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Wanganui Chronicle, AND PATEA - RANGITIKEI ADVERTISER. "NULLA DIES SINE LINEA." TUESDAY, 16th JUNE, 1874.

E. M. Coukt.— A druakard was sentbacod to 24 hours imprisonment at this O'»urt yesterday. L J A?i;R Making. — A joint stock company for paper making purposes, with a capital uf £15.00.0 is projected in Dunedin. Waitoiara.. Bhidge/ — A sentence was '•nutted from the paragraph about this budge in yesterday's isauej explaining that Vi-b bridge is designed ou Howe's trtibb • principle. j Lal'b AociDßiS'T. — Mr Birchall haa partly i-coovt-red Jfroai ihe ufi'eois of the fall he rea ived on Suuday last. Mr Pearce we are j sorry to say has had two fits and ia afcill ' lying iv a tiangorous state i a iSiiw Use fob Pumicestone. — Xiast. ! *-. veiling a gentleman wliw had only lately vuit«d Taupc^ in givinji adesuriptiou of the billiard tahlt& thtve, stated that there wub (ma with pnnoice&toue slates (1) We presume the gentleman meant pumice bed*. Kakthqdakes. - -Karthquake movements iyavti been pretty irt-quuiit iv .New Zeaiaiid lately. A severe one was felt at Tauranga between haif-paat 1 and 2 o'clock on the yiorning of the 27th ult. , and another shock ajjout 1 p.m. the same day Maori Coach. — Considerable amusement saa created in town yesterday afternoon by the appearance of a four horse coach driven ny a ziativo and ioaded with Maori passen|j.>is. The horßes seemed to be well seleoted felur-i being a pair of cuebalds and a • pair oi baye and a nuinbur i>£ natives ivere^ridiug buiiind the vehicle on horseback. We have iiot heard what is the intention of our dusky fpiends probably they are poing to start in cptpusttiou to Cobb and Co, "V.DLUKXEBa Land Grants. — The volunteers in diti'urent parts of the Colony are uui ating for the land grants which under tile Act of 1865 it is contemplated should be given them a£iof tive years service. The J.»uti din voluiiteerii reueutly held a meeting «.iu '.Uu bu^jeot, and the Wairoa B.itte V'oiuiitceis hay*.' [jutitioned the Ua«kc"ij''Bity ii- -vincial Council, praying that body to take into consideration the advisability of "lauf-iny lcinti (or certilicates for thy pur- j chasu vi land), to efficient moiubenj of five | y j -'.r{i* ijervjceu and up wards. !

Tjik Lauouk.' Market. — The carpenters at GisiTornc, Poverty Bay, 6eia^ dissatisfied with their present waives, lately. held, t. meeting to consider what steps should be. taken with regard to demanding an increase of 2s per. day on tlip present rate. After con- r siderabie discussion, a written " undertaking* not to. 1 work for les« than 12s per. die in was drawn up, and siytitsd by thirteen or foiirteeu of Lhose.- present. 'The question ot-hi--am*u rating, a protection society was also mooted , but considerable difference of opinion prevailed in this matter. . j LmuiAiiy Classes. — Wauganui seems j now i.ii be alive jt > the importance of foster- ' ingj'a spirit of research and enquiry among ; its -young nioir. The literary olasses already in «xia?ence beat 1 - testimony, not only by r.heir numerical strength, but by a ■growing desire to gain useful knowledge, that we are as a community gradually improving in these respects. Mr Eiinslie'a cla*a is going steadily onward. Mr Berry holds a similar bible and mutual improvement clas-j weekly, takiing every alternate Tuesday for literary pursuits, when papers on biography, history, etc., are read by members of the class. The literary class meets this evening (Tuesday,) at a quarter past seven, when any who are inclined to attend will receive a welcome.

The Bohough Enxhneek. — So dissatisfied are the Councillors with Mr Millar's management of the public worka entrusted to his care that we believe it is intended to make entirely new arrangements with respect to the Borough works. The matter will probably be discussed in the Council t'lis evening, when the particulars of tho proposed arrangement will be disclosed. There can be no doubt that, a radical chatige is needed' Whether ihe blame be partly or wholly attributable;, to Mr Millar, it is unfortunately the fact that the first portion of the drainage works are being constructed in so expensive a manner and at a price so far bej'ond the estimated cost, that, if the remainder of the woi ks be constructed on the same scale, so much of the £30,000 l<>au will be spent that it will bee ane necessary to raise a further loan in order to supply the town with water, to say nothing <:f gas — whereas the loan of £30j000 it was supposed would be sufficient to cover the whole cost of water, j>as, an(^ drainage works. v The monthly expenditure of the Borough is>now about £500, and how little there 13 to show for it residents in the, town can see for themseive3. Moreover the utter want of subordination of the Engiueer to the Borough authorities is acting very prejudically to the interests of the town in the ordinary worka which fall- to the lot of the Engineer to execute, and it 13 high time that matters were put on a proper footing The Council must treat its Engiueer with all oourtesy, but at the same time insist upon its right of control. If it allows the public funds to be wasted for want of supervibion, upon its head will lie the blame.

Thjb Dumping of Wool — Complaints have recently been received from England as to the injury dune to New Zealand wool by tlie process vi (lumping. The following letter ou the subject from Messrs Kinross and Co, appears iv the ' Hawke's Bay Herald' — " Our attontion has been directed to a letter in your paper of Tuesday last, from Mr Arthur E. Russell on the subject ol dumping wool, There is no doubt many of our New Zealand .vools especially those bei ug in grease, materially suffer from excessive dumping. Were 'he wool growers generally to take the matter up the -remedy would lie in thei-r^wir haiids. by the pressure they would bring to bear on the shipping companies. The New Zealand Shipping Company, for instance, is largely composed o£ runholdore, and by combining, • t.hey mi^ht secure the discontinuance of undue dumping in their large flVet ships,. As far as regards this Province we are happy to assure our wool friends that the wool is more lightly dumped at this port than any other port in the colonies. Iv Wellington the bales are subjected to a much greater pressure and captains of sliips there will not aocept our dump. They cut the hoops and redutnp the wool into much, less compass. Our correspondent writes us that they thus gain on an average 10 inches in height ou each aide of our double dumps. We have repeatedly shipped homy part of the. same clip, dumped and undnmped with the view of ascertaining if it is worth paying an extra freight for undumped bales. We have not found that the undumped wool brings any higher pric; in the London market. Were captaina of ships bo allow their wool to be ato.ved without the use or screws no doubt shipper's might wir-u advantage pay a much highur freight. So long however as tfie pre sent system of stowing obtains we should prefer sending home our wool moderately dumped. The bales are kept intact and iharu 13 no loss of wool in the hold of the ship."

Ex rRAORDINAKY TkLBGRaPHIC FEATS. — At the telegraphic office, VVashington, on the lUh December, 1873, (says an American j >urnal) an experiment was carried, out in the presence of iVLr Cresswell, the Post-master-General of the United S.tate3,. the practical results of which will be of Inxineiise importance as reyards. the future of telegraphy throughout. tlie~ world. On thnt occasion the President's laGt annual message of 11,500 .vords, was transmitted from Washington to New York, a distance of 290. mil us, over a singly wire in 22^. minutes, the speed being over $$,500 letters per minuru. At Now York the message was delivered from the automatic instrument, printed iv U«»ld type, in presence of the Postmaster of JSbW York. This achievement in telegraphy is the more remarkable na thw principle involved is not new, b:it was well ku.twu iv 1848. The experiment made at that date was practically without reßiilt. By the new American combination ot chemistry and mechanism, the speed is apparently almost unlimited, messages at the rate of 1,200 words or 6,00u letters a minute being afterwards transmitted with < qually satisfactory results. Hitherto the apted attainable over circuits of similar length iv this country, by the Wheatstoue auioinatic BVB r ern at present in use for the " high speed ' service of the Postal Telegraph Department, does not exceed 200 letters a minute. The now American instrument has a great advantage in the extreme simplicity of its construction, mechanical detail giving p aoe to mechanical action. One important result of this experiment is that it demonstrates that hitherto the speed of transmission of electric currents through a, metallic conductor has been restricted, from mechanical imperfections in the mechanism of the recording or receiving instrument, and that by the substitution of chemical' decomposition for ■ mechanical action, an- almost unlimited speed of trans-mission-may be. obtained. It -ia to.be/uopedthat this new transmitting and recording instrument may be the agent by which our present tariff of Is for twenty worda may be reduced to tid, or less, for a similar message. Scientific pro»?cesF practically applied 18 a heirloom ro a nation..

' A New Process or Fx,ouu Making — A revolution is lilwjly soon to take place in • the" pn-ci-'ss of flour unking. The grain is , crushed by numerous little trip-hdinmera, attached to the proper machinery, to produce the res i.i lt desired. The new machinery •is 'very clu"itp,J an i doea its work in a thorough manlier. The flour produced is | «aid to be far supei-ior t<> that obtained by i grinding. A p-Miuding mill, costing 1,0 Q.Q. dollars, wiil produce as much fio-ir every dciy !as an .old-fashioned mill, costing 5.000 dollars. The new "mill is \avy simple. When a hammer is out of order it can be, replaced an a trifling cost. For 4,000 years millers have produoed flour by grinding r,he grain with stones. The new idea gives a new d parture. ' What results it will,pro:duce remain to; be see i J. ="

Death of a! Celebrated Racehorse, — The '(Sheffield Telegraph ' r.eporr.3 the death. •of Volfcigenr. ' the celebrated Derby and Ldijer winner, " the pride of the Yorkshire sportsman, and one fchujbeat and most popular horse that ever trod the British turf." His leg was broken by a kick from a mare and on Saturday poor Voltigeur was shot in his stable at Aske. He was bred in 1847 by Mr Robert Sfcephensou, of Hart, and was bought when a colt by the late Lord Zetland and his trainer in Voltigeur rendered him an immense favorite for the Derby. " The tenantry on the Zetland estates backed him to a man — even the domestic servants anticipated their wager for months to come about him ; ladies maid* could not sleep for dreamiug of his success ; and a special train of North Riding farmers accompanied jhini to London." He won both the Derby and the St Leger. following up this teat by defeating the hitherto uu conquered Fiying Dutchman for the Doncaster Cup. Next year howevev,j|ue was beaten by the older horse in a memorable two-mile match for £1000 a-aide at York. Voltigeur has been a a very useful ammal at the stud, and up to the day of his death was as lively as a, yearling. Among others Voltigeur was the sire of such eele-. brities on the turf as Vedette 1 , Skirmisher Bivouac, Sabreur, Bumulekite, Geaut des fiatailles, Breunus Fragrance, and Falkland lasc year's winner of the Northumberland Plate. The late Earl of Zetland took a great pride in his favourite Voltigeur. Wnen well and at home Ins lordship- scarcely- ev«r missed a day without paying a visit to bis pet, .... ; !

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Bibliographic details

Wanganui Chronicle, AND PATEA – RANGITIKEI ADVERTISER. "NULLA DIES SINE LINEA." TUESDAY, 16th JUNE, 1874., Wanganui Chronicle, Volume XVII, Issue 2460, 16 June 1874

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1,980

Wanganui Chronicle, AND PATEA – RANGITIKEI ADVERTISER. "NULLA DIES SINE LINEA." TUESDAY, 16th JUNE, 1874. Wanganui Chronicle, Volume XVII, Issue 2460, 16 June 1874

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