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LOCAL AND GENERAL.

♦ Kakaramea Stock Sale.— Mr Freeman R. Jackson will offer for sale, at his yards, Kakaramea, on Saturday next, over 400 head of cattle. Pi.M. Court. — A native named Paewi was fined 5s at this court yesterday morning for drunkenness, and Is, cost of conveying him to the lock-up. Colonel McDonnell, J.P., was on the bench. New Zealand Ferns.— Mr H. C. Field, who has just returned from the Murimotu country, has succeeded in procuring specimens of some very rare ferns which only grow in the vicinity of Ruapehu. He intends sending them Home to the Kew Gardens. Aramoi-io School.— Mr A. D. Willis has, with his customary generosity towards deserving objects, consented to show his oxy-hydrogen lime light exhibition in aid o f the prize fund of the Aramoho School. The entertainment will take place at Aramoho on Monday evening. Fire at Palmerston. — A fire, by which the residence of Mr Ellis James was totally destroyed, occurred at Palmerston on Monday afternoon. It was first observed by a workman in an adjoining field, and the flames were then breaking through the roof near the chimney. The family were inside at the time, and were unaware of the danger. The house was insured for £100, and the furniture for £50. Death of a well-known Colonist. —We (Ashburton Guardian, December 10) regrat to learn, from a private telegram placed in our hands to-day, of the dsath of Mr R. Reid, the senior partner in the well-known firm of Reid and Grey, the famous agricultural implement makers. Mr Reid was on his way out to the colony in the Lady Jocelyn, and died at sea on the 15th of October. No further particulars are yet to hand. Banquet to the Hon John Bryce. — Preparations for the banquet to be given to the Hon Mr Bryce were being vigorously pushed forward at the Princess Theatre yesterday. Mr D. Ross had a number of men engaged fixing tables and getting everything in order. The committee to whom the decorations have been entrusted will be able to commence operationsjthis morning, and before evening will probably have completed their, work.

Alteration. — Attention is directed to an alteration in Messrs Druinmond and Alexander's advertisement, which appears in another column. Bank Holidays.— Saturday , Monday, and Tuesday, the 24th, 26th, and 27th instant, are proclaimed bank holidays throughout the whole of the colony. Service of Song. — We learn that it is contemplated to give a Service of Song in connection with the Christ Church Sunday School in a short time. The programme is already in active preparation. Return.— The Rev. Mr Bavin arrived in Wanganui yesterday on a visit, having come overland from Wellington. His many friends will be glad to learn that the reverend gentleman is looking quite himself again. Harrison Place. — We would direct the attention of the Corporation to the present condition of Harrison. Place. From the Institute to the Police Station nearly half the roadway is overgrown with docks and weeds, which, a few hours labour would remove. The Murimotu Track.— The settlers on the Murimotu Plain are now very anxious that Field's track should be opened sufficiently for pack-horse traffic without delay. Topia, the native chief, has laid an embargo on their wool, and will not permit them to pack it down to Napier, and their only hope of egress for their produce is by the track to Wanganui. We are informed that there are 3200 bales of wool lying waiting to be brought to a market. The track discovered by Mr Field is said by everyone who has passed over it to be thoroughly practicable. It is as nearly in a direct line to the centre of the Plains as possible, and is some thirty miles shorter than any other route' The cost of forming a sufficiently good road for pack-horses is not likely to be large. j The Ballot.— An amusing little incident occurred in connection with the recent elections in this city. A man went into one of the polling booths and asked for a paper. The Eeturning Ofiicer asked his name, in order, of course, to see if he was on the roll, but the would be voter told the officer to mind his own buisness. " I must know your name," said the E. 0., " before you can vote." " What business is it of yours to ask niy name ?" angrily retorted the other. " That's what you call the secrecy of the ballot, I suppose ?_" The Returning Officer explained that it was necessary to know the name of each voter to see if his name was on the roll, but again the irate gentleman told him it was like his impertinence to ask such a question, and he bounced out of the booth, saying he'd be hanged if he would vote at all. And he didn't. — N.Z. Times. Larrikinism. — A piece of larrikinisni which is deserving of severe punishment if the perpetrator can be discovered has been committed within the last day or two. One of the plane trees recently planted by the Corporation on Taupo Quay has been ringed in the most deliberate manner with a pocket-knife. The endeavours of ouv "Civic fathers" to beautify the town, by planting trees along the streets, are most laudable, and if their efforts are to be in this way thwarted by mischief-loving scoundrels the pity will be great indeed. The tree in question, which was in a most thriving condition, has been cut almost through a couple of feet from the ground, and if it is not altogether destroyed, its appearance will be much impaired for years to come. All of the trees arc flowering and growing rapidly, and if left alone will enhance the appearance of the town in a year or two. All a Blank.—" What Sir George Grey, X.C.8., as Governor, Seperintendent, M.H..R., Premier, Gentleman of fortune, and landed proprietor, has done for widows, orphans, poor people, and particularly for the working man." Seeing the announcements round the town and in the Press that we were to learn all these things by pamphlet, we (Auckland Free Lance) looked with much interest for the gratifying information, and were therefore sold in our tenderest feelings, when a beautiful little pink-covered book, with the title elaborately printed, was put into our hands and we discovered that beyond the clap- trap title, decorated we noticed with spider's webs, and the note on the back "Vox et prseterea nihil," "Talk and nothing more," it was a blank from beginning to end. The cruellest part of it is its truth, and that the good St. George has really done nothing. Like its subject the book is a blank fraud. It is a clever skit and caused considerable amusement. The late Member for Rangitikei. The N.Z. Times has the following: — " The somewhat unexpected result of the Rangitikei election has raised a surmise relative to the elevation of Sir W. Fox to the Upper House. Than Sir William no man'rn the colony has a greater claim to the honour ; bis long, very long, course of public services most faithfully rendered stamp him pre-eminently as one whom the colony should honour. There is, however, a little difficulty in the way so far as a seat in the Legislative Council is concerned, and that is Sir William's objection to it. He emphatically declined the elevation when it was offered him on a former occasion. But it is possible that Sir William may be inclined to reconsider the decision he then came to. We sincerely hope so, for his services can be ill spared, and we are confident the Government would be only too glad to add such an Honorable to the list of Legislative' Councillors. At any rate, no possible harm could result from giving him the option of refusing a second time." We should be glad if we could believe that Sir William Fox would see his way to accept the honour, when proposal made ; but we question whether he would consider it in the light of an honour to be elevated to a seat'in a Chamber the very constitution of which, it would appear, has yet to be determined. New Faces in Parliament. — Under the above heading the Evening Post makes the following complimentary remarks respecting the new member for Hokitika. It will be somewhat of a surprise to Mr FitzGerald and his numerous friends, however, to learn that he some time since relinquished his conection with this journal to take charge of the Ashburton Mail :— " Mr G. G. FitzGerald, who defeated Mr R C. Reid for Hokitika by a considerable majority, is a journalist of considerable ability, and many years ago owned and edited the Southland Times at the time when Invercargill was in its full flush of prosperity. Subsequently he was appointed Resident Magistrate at Hokitika, at the same time fulfilling the duties of Gold-fields Warden for that district, which included Ross and Eumara within its limits. This position he resigned after holding it about twelve years, and returned to his old vocation. He was a leading contributor to the New Zealand Times for some nionths, after which he accepted the editorship of the Wanganui Chronicle, which he gave up to take charge of the Ashburton Mail, a position, we believe, he occupies at the present. His Press experience must render him au fait in all the political questions of the day, while his legal information, necessarily acquired by having been so long on the magisterial bench, and his knowledge of goldfields, their management and thennecessities, should be of material value * in the House.

The Postmaster - General. — The Hon. W. Johnston, Postmaster-General, arrived by train from Wellington last evening. He will be present at the banquet to the. Hon. Mr Bryce tonight. School Prize Distribution. — The distribution of prizes at the public schools will take place to-day — at the Girls' High School at 10 a.m., Boys' High School at 11 a.m., and Drill Hall (for the Infant School) at 2.30 p.m. The parents and friends of the children are invited to be present. Wangantji Volunteers.— The whole of the Wanganui Volunteers are under orders to parade at the Drill Hall at 7 o'clock this evening, for the purpose of forming a guard of honour for the Hon. Mr Bryce, Defence Minister, on his arrival at the Wanganui Station. A large muster is expected. The Licensing Law. — Very general interest is felt in the question as to when the Licensing Courts under the new Act will come iuto operation. Until the districts are defined the " local option " clauses cannot be brought intojoperation. Mr Omioncl telegraphed to the Acting Minister of Justice asking when the districts will be denned, and he yesterday received a reply stating that "boundaries of the new licensing districts are being prepared by the Surveyor-General with all possible speed, and will be proclaimed before the March quarterly licensing clay." — Hawke's Bay Herald. Free Trade and Protection. — In an article on this subject the Ashburton Guardian says : — The boast of those who are advocates of what is called " Protection to native industry," that they have made and are making numerous converts to their views in the Australasian colonies is a well-grounded one. The alteration may be for the worse, but there it is. The latest illustration of this change of sentiment is that of Mr Ballance, who has lately publicly avowed himself a Protectionist, though until recently a Free Trader. Now Mr Ballance is not an eminent statesman, but even a straw will indicate in which way the wind is blowing. And it is a phenomenon which is well worthy of attention that in any British community there should be, at least within the lifetime of a generation which has known the discussions on the repeal of the Corn Laws in England, a change of opinion in that, direction. It seems very much like a change of sentiment with regard to the applicability of the law of gravitation to a newly-peopled colony. Accident. — A very painful accident happened on Wednesday to Miss O'Connor, sister-in-law of Mr D. Sinnott, of Taieri, near Milton, which would, without doubt, have resulted fatally had it not been for the courage and presence of mind of one of the employes on the farm, Mr Hugh Sweeney. An infuriated cow broke from the mob and rushed at the young lady, who, seeing her danger, and being unable to Jescape, threw herself upon the ground, in the hope that the animal would run over her, and that she might be able to reach a place of safety before it could revew the attack. Unfortunately no such opportunity was given, and she was tossed about the field in a fearfully dangerous manner. Mr Sweeney, who was on horseback, saw from a distance the critical situation of the lady and rendered speedy assistance. He arrived none too soon, however, tor the cow had gone down on its knees, as if determined to finish the deadly work. Hastily dismounting, he threw himself upon the young lady, and shielded her with his body. His action fortunately startled the cow, and caused it to spring back. In doing so it caught sight of Mr and Mrs Sinnot, a little way off, and charged in their direction, but all were enabled to escape. Miss O'Connor's right leg was fearfully torn from the ankle to the knee, the muscles in places being co mpletely severed from th eir attachments. Mr Sweeney sustained a few cuts about the head, but they were not of much consequence. Dr Reid (says a Southern contemporary) gives a bad account of Miss O'Connor's condition, but is in hopes that he will be able to effect a cure of the wound, and that it will not be necessary to resort to amputation. _____^____

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Bibliographic details

LOCAL AND GENERAL., Wanganui Chronicle, Volume XXIII, Issue 9573, 16 December 1881

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2,299

LOCAL AND GENERAL. Wanganui Chronicle, Volume XXIII, Issue 9573, 16 December 1881

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