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Wanganui Chronicle. AND PATEA-RANGITIKEI ADVERTISER. "NULLA DIES SINE LINEA." MONDAY, 17th AUGUST, 1874.

Volunteers. — The usual monthly inspection parade of the Wanganui Eifles will take place at 4 o'clock this afternoon. R..M. Court. — One solitary drunkard necessitated the attendance of the E.M. at this Court on Saturday last, and was dealt with in the customary manner. Dramatic. — A complimentary benefit to La Petite Amy will be given in the Odd PolloW Hall this evening under distinguished patronage. The programme which appeals in another column should alone attract a bumper house. Miss Amy will take the leading character, Portia, in the Shake'sperian tragedy .," The Merchant of Venice." Building Improvements. — If one thing more than another marks the prosperity of our town and district it is the number of new buildings that are being erected in every direction. We notice that the Bank of Ausiralasia is' now being shut in with new erections on either side, instead of standing in solitary loneliness. Mr Arthur is building extensive show rooms and premises in Victoria Avenue, and a large building is now being erected in Hidgway Street to the order of three well known business gentlemen, who intend it as a suite of offices, to be called the " Tichl»orne Chambers." The size is considerable, there being six rooms on the lower floor. The dimensions of the building are — length 58 feet : breadth, 32 feet. It is the intention of the proprietors, we believe, eventually to add another storey, which the present high price of timber prevents thorn . from rdoing in tko meanwhile. MV Jas. J. AnHe"'or. is ai»o making a considerable addition •iv A'kinson's Hotel, on the Campbell Place front-

Maori Newspapeb. — A Maorr newspaper, called "Te Wananga," has just been started at Napier by Henare Tomoana. It is printed on a short letter paper size, occupying three pages. The object of "Te Wananga" is explained in the introducduetory article. It will agitate for reform iii the iavvs affecting natives, additional native representation, &c. Memorial to the Late Rev E.. Tatlob M. A. — Circulars addressed to each of the seatholders were distributed in Christ Church yesterday, soliciting subscriptions to defray the cost of ajmemorial window to be placed in the Church. We have little doubt that the appeal will be largely and liberaily responded to. Subscription lists have been left at the Banks and at Mr H. I Jones's, Victoria Avenue. Tahanaki. — A Co-operative Baking Company is about to be started, with a capital of £1000, in five hundred shares of £2 each', with power to increase. — The Dunedin Acclimatisation Society have forwarded by the * Phoebe ' a quantity of trout ova, as a present to this Province. — Mr Holloway arrived in New Plymouth on the 13th. — The Hon. Samuel D. Hastings, one of: the highest dignitaries in the Order of Good Templars, is about to visit New Zealand. Mr Hastings is a member of the American Legislature, and has, from his youth upward, been, a strong advocate of the temperance reform. The Pco vincial Question. — The Napier ' Daily Telegraph,' referring to Mr Vogel's -resolutions about the North Island Provifcees, says — " We are aware that the evils of Provincialism are great, but nevertheless, we prefer to govern ourselves after our own fashion, than to be governed by the circumlocution offices at the Seat of Government, whether the head of that Government be a Yogel or a Stafford. The people of this province have once been under Wellington misrule, and we much mistake their opinions, if they would again submit to have all power in their local matters centred in any five or six gentlemen who might happen to be members of the Cabinet residtng in that City. Abolishing the North Island Provinces, until the iron horse runs from Wellington to Auckland, would be the the greatest blow to free institutions that we could receive. It would tend to place even more than at present all legislation in the hands of those who could afford the time and the money to attend to Legislative duties : and these gentlemen would be the representatives of only one great interest. The Provincial Eesoltjtions. — A correspondent of the ' Tarauaki Herald ' gives some further points of Mr _ Vogel' s speech in moving the resolutions in favor of the abolition of Provinces in the North Island, than have been published here. In sketching the proposals of the Government with regard to future administration, Mr Yogel said the charges for the main tfuuk line of railway would be borne by the cousolidated revenue ; but for the future the consolid- \ ated revenue would not be charged with ] what was properly a charge on land revenue. Hoads, bridges, and branch lines of railway would be charged on land revenue, also interest 'on provincial loans. Gaols, police, hospitals, lunatic asylums, and education would be provided for by the consolidated revenue, and in time by a local contribution for education and police ; the present capitation allowance is quite ample to provide for these. Partly local revenue such as license fees, tolls, &c, should be locally distributed. Gold revenue would be expended on gold fields ; the land revenue to go first to pay interest of debt, and a contribution to small local works, and then to maintain arterial works, such as harbors, which he recognised should be undertaken at New Plymouth and Hawke's Bay. No part of the land revenue to go as payment for works already undertaken by the Colony. He proposed to pay Superintendents to the end of their terms of office, and to pension the Superintendent of Auckland on account of his long service in the public affairs of the Colony. He did not think it necessary to make any compensation to Provincial Executive officers ; but the permanent officers of the Provinces to be taken over by the Colony. A minister would reside in Auckland, and a Government agent in Taranaki and Napier. In Wellington no agent would be necessary. The fullest local control would be given over local funds by means of Road Boards and Central Boards, but the Government considered the manage- ! mentjj of gaols, police, hospitals, lunatic asylums, harbours, and education was so bad as to necessitate the immediate interference of the General Government. Wellington Races. — The programme of the Wellington Jockey Club races, to be held on the Butt Park course on Thursday and Friday, 3rd and 4th December has been issued. The events of the first day will be a Maiden Plate of 100 soys ; the Wellington Cup, a handicap of 200 s^vs, with sweepstake of 10 B<>vs added ; Selling Race, of 50 soys ; Hack llace, of 10 soys ; and Provincial Plate of 100 soys. On the second day there will be a Handicap Hurdla Race, cf 75 soys ; Hack Hurdle Race, tf 10 soys ; Wellington Derby of 100 soys, addod to a sweepstake of 5 soys ; Consolation Handicap, of 50 soys ; and Hack Race of 10 soys. Colonial Clergymen. — There is a bill of definite colonial interest now before the Imperial Parliament. This bill was read a second time in the House of Lords on the 7th of May, on the motion of Lord Blachforil, and it proposes to give the clergymen of- the Established Church ordained in the colonies the same status as though ordained in England. The Earl of Carnarvon, Secretary for the Colonies, congratulated Lord Blachford on having confined himself to this one object in the bill, instead of mixing up with it, as had beeu dons on a former oc--casion, the distribution of church property, which should be left to the different colonial Legislatures ; and he had great pleasure in supporting the bill in its present form. Th« Bishop of London defied anyone to say what the position of any clergyman ordained in the colonies or abroad now was, and he hoped the session would not be allowed to ttu-tninate without the passing of a bill whereby, with proper checks, that difficulty would by swept away. The Jfiarl of Kiniberley joined with the right rev. prelate in the expression of that hope, and quite agreed wi;h his noble friend the Secretary for the Colonies in thinking that the distribution of church property should be left ta the different Colonial Legislatures. The bill will, consequently, in all probability be passed by both Houses this suasion, and it cannot be otherwise than satisfactory to the colonial clergy. A.t the same time, it will impose upon colonial bishops the duty of seeing that they do not ordain any persona i cxit'pt such as are worthy of the status to I Wi.xoh they are to be raised.

Coal Discovery. The 'Hawkt-'s Bay Herald 'says — " What may turn out tube a very valuable discovery of a saam of lignite coal, has been made by Mi- Malcolm Carmicliael, who is one of a General Government survey party, now employed in the Forty- Mile Bush. The spot is about two miles from rhts Piri Piri clearing, and three raili'R from Mr Allardice's store. The seam which i*> some ten feet thiclc, rnus in the direction of from east to west, towards the main road from the Rauhiue Ranges, and appears to be of large extent. The coal is stated to be of good quality, and the seam is exposed and cati be easily worked, it is believed that no Europeans have been previously on the spot, otherwise this coal, exposed as it is could have hardly escaped observation. The Winner of the Derby. —Mr William Sherard Oartwright, the owner of the horso George Frederick, the winner of the Derby, was formerly a solicitor. He was articled in Hereford about the year 1829. and was submitted in 1834. From that date until 1866 he took out his annual ceriiHoate, bat. for many years before his retirement he practised very little. During his residence at Newport, in Monmouthshire, where he exercised his profession for more Chan thirty years, he became a coalowner, and this, together with his racing establishment, occupied much of his attention. It is now more than twenty year 4 since Mr Oartwright took to keeping racer horses, and has ! been particularly fortunate ; with many of them, especially, for instance^ with Eiy and Fairwater. Albert Victor, the brother of the Derby winner of this year, was also bred by Mr (Jartwright. In the year when Baron Rothschild won the Derby with Favonius, Albert Viator ran a dead heat for second place with King of the Forest. The Fatal Accident to Captain Hart. I — The circumstances under which Captain Hart, of the sieamer Beautiful Star, met with the accident which resulted in his death, are thus described by the ' Lyttelton Times '- -" The ship jßallochmyle, having received her stiffening ballast and crew was waiting to be towed out into the fairway : the agent of the ship therefore, made arrangements with ;he steamer to tow her out. Shortly after 1 X a. m. the hawser was passed on board the ship. At the time there was a heavy easterly sea tumbling into the harbor. However the steamer took the vessel in tow, and after soon time, hauled her clear of the Gladstone pier. ... .The steamer's hawser then broke, and' the -'ship dropped her anchor. The Ballochmyle's own hawser , (9 inch) was then sent on board the steamer this was passed through the port hawse pipes fastened by lashings round the bits', and } made fast to the mainmast of the steamer. Orders were thon giveu to go-ahead. After a short, time, Oapt Hart went aft to see how the work was going on ; wheu he had descended from the poop, the lashings of the hawser gave way, and, owing to the .heavy sea, and the vessel surging the" hawser ciught the captain on the legs throwing him heavily on the deck. On being picked up, it was found that the injuries he had received were very serious. Dr Smyth, of the Ballochmyle, was quickly in attendance as was aho Dr Rouse, who was summoned. A consultation was held and the decision was, that the right leg below the knee must be amputated and that the compound fracture in the left leg could be reduced. The operation took place yesterday, Dr Rouse, Smyth, and Macdoiiald assisting." It is stated in another paragraph that Captain Hart bore up bravely until, as already reported, death put an end to hia Bufferings when two miles off Otago Heads.

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Bibliographic details

Wanganui Chronicle. AND PATEA-RANGITIKEI ADVERTISER. "NULLA DIES SINE LINEA." MONDAY, 17th AUGUST, 1874., Wanganui Chronicle, Volume XVII, Issue 2513, 17 August 1874

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Wanganui Chronicle. AND PATEA-RANGITIKEI ADVERTISER. "NULLA DIES SINE LINEA." MONDAY, 17th AUGUST, 1874. Wanganui Chronicle, Volume XVII, Issue 2513, 17 August 1874

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