Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
This article displays in one automatically-generated column. View the full page to see article in its original form.

LOCAL AND GENERAL.

The Christ Church Sunday School entertainment will, according to pretont arrangementß, take place about the 12th of April in the Oddfellows' Hall. The Wanganui Rifles fire their eleventh competition for Messrs Hallenstein i3ros'. Cup on Monday, the 2nd proximo, and the final on the following Monday. The handicap for the former is the same as the last two competitions. We are requested to state that, at the Baptist Church to-morrow evening, tho Rev. H. Peters will address himself specially to young wen, taking for his subject "A_ Worthy Aim." All young men are invited to attend. We are asked to state that a purse containing money was found on Messrs H I. Jones and Son's counter yesterday afternoon. The owner can recover same by applying at Messrs Jones and Son's shop ] and describing the purse and its contents. ' Captain Irvine, the Harbourmaster, reports that there was a very fine waterspout observable from the Heads yesterday afternoon. It was about four miles off the shore, and in a W.S.W. direction. It was observable for nearly half an hour. The Wanganui Amateur Athletic Association holds its Autumn Meeting this afternoon. The entries are much better than last year, and if the weather holds fine there should be some good sport. The meeting takes place on the Collegiate ground, which has been lent by Mr Empson. During the afternoon Mr Kraus will provide refreshments in a tent. The first event takes place at 2 p.«n« 4.8 indicative of what can be done in the way of loading the direct boats lying in the roadstead, we may mention that the Wanganui Freezing Works put on board the 8.8. Hawkes Bay no less than 14,683 carcases of sheep and lambs between Saturday night and Wednesday morning last. There were also shipped 200 casks of Mow nad 140 bales of wool. This is not a bad record when it is remembered that our tenders have to work by tides. The quarterly meeting of the FoxtonNew Plymouth Railway Employes' Sick Benefit Society was held at the Masonic Hall on March 29th, Mr R. Ewmg (Vicepresident) in the chair, 48 members being present. The Secretary's quarterly report was read, showing the income to be .£lO9 10s Bd, and the expenditure .£IOO 18a 3d. After dealing with the correspondence and other society business, 13 new members were proposed and accepted. A vote of thanks to the chair terminated the meeting. The Borough Council have received 24 applications for dairy certificates and licenses to sell milk, which were considered yesterday afternoon by the special Committee appointed by the Borough Council— the Mayor and Councillor G. Carson. The Sanitary Inspector and Assistant Sanitary Inspector were present, and reported on a number of the dairies. Several applications were dealt with, and the remainder held over until Mr Copeland has had time to inspoct tho remaining dairies. The memlecs of the Police Force of the Wanganui sub-district are presenting Sergeant-major Anderson with an address on his resignation as officer in chaige here. The address, which is very neatly and appropriately wcrded, has been illuminated by Mr Clark, of Mr A. D. Willis's establishment. It is signed by all the members of the Force serving under the Sergeant-major, and reads as follows ■.—" Dear Sir,— We, the undersigned, members of the Police Forte stationed at Wanganui sub-district, desire fco express to you our sincere regret at your having been compelled to rotire from the service through failure of health. We trast that ere long you will be restored to a perfect state of convalescence, and may you onjoy many years of peace and happiness. During the time you have presided. over us we have at all trfmes found you kind, considerate, and impartial, and ready to instruct, which your unquestionable ability qualified you to do. We now ask you to accept this as a slight token of our esteem for you," [Here follow the signatures.! The funeral of the late Mrs T. "Walker took place yesterday, and was attended by a large number of symputhisin (? friends. The body was taken to Christ Church where the funeral service was conducted by the Key. T. B, Maclean (fncumbont) assisted by the Rev. Mr Hermon. The choir took part and aang the lovely hymn " When our heacls are bowed \yith woe." As tho colfin was borno out of the church tho organiat (Mr Purcoll Wo 1 b) played tho " Dead March in Saul." Tim burial service at tho grave was performed by the Rev. Mr Hermon, Mrs Walker's death was vory sudden, she having only lately beon on a visit to Auckland whence she returned apparently in her usual health. Two days before her death Mrs Walker fell ill and was visited by a doctor, who, howevor, thought it_ was only a passing indisposition, aud caid hs was of opinion she would soon got over it. About midnight, whilst her husband was watching her, she appeared to fall into an ordinary sleep, but Mr Walker.noticing a sudden change, called for assistance, and it was then discovered that death had claimed another victim. We tender Mr Walker our sincere sympathy in his los3— a los 9 made tho heavier by it 3 dcoadful suddenness.

A special meeting of the Harbour Board is to be held this afternoon at 2.30 o'clock. Messrs H. I. Jones and Son notify tha* owing to stock-taking, they will not be open on Monday next, the 2nd April. There is no supplement issued with tho Chronicle to-day owinc to the holidays having interfered with the wesk's arrangements. Entries for all events at lhe winter meeting of the Egmont Racing Club clos e with the Secretary, Mr A. Brett, Hawera , this evening. We have been asked to intimate to the residents at Westmere that Divine ser- \ ice will be conducted in the Presbyterian Church there to-morrow at 2.30 p.m. Rothly Temple, in Leicestershire, the birthplace of Lord Macaulay, has been sold by private contract, for over .£40,000 t.y Messrs Hampton and Sons, Cockspur Street. • The property includes the historical mansion, Knight Templaro' chapel and crypt, and memorial rights, with about 900 acres of land. Rothley lies in tho centre of the Quorn district, and near the celebrated Forest of Ctmrnwood. Henry VIII. seized Rothley at the dissolution of the monasteries, and granted the lands to Edward Ca7twri(»ht, who sold the manor to Humphrey Bacington, an ancestor of |Lord Macaulay's uncle. Kothloy was the soene of many a stirring event, especially at the time of the conflict between the houses of York and Lancaster, and it was to Kofchley Temple that King Richard was carried after the battle of Bos worth. A slight printer's mistake in the Paris " Bottin," or Directory, has led an unfortunate man to commit suicide. He carried on business in the Rue dv Faubourg St. Martin. As he was looking through the book, he thought ho would ccc if his own name and address were given. To his surprise he found he was described ss "Madame" and a widow. Without losing any time, he rushed round to the place where the Directory is printed to give instructions for an altera tion to be made in the new edition, but, arriving there, he was told he had come too late, as the work had gone to press. Returning home, he locked himself in his bedroom, and blew bis brains out with a revolvar. It appears that htj had been suffering from the hallucination that be was being persecuted by everybody. Mr Albert Bayly, of Omata, was married on Wednesday to Miss Blackey, who for some time was matron to the New Plymouth Hospital. The Taranaki News mentions that a novel depai.ture was made on the occasion in the dress of the bride. Instead of the usual eleborate toilette, Miss Blackey wore the hospital unifoim, and the bridesmaids were also dressed in a similar manner— and very pleasing and neat they looked. The bridesmaids wero the nurses. The newly married couple were driven to the hos. pital, where a most sumptuous breakfastwas awaiting them. The institution bad been very prettily decorated for the occasion with evergreens and flowers, and the presents, which were numerous and costly, were en view. About 80 guests sat down to breakfast, aud the usual felicitous spee3b.es were made. A short time ago a well-known inhabitant of Wildervank, in Holland, locally reputed to be tolerably well off, died, leaving a letter in which he solemnly adjured his relatives to have him buried just as he was, clothes and all. Hi 3 wishes were duly carried out. When the affaire of the deceased came to be inquired into, it was found impossible to say what bad become of his fortune. It was known, for instunce, that he was possessed of 10,000 florinß in bonds to bearer, but his heir searched high and low .vithout being able to find the slightest trace of them. It then occurred to someone that perhaps the old man, who was not precisely on good terms with his relatives, might, by his singular request, have caused his securities to be buried with him. An application has been made to the authorities for permission to. exhume the remains, and there, for the present, the matter rests. The annual report or encyclical of the Holy Sjnod of Russia this year e^patiatos upon the steadily-growing subineness of the mass of the Russian people in matters of religion, and their ever-iucreas-ing disregard for the most sacred rites and ceremonies and sacremental observances of the Orthodox Church. The Synodical encyclical advances the proposition that all such civilisation and culture as the Russian people possess they owe to the church. This statem nt an Odessa correspondent meets by saying that the Russian Church neither teaches nor leads the people in manners nor moials. Not more than 4 per cent of the people receive anything beyoni a mere elementary education, and more than 80 per cent are totally illiterate Whilst at school tlw Russian youth receives a kind of superficial religious instruction once a week, from priests or seminarists, but once the educational course is finished the seeds of religion thus carelessly sown are left to propagate or wither ; there is no subsequent religious guidance or instruction from pulpit or rostrum. A meeting of the Museum Trustees wa3 held in the new building yesterday afternoon to consider especially the date of the formal opening of the institution and the proceedings to be adopted thereat, There were present — Messrs Carson (Chairman), Freeman R. Jackson, Nixon, Turner, Atkins, Drew, Marshall, and Dr Tripe, It was decided to ask the Domain Board to improve the roadway from the Ridgway-street entrance, in accordance with a design suggested to the Mayor. For the formal ceremonies on the opening day, it was agreed that the Museum building was not large enough, now that the exhibits are in place, and that a large marquee would have to 1)9 crested on the ground to hold a portion of the people expected. It was decided to ask His Worship tho Mayor to open the Museum, and to write to Sir James Hector and Sir Robert Stout, asking them if they can make it convenient to assist in the opening ceremonies. The opening day has been fixed for some time in May, and, as Sir Robert Stout is expected to be in Wanganui about that time, it is hoped to secure his presence on the occasion. The member for the district and several other local gentlemen will also be asked to assist, A committee of ladies, consisting of thb wives of the trustees, with power to invoke the assistance of their friends, was appointed, to be requested to undertake the arrangements for providing afternoon tea for the visitors on the opening day. The charge for admission on the afternoon was fixed at 2s Gd. The annual general meebiug of tho Bras» Bands Association was held in St. Paul's School, Dunedin, when the following bands wore represented by delegates: — Garrisons of Timaru, Christchurch, Invercargill, Quoenstown, Lyttelton, Wellington, Port Chalmers; Guards (Invercargill), sydenham, Staninore and Engineers (Canterbury), Waimate, Brunnerton, Reofton, Naval Brigade, Engineers, imd Kaikorai (Dunedin). Mr E. Stratton (Kaikorai), the local VicePresident, was voted to the chair A motion from the Dunedin Bands to rescind a motion passed at the Oamaru Encampment in 1891—" That the head-qnarters of the Association be fixed in Christchurh," was, after a long debate, lost by large majority. The end of the financial year was altered, the words, "September 30bh " being deleted and the words " last , Saturday in February" inserted. The motion "That valve trombones be . debarred in future contests " was carried, but tho rule net to be enforced till after , tho contest fixed at Invercargill in Octobor next The election of oflicers , for tho year resulted as follows ; — Uis Excelloncy Lord Glasgow, ■ patron; Mr W. H. Wynn-Wil- j Hams, president. The vice-presidents ; and ,th 9 Executive Committee of last year , were ro-oleetpd, whilst Messrs J. Painter, , sonr., and W. Mansell wpro re-elected ] lion, treasurer and hoa. secretary, and , Mossrs T. S. Morllock and W. J. Lar- . combe, auditors. Each band was allowed two votes. Each soloist will play a test ] solo at the next contest. Invercargill's ] suggestion to invite Australian bands to t compote was carried. After tho discus- ( tion of matters connected with the ( Christchuruh contest and explanations , being given thereou, tho meeting clospd j with various voUs of thanks, and a.d- , journod until lister next, j \

Two young ladies of Dundee loft England in the second weak of February on a journey round the world. They are sent by the proprietors of the Dundee Courier and Dundee Weekly News for the purpose of gleaning information as to the conditions of female labour in the various countries, The advance of surgery (says a con" temporary) can furnish few more singula* illustrations than is supplied by an opera" tion in one of the London hospitals, whereby the breast of a blackbird was fastened to a woman's face as a substitute for her nose, which had been so damaged that it bad to be removed. The operation waß proved perfectly successful, with every appearance of a woman boing provided with a useful naasal appendage, though how it will perform its functions when the cure ib complete remains to be seen. A case was being heard in a Berlin law court the other day, and the evidence of a lady was being taken, when suddenly, d projios of nothing in particular, the Judge eaid sternly, '■ Do you like potatoes, madam ? " Naturally the people in court were mnch surprised, and their surprise was intensified when the Judge proceeded to make grimaces at the witness and to talk at random on incongruous subjects. The unfortunate gentleman had to be led from the bench, and placed under the care of a keeper. The incident made a very painful impression on those who witnessed it. It is now probable that the German national monument to Bismarck, for which about £60,000 has already been collected, will be erected somewhere near the new Imperial House of Parliament on the Konigsplatz, whore also stands the Victory Column commemorating the three campaigns which made Germany one. But, much to the regret of the commiteee the statue will not be allowed to take an equestrian shape, such a form of monumental honour in Berlin being only granted to Royalty. A Berlin wit once remarked that the Prussian idea of Heaven was for a man to be on horeoback ordering about a less fortunate fellow creature ou foot. Sir Herbert Maxwell, in his life of the late Mr W. H. Smith, quotes a letter written by Disraeli, scolding Mr Smith for boing absent from a snap division taken by one of the Irish members, Mr Synan, on which occasion the Government were put in a minority, Mr Justin McCarthy now explains how the division was won. The St. Stephen's Club, just across the road, was connected with the House by telegraphic wires, so that the Conservative members lounging there could be warned in time of a division. An Irish member (now dead), who was at once a practical joker and a skilled engineer, contrived to cut the wire, and then urged Mr Synan to rush a division. Hence the unexpected defeat. Napoleon relics are going off so well in the salerooms in Paris just now that the demand seems to be creating a supply. At the sale at the Hotel Drouot, the Paris Mart, of the collection of the late Dr Molloy.there was one item thus described : — ''63. Ornamented china cup out of which Napolean I. drank hi? last drink at St. Helena." Accompanying the treasure were papers vouching for ifcs authenticity. Just as he was about to put it up for sale.however. the auctioneer, At. Ducret, carefully examined the cup. To his surprise he found upon it a mark which, clearly proved that it bad baen manufactured in 1810 or thereabouts, during the reign of Louis Phillipe, The discovery caused quite a sensation. Of course the cup was not sold. The latest novelty in inoculations is inoculation for the bite of vipers. Two French physicians, of the Paris Museum of Comparative Pathology, Messrs Phisalix and Bertrand, have been experimenting-, with the result that they have suecaeded in communicating a slight attack of snake poisoning to aome guinoa-pigs. By heating seine viper virus at a temperature of 85deg Centigrade, they have succeeded in weakening it to such an extenc that the guinea-pigs were none the worse for tho operation. Mejsrs Fhisalix and Bertrand claim that animals so treated are " protected from the effect of future snake bites" They hope to Bee their plan adopted in India and elsewhere where venomous snakes abound. - • An old Wesleyan Maori Church, which was burnt down on March 25th, at the top of Constitution Hill, Auckland, had a history. The building was one of the oldest in Auckland, and with its destruction has dieappeared another link in tho history of old Auckland. It was built half a century ago, and has had a checkered career. The Maoris gave it a stated land endowment, the Church to be used for Maori services for their countrymen visiting Auckland, and especially for those putting up at the hostelry at Paipapa (Mechanics' Bay). When the Taranaki and VVaikato campaign took place the Natives abandoned coming to town, and the religious services ceased. For over a quarter of a century the building has been cobwebbed and dilapidated, with smashed windows (the result of the visits ef larrikins), and it has beea the picture of desolation, occasionally giving shelter to the vagrant, Of latter date it must have baen re-furnished, for its last Btand apparently was its conversion into a dancing school, whera young pupils) learnt the art of dancing. The new international copyright law, sa ys an English paper, has been in °peration over two years, and in some r especfcs it is possible to judge of its operation within that time. Mr Q-. Haven Putrran, who is well informed on this Bubiect, treats it briefly in the January number of the New York Forum, as it affects Am9ncan and foreign authors, American readers and American publishers. American authors have been disappointed in its results, They have not obtained the English returns which they expected from the protection of their works by an English copyright, and though the sales of their books in foreign countries are on the increase, they are hardly yet what might be expected. On tho other hand. English authors have been also disappointed in the sale of their books in America. The demand for English fiction has greatly fallen off, and' the result is that the English have not gained at all what they expected when they could control their own books. In neither case has the international copyright law done for authors what it was hoped that it might do. They are not much better off than they were before. But there bin been eliminated from the hook publishing trade a groat deal of fiction which was worthless in ltuelf, and for which there was no legitimate domand. Amencau readers hayo not been deluged with cheap fiction. The London correspondent of the Christchurnh Press writes :— " Several Now Zealand ladios now resident in London have been enlisted by Mrs Fawcett (widow of Professor Eawcett) in tho crusade which she is assiduously preaching on behalf of Women's Franchise in England, This is felt to be peculiarly appropriate after the action of New Zealand in initiating this great reform, and I hear that tho Now Zealand ladies in question, who do not wish thoir names publicly mentioned, are meeting with much success in their canvass for signatures to the petition which is to be presented to Parliament. Now Zealand visitors always have a most cordial reception at the various ladies' clubs — literary, aitlstic, and social — which now abound in the metropolis. They are greeted as representatives of the first country which has fully and without restriction or qualification recognised the claims of women to equal votiug rights with men. And this is a very popular position just now. Roally, [am inclined to think that apart from whatever benefit New Zealand may derive politically or personally from the feminine vote, the adoption of tho feminine franchise will be beneficial in another way, as it is an advertiseinont of tho colony's courage and go-aheadness. It is assuredly taken in this light by numbers of people, and it has drawn public attention to New Zealand and New Zealand's distinctness from Australia , that is decidedly advantageous. One meets with New Zealand everywhere in the public prints. It is no longer a questipn of hunting for references to the colony. They are so abundant and mostly so interesting that the Jificulty is t j ' cull ' them and quote only the best. Oertainly, New Zealand is in high favour at Home just now, and this fact should be utilised so far as may bo practicable and desirable." Cease's DandemonCofiee is the surest cure for indigestion, Sold by all grocers. — Advt.

This article text was automatically generated and may include errors. View the full page to see article in its original form.
Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/WC18940331.2.6

Bibliographic details

LOCAL AND GENERAL., Wanganui Chronicle, Volume XXXVIII, Issue 11952, 31 March 1894

Word Count
3,677

LOCAL AND GENERAL. Wanganui Chronicle, Volume XXXVIII, Issue 11952, 31 March 1894

Working