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At the Opera House to-night Mi- Harry Rickards' Mo. 1 Company of vaudeville stars, .will make their first appearance in Wanganui. Cinquevalli, the world-famous juggler, is the chief attraction, but Mr Kickards, with his usual managerial enterprise, has surrounded the star with a formidable company of artists rarely seen in the same programme. Each individual artist or artiste is in the foremost rank of the profession, having gained a great English, American, and Continental reputation. Oinquevalli, we are informed, will submit a great number of his most famous feats, in which he combines the art of juggling with an exhibition of strength rarely witnessed in any person. His famous billiard ball trick will be given, also the great and sensational cannon ball feat, in which he juggles a 481b. cannon ball, an empty bottle, and a small ball of paper, finally throwing the canon ball high up in the air and catching it again at the nape of his neck. It is a most astounding exhibition, and invariably rouses the audience to the highest pitch of excitement. He will also give his umbrella, belltopper, and cigar trick. Cinquevalli is assisted by an assistant, whose by-play is said to be excrutiatingly funny; in fact, both Cinquevalli and hia assistant are comedians of no mean order, thereby making his act not only an entertaining, but alsoi a humorous one. He will, of course, give numerous other tricks, his turn occupying altogether about 30 minutes. Madame Lydia Yeamans-Titus comes to us also with a great reputation. It is said, this artiste is unique in her entertainment, which is pronounced the most, refined, artistic, and humorous turn on the vaudeville stage. Her imitation of the late Sims Reeves' singing of "Sally in Our Ally" has made her renowned throughout England. She has a beautifully mellow voice, splendidly trained, and in her act has the assistance of Mr Frederick J. Titus, an accomplished solo pianist and accompanist. Another novel item will be the ventriloquial act of Mr Charles' Cobly and Miss Alice Way, in which they introduce their own creation, entitled "The Dancing Doll." This performance is said to be a scream of laughter from start to finish. Professor Chas. Wrigley, an eminent saxophone and clarionet soloist," will appear, and Miss Nita Leete and Mr James Opie will sing several well-known, ballads. The terpsichorean art is represented by the diamond duo, and Mr Charles Walker and Miss Ida May will supply the comic element. Early doors will be opened at 7, ordinary doors at 7.30, and the performance commences at 8 o'clock sharp.

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OPERA HOUSE. Wanganui Chronicle, Volume XXXXVII, Issue 11658, 28 May 1902

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