. Welbeck is reported to be doing excellent work >at {Riceartoh for the Grand National Hurdles. On form Armamento reads particularly well in the Thorn don Hack Handicap" at 'Wellington to-day. H. Carmont's victory on 'Mareotic in the Parliamentary Handicap was his third success in that race. Trent was put up for auction last Saturday at Gisborne.^He failed to change ownership, being passed in at 56 guineas. It is estimated that the crowd which assembled to witness the running of the Derby this year numbered well ' over^alf a million persons. On t'ho advice of experienced soortsmen the steeplechase jumps at Trent'ham were cut down all round prior to opening day of recent meeting. , Solution, the winner of the last Hawko's Bay Cup. looks to be well treated in the lEmpion and .Metropolitan Handicaps at 3-7. 'and .8-2 respectively. ■y-<llx, refer.rir.g .to the CauLfield Cup ■ of <%hs. t&ustrala- * sian, says he would have •dhahced Menschikoff'with a good deal less than 9-7. .... At me time or liis.. mishap nothing v.ms going better tMii Slow Tom, in the Wellington Steeplechase. His rider (J. Stewart) had a collar-bone fractured. At .last advices Lord Ullfn's Daughter was the ruling favourite for the Melbourne Cup, 100 to 7 being the price quoted about the daughter of Lr.chiel. It is reported that Captain Campbell's team, consisting of Playfair, Sabraon, iin-d Elmwocd, are to be sent to England alter the Grand National Meeting in August. ■Bonn ell c (Con qu er or —St eph an otis) hiv< t!;c reputation of being veiy fast in i'.cr track work, and is expected to run well in the Trial Plate at Trenthain to-day. In (Melbourne during the last five yo.rs 460 ))roseutionH against gambling iiitvo been institiited by the police, and 'fillers and costs amounting to nearly £-5000 have resulted. Coursa (by iMedallion —Iris) and La rijontorio (by .Mahaki—Bijou), ,»-ihavegone to Auckland from Palmerston' fsr the purpose of being mated with Soult tin ring the coming .season. Heracles, a 'half-brother by Simmer to the New Zealand owned Handel, proved victorious in the Stewarts' Mile at t'ho Canterbury Park (N.S.W.) fixture on the 23rd of last month.

Liberator hag been purchased by Mr. W. Smart, a patron of F. Hig^ottV stable and owner cf Shrapnel Shell, at Wellington, and he was .shipped to his new home yesterday by the iMokou.

Last iMonday week a deputation of the unemployed in Melbourne waited on (Mr. John Wren (of "tote*' fame). He gave them a, cheque for £100, and undertook to employ 30 of them at the standard rate cf wages. Realm, winner of the Y.R.C. Grand (Xation'al Hurdle Rrce last Saturday at Flemington, is a five-year-old gelding by iMajestie out of Lynette. Majestic is one of Trenton's, and so- far -lias sired quite a number of -useful jumpers. "Windy, who scored in the Digley Handicap of 5 furlongs at the Melbourne Hunt Club meeting last week, is :a three-year-old filly by Cuncotton —Brown Spec. In 'New Zealand she used to race in the nomination of Mrs. McConkev.

'Montijo, who won a double at Gisborne last week, is a particularly well bred gelding, foeing by Strowan-lmmen-sikoff 'his sire being a son of Lochicl. and his dam, was got by Monaco (son of St. Leger and the imported English brccxl mare. Lady Ravenworth) out of Luna, by Hecukmeum — May Moon. Should Mr. F. 'Martin not be able to dispose of .Reoha-bite prior to his departure for the Old Country, for winch place 'lie leaves 'by the Athenic next Thursday, 18th inst., 'he intends to ease Jacobite's son off and treat him to a spell. until he (Mr. Martin) returns to tho colony, which he anticipates doing by the eiici of the present year. Another of Carbine's three-year-old descendants has achieved distinction. This was the appropriately named Foresight, 'who carried t!he colours of Lord Fitzwilliam to victory in the Fortyfourth New Biennial Stakes at Ascot. As tlie vjilue of the .race would be- in tho vicinity of lOOOsovs., Carbine's winning total receives another good lift. Wirral, who has been taken to Trentham in company with Lyrist and Medallist, is a coming three-year-old son of .Birken'head and Nixie. He is engaged in the Trial Plate at Trent'ham to-day. (Last year the -Hon. J. D. Ormond supplied the winner of the Trail Plate in Mobility, and in 1904 The Stake, ran second to Mouro in the same event.

Hineora, who won the Hack Flat Handicap at the Gisborne meeting, and showed promise, is by Daunt out of Hinepare, the latter _mare having first seen the light on Porangaliau station. She is. a full sister to Freeland, Mystic, iMyfitfcai, (Magic and Co., and ccmequently is a .relative of Mystification, as his dam and 'Hinepare used to carry the colours of a local native sport, Mr. Mali a nga Kaiwhata. Martinique (Wonderland —Vesper), w'ho was bred by Mr. G. Hunter at Porangahau, and <who, like his relatives Evening Wonder and Evening, is an (adept in the "lepping" portion of the industry, was recently purchased in Melbourne ;by the Victorian bookmaker, •Mr. E. Kelly. Martinique is engaged

By

SiTt&tPifhr'm

in the V.R.C. Grand National Steeplechase at 9-0, the event coming up for decision next Saturday.

I had a ilcok at Halberdier on the roads on Thursday afternoon. The old fellow is doing plenty of hill work and is beginning to recover that sharp perky look so characteristic of him when in 'form. His owner had applied a mild ■blister to his off foreleg the same morning, and he will get a few days spell. Ohlsen has now got him to a stage when a few weeks' sharp gallops would bring him back to racing trim. He certainlooks and moves as if he would stand facing. Mr. G. Thursby, the well-known and popular English amateur rider rode Picton into second place in the (English tDeriby. iMr. Thursby's luck in connection with the Derby, however, is not very good, and, after steering John O'Gaunt into second place two years ago, it must have been very galling to the well-known iamateur to again just fail to realise what to every real sportsman, is a life's ambition. The sooner •Ribbon.wood's 2m. 9s. record is beaten the better (remarks a •Sydney writer), as then the great hoi'3e would probably make an attempt to regain, his lost laurels. D. J. Price, who trained and drove Ribbon wood in the great 'match when he made his record, says he won with commate ease, and 'had he ibeen pushed could have knockoff a much faster mile. He also reckons Ribhonwood's' 2m. 9.3. fully equal to 2m. 4s. in America.

A (New York exchange, in mentioning that the American Jockey Club voted £10,000 towards the relief of San Francisco sufferers, says : —"Now let us hear from the reformers, the gentlemen from Spokane, Comstock, De Lacy, and all the pool rooai fraternity. Possibly they are siding with the Christian Science party at West Ninety-six-th Street. City, who on Sunday declined pivblicly from the lectern, to gather a fund for the sufferers, believing it a visitation on the wickedness of that city." ■Major Loder, the owner of Spearmint, has received a large share of fortune's favours during his association with the Turf, and it is not often that ia Derby winner in embryo is picked up for the small sum of 300 guineas, which was the price paid for as a yearling. That Major Loder could have won the Derby two yearn ago with Pretty Polly had she ibeen entered 'for that race is pretty certain, ibut the icrcwning pleasure has not been long deferred, and this excellent sportsman received many congratulations <on his Derby victory. Spearmint is a bay colt by Carbine— ai*ad7-.tfP-t»e-"Mint, bred by SirjTatton Sykes, was purchased by Major Loder as a yearling for 300gs. First time out as a two-year-old he won the Great Foal Plate of 835 soys, Lingficld Park Summer, ibeating Succory by a head. At Derby September the colt finished second to Black Arrow in the Champion Breeder's Foal Stakes, but at the■Houghton Meeting at ■headquivrters he was unplaced to Farasi in ihe Richmond Nursery Handicap. On M-ay 30 he ■won the "Epsom 'Derby and on June 12, the Prix de Paris. Rongoa, the winner of the Wellington Steeplechase, was bred in the Auckland district, by iMr. Donald McKinnon, and was sired by the Ingomar—Albatross horse !Loch Ness, who was a good stake-earner in the Waikato sportsman's colours. Magnesia, dam o-f Ron- ! goa, was successfully over big fences in the colours of IMr. John iMarshail, u'ho was present at yesterday's meeting to see Pearl Necklet carry the " all bbick" jacket. Itongca competed in the last Wellington Steeplechase at the old course. He came to grief, and suffered injuries which put him on the retired list for some time. At the iDuned.'n Cup meeting in February last he won i three hurdle races.

A writer in the Melbourne "Sporting Judge" says that from what he has heard of late the- time seems to bo approaching when it will be necessary for the V.X.C. to take in hand the question of country handicapping. Aracoig sumo of the weight adjusters alluded to, at least one is said to "lean"' considerably towards certain folk, and .another bets largely when certain "friends" 'have goad 'things. The cutting up cf Victoria 'into (sections .and the appointing of .a handicapper for each section 'appears to bo a good way out of the difficulty. The several haudicupper>3--say about'ionr—-could then confer occasionally. ■■ What its commonly known as vice ■in l'l-cehorses is frequently brought about by injudicious methods of tr.iining, a, fact new generally admitted. Tlie' lat3 Thomas Dawson once had under his charge a horse named Mentor, with whom he had been severe that the hcr.se conceived a violent hatred to him, and, as a consequence, he could do nothing with him. So unmanageable did Mentor become indeed, that he was transferred by Thomas -Dawson to his brother 'Matlncw's place. There, being allowed to take his ease and kindly treated, the horse quickly became quite tractable. "When. Matthew reported the result of his treatment to his •brother, the latter offered to bet him a new !hat that he would not dare -approach the 'horse if !he -should hear h;s (Thomas's) voice. The wager was made, and the pair moved in the direction of the Stables. .Mentor received his trainer in his usual friendly manner,' until 'he heard m voice whisper, "Poor old •Mentor !" That was enough ; out went t'hc animal's leg, and _m an instant the docile creature was transformed into a furious wild bea.st. The principals to the wager, and the friends who accompanied them, were not long in nuaking tracks after that.

There is every indication that New Zealand will again be strongly represented at the .Australian Jockey Club's spring meeting. D. Price is already at Randwiek with Melodeon, Savoury, and Starshoot; J. Lowe will make a start towards New South Wales with Solution before the present month ends, while next month will probably .see Malm tonga, Swimmer, land Cavalry sent across the Tasman Sea. .Mr. J. Monk, is. stated to be much 'in doubt as to making an assault on [Randwick with Aehilletj for the Epsom Handicap. The Spring Stakes and the Craven Plate (both of which 'races are run at weight-for-age) may, however, prove ■a sufficient -draw to the Wellington sportsman for him to send the son of Medallion across the rica to endeavour to win racing honours in the land of his "birth. >Mr. Stead will, it is expected, send a team ■acroivs the water, which will include some of t;he youngsters eligible for the Breeder's Plato and Gim■crack Stakes. The Ellerslie trainer J. E. Thonpe is credited with_ also having ambitions to win honours in Australia, and according to present appearances the full brother (Marshal Soult and the half-brother to Cambrian, -undergoing their preparation (at his (hands,, will make their debnt in Australia. Altogether, ia survey 'of the situation leads one strongly to embrace the view that the forthcoming rap-ring meeting to bo

held at II and wick will be brimful of interest to New Zealanders. SPEARMINT'S DERBY. L\TERI£STING~£E7AILS BY THE ■MAIL. The last English iMail brings details ■of the victory of Carbine's son, Spearmint, in the Epsom Derby. The London .Daily Telegraph's Commissioner writes :— Eleventh-hour- developments on the Derby were principally noticeable for t'ho steady support forthcoming for Lally, who, adverse report's notwatliGtanding, Was considered by his 'connections to be fit and as well as he could be possibly made. Spearmint •weakened slightly, though no liberties were taken with him, and from what could be gathered ia:l'l connected with him were sanguino of success. That their optimism was not misplaced was shown by the result, and the fact that ho won easily proves very clearly that there could have been nothing wrong 'with his trial ■with Pretty Polly, a gallop which many Shrewd judges declared to be too good to be true. The volume of wagering was on a by no means a big scale, and beyond the two favourites there was only ia moderate amount of support for such >as Malua. Sancy, and Gorgos, though Black Arrow, in spite of his well-known vagaries, enlisted plenty of public followers. It was rightly thought that if he was on his best behaviour he ■migjht effectually confute his detractors, :and in a year like this enrol himself amongst the band of Derby victors. Vast as is the paddock, it was well filled in the interval, most people ■being naturally anxious to see the cracks.

The Egerton House pair, Nulli Secundus and Gcrgos, were walking' about by themselves, and the former, who is a fine colt, found many admirers. His ignominious failure in the race created intense disappointment; in fact, it was .somewhat disheartening to see the Royal candidate trotting in with the crowd. He seemed' absolutely unable to gallop, and in view of the hopes which were cherished of him some ■weeks ago, it would seem as if the colt was eithering suffering from some serious complaint or is hopelessly moderate, after all. Gcrgos was immensely liked, as he appeared to have done remarkably well ijiiice the Newmarket Stakes. He was full of muscle, and looked infinitely more forward in condition than he did ■w-hen he won the Two Thousand Guineas. Though some people voted Lally rather light, I t'liought he looked better than he did at Newmarket, and the only question in his case was whether he would actually get the course or not. His stable companion, Sarcelle, was clean and 'hard, and is a nice horse, though he hardly filled the eye as a potential Derby winner. His Eminence wr,^ nearly, if not quite, the handsomest horse in the paddock, though perhaps Black Arrow might have strongly dTsputed the point with him. Colonel liall Walker's colt was as quiet as an old sheep, and if he has not become altogether amenable to reason, he has at least improved in his manners. Spearmint was sweating considerably under his middle, but otherwise he appeared to he yteryvwellj, havjng s a.-lot. t of muscle*on his* quarters.' He''W'a:'Strdng v ' well-balanced colt, a little bit lacking in quality, perhaps, but one 'who should train en, and if he cannot be numbered 'amongst the best-class Derby ■wiriner.s, he will certainly bear comparison with a few who h.-avt; gained Blue lliband honours in the past. All the same, it cannot bo said that fhe paddoct inspection increased tne number of his adherents, and nearly every other person one met declared emphatically fw Gorgc-s. Picton, however, is an exceedingly good-looking colt.

in the c.intor to flic post nothing moved 'better than Spearmint, Picton, and Sancy, Lally, as ■:<> his wont, going with a high action, which, as a rule, delineates the sprinter rather than the orthodox stayer. He was also unruly Avhen the lot assembled behind the barrier. At first it was feared that Black Arrow was going to give trouble, but Lynhani handled 'him very judiciously, and after the colt had backed away to the edge of the crowd he walked up again just as the starter had got them nicely in line, and. except that PrinceWilliam ■"■vv-as left, the field jumped away upon fairly equitable terms. TVoutbeck was tlie quickest off, and set a nm> xpaee, being closely followed by Picton, SI ipa way colt, and Sancy, with Black Arrow next- in front of LUalun, Lally, and Spearmint. The favourite began slowly, and was never on fighting terms with the leaders; but down the hill Picton and Trout-beck were racing together,whilst Nulli -Sccundus wn=» thus early tailed off. As they rounded Tattenhain Corner, -where there wrs hardly any ::.?mmmagjng to speak of, Spearmint improved hi-s position at a great p.ice. and though Picton and Trout-beck were closely followed into the straight by His (Eminence and Radium. Spearmint, on the outside, quickly closed up the gap, and, heading Picton bekr.v the distance won very comfortably by a length and a half, with 'Mr. -Dugdale's colt well clear of Troutbeck, who .ran surprisingly well. Whether Picton would have won had Mr. Thur-sby not made quite so much us? of him is questionable, as on the whole the amateur rode a determined race, iMaher, who steered his third Derby winner within ;a few years, displayed admirable- judgement, and the mount w&s a fortunate one for him, as a. few days ago it was expected he would have to ride one of -Lord Derby'is, but the wit'hdrawl of Victorious set him free. If Maher's luck 'was dend in, the r-ema.rk applies with equal force to ■Mr. Gilpin, whoso experience in having in his stable two animals capable of .winning the Derby is probably unique. It is an open secret that he fully expected to secure the race with Flair, and. when Sir Daniel Cooper's beautiful filly went amiss, this gentleman naturally received, many condonenoes. Then Spearmint was suddenly protruded as a colt likely to secure the spoils for the Clarehaven 'Lodge establishment, but people were naturally incredulous. It is said that money tells the most significiant tale, and it wp/s so in the case of Spcarimint, who on the strength of having acquitted himself so well with Pretty Polly in the home trail, 'was backed to win ia large stake. The 'report was that the colt war? being reserved for tho Grand Prix do Paris, and it was an unmitigated triumph to get him fit enough to secure the Derby after all. THE WELLINGTON MEETING. This meeting will -be concluded at Trcntham to-day, and a> the acceptances are good the programme shoukl attract a large gathering to the Trentham course. Tho programme .commences with the Onslow Handicap, in which tho bottom division appear to »:o!d tho strongest hands, and I like the •chance of Aboriginal, White Star, and Sir Percivale. The 'best of these may be ABORIGINAL. In tho Final Hurdles, Exmoor, with 11.11, appears to bs left with a chance, and after him I like nothing but Monarque 10.4, Cuiragno 10.1, and Sardonyx 9.12. The winner may turn up in CUIRAGNO. In tho July Steeplechase I like best the chanced of IRISH. There is a fine field engaged in the Winter Oats, wliich should be. pmduci tivo of a good race. Hatley, Maui, ( Whito Star, and Sir Pca-civale strike

BHEUMATISM CURED. From Mr. Wm. Milnes, Pallet-street, New Chum, Bendigo, Victoria. | "About eight years ago I was, for a j considerable.time, a great sufferer from | rheumatisn^./Acting on the advice given j me by several people, I took Warner's i Safe Cure. I am pleased to say that. j when I had taken the contents of two bot- j ties, I was cured." J From Mrs. Nellie Davidson, 32 Keig- j street, Newtown, N.S.W. "When living in Boggabri, about 18 months ago, I was laid up for nearly the whole winter with Rheumatism, and could not obtain any relief from any of the ■ several medicines I took. One day I saw a pamphlet issued by you in which was described a case similar to my own, and I decided to try whether Warner's Safe Cure would also benefit me. I took three bottles of the medicine, and am very glad to say that I was completely cured and Mould go about my work cheerfully. I have not felt the slightest symptom of the return of any rheumatic pain since that time." From Mrs. Elizabeth Bosher, 77 Hen-derson-road, Alexandria, N.S.W. '•Previous to leaving England, about 40 years ago, I was a great sufferer from Eheumatisrrt, -whichl continued to trouble me for about 24 years after my arrival.in Australia^ ** I consulted several doctors, but they failed to do me any good. I also tried various advertised remedies ■with the same unsatisfactory result, and despaired of ever getting relief from the pain. At length. I tried Warner's Safe Cure—for what reason I cannot tell you, because I did not expect to get any more benefit from it than from the many other medicines I had taken. I was, however, pleased to notice a decided change for the better after a short course of Warners Safe Cme. The pains slowly but surely left me, and at last I became quite free from them. This happened 16 years ago, and I can honestly say that I have not suffered in the slightest degree from Rheumatism since that time, so that I have to thank Warner's Safe Cure for perfectly and permanently curing me. .1 may say that my case is very well known in Alexandria, as I have for 40 years resided within half-a-mile of my present address." From Mr. Albert E. Lond, Port Pirie, S.A. "I am pleased to report that I have taken five bottles of Warner's Safe Cure for Rheumatism, and that the result was marvellous. The pain has all left me, I Jiave gained a stone in weight, and am now in good health." From Mr. William Pollock M'Auslan, 10 Russell-place, North Williamstown, Vie. "Some eight years ago I was laid up with a very persistent attack of Rheumatism, and although I was under the ■care of a leading medical man, at the end of four or five months, instead of getting ibetter, I was growing gradually worse, iird in the doctor's own words 'would nsver make any permanent improvement.' Rearing that his words might come true, t refused to take his medicine any longer, iind, as a last hope, gave Warner's Safe Cure and Warner's Safe Rheumatic Cure a trial. From the taking of the first dose I could see nope ahead, and in a very .little while all pain had left me, and I •never had the slightest sign of any relapse antil my complete recovery some seven ■weeks later. The doctor's words, thanks 'to Warner's medicines, have not been verified, as from that day, eight years ago, to thil, I have not had the slightest symptoms of that dreadful complaint." GOUT CURED. >-From Mr. R. A. Thompson, Mining CEnHneer, 148 Adelaide-terrace, Perth, :w.a. "When writing you some time back as .to the eificacy of Warner's Safe Pills in fcilioueness, I mentioned being about to try a course of Warner's Safe Cure for Gout. The result of taking the niedicine was simply wonderful, as many people £n Perth can testify, and I speak gratefully of the benefit I received. The action of the medicine was this : First, a gradual toning up of the stomach* then better appetite, purer blood-making, and.j : slow (at fit**) but^fiure,disappearance of; -.-'the Gout. '3 The food taken during,the course was plain but wholesome. I am glad also to tell;you that many of my ac- , ■ quaintances have derived gueat benefit from both the Safe Pills and the Safe Cure." • ff Lumbago cueed.° From Mr. F, L. Seager, Waratahstreet, Darlinghurst, N.S.W. "About six years ago I had an attack of lumbago, so severe that I could not walk for nine weeks. I tried many medicines, porous plasters, and electric batteries, without material relief. My doctor could do nothing for me. Hearing so much about Warner's Safe Cure I decided to try it. After taking the first bottle I felt greatly relieved, and started to walk again, and after taking eight bottles I was completely cured. I have not suffered in any way since, and strongly recommend Warner's Safe Cure to anyone afflicted with a similar complaint. I consider the medicine invaluable." SCIATICA CURED. From Mr. James Spencer, 62 Queenstreet, Fremantle, W.A. "Some years ago I was a fearful sufferer from sciatica. Most excruciating pain seized me, extending from the hip right down to the ankle. None but those similarly afflicted can imagine the agony I endured. The pain deprived me of all sleep. I could barely move about. I had medical aid, but it did not relieve me. My attention was called to Warner's Safe Cure, and I commenced to take it, deriving benefit after the first few doses. By the time I had finished four bottles the pain had all vanished, and I could again get refreshing sleep. I have every reason to believe that Warner's Safe Cure lias eradicated all rheumatic poisons from my system, as I have had no return of the pain since that time."

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OUR TURF BUDGET., Wanganui Chronicle, Volume L, Issue 12936, 14 July 1906

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OUR TURF BUDGET. Wanganui Chronicle, Volume L, Issue 12936, 14 July 1906

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