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MR MASSEY ON TOUR.

In the Waipa.

Yesterday was Mr Massey’s busy day. He arrived in Te Awamutu by the 3 a.m. Wellington express, accompanied by Mrs Massey, Miss Massey, and his private secretaries, Messrs F. D. Thompson and F. W. Furby. The party was met at the railway station at *7.30 a.m, and driven to Te Awamutu Hotel for breakfast, as guests of the Town Board. Subsequently the party were shown round the neighbourhood, and at 9.30 a.m. Mr Massey received a number of deputations, introduced by Mr J. A. Young, M.P. RAILWAY FREIGHTS. Mi Wallace, acting as spokesman for a deputation from the Te Awamutu Town Board, brought up the question of railway freight on waterworks pipes from Auckland, which ha explained was excessive, being 26s per ton on cast-iron pipes, and over 33s on steel pipes, Mr Young supplemented this on behalf of other local bodies, which he said were similarly affected. ROADINC TEAS DALE SETTLEMENT. Mr Matthews dealt with the second question. He said that recently 123 acres of the Teasdale Estate had been sold for about £4OOO. No provision had been made for footpaths. They asked that £ISOO ho set aside for this. TE-AWAMUTU-PUTARURU RAILWAY. Mr Teasdale spoke on behali of a suggested railway from Te Awamutu to Fulururu, which he claimed would save a distance of 40 miles and a great boon to travellers to Rotorua as well as to settlers in the neighbourhood. The line would he of light construction and plenty of gravel for ballast and was available. If the Government were short of money lie suggested that a syndicate he given permission to build it. Such a line would tap the whole of the back-blocks country.

Mr Massey said that with regard to the first matter a freight of 2(!b 8d per ton ceitninly seemed excessive. He would submit their representations to the Minister for Railways. As regarded footpaths for the Teasdale Estate, he understood that there was a considerable surplus, and if so he would see that part of it mmo to Te Awamutu for the purpose suggested. In reference to the proposed railway route, this was quite new to him. A suggestion had been put forward that a local body should construct it, and in his opinion tlie time was coming when it would he necessary to give local bodies permission to proceed with certain lines without the assistance of the Government. At the present time the Government was engaged in the construction of important main lines. As regarded the proposed Iriai route to Kawhia, he believed that this was going to he a most important towp in the near future. However, he believed that one of these lines would he built to make communication easier between the southern districts of the Notllujsland and tho Thermal Springs district. Hu promised to go into tho matter. SOLDIERS' GRAVES.

Revs. Clarke and Wooliass asked for a grant in aid of caring lor the graves of soldiers who fell in the Maori War and had been buried in Te Awamutu.

Mr Massey replied that it was hardly necessary for him to say tiiat he was in sympathy with tiie request of the deputation. He lad been waited on in Auckland by members ot tho Victoria League ami had granted them £SOO for tho purpose of attending to soldiers’ graves. If part of this sum could not be allocated to To Awarnutu he would have £7a placed upon the Estimates next session for the purpose. trucks for metal.

A deputation from t[ie Waipa County Council, headed by the chairman, Mr Fisher, .brought up the question of the irregular supply of trucks for the conveyance of metal from the To Kuiti quarry. He also considered that Waipa should he regarded as a back-blocks district in order that to secure the advantage of smaller freights on metal.

Mr Massey replied that the question of freight hud ins entire sympathy. Thu time was corning when it would be necessary to do a great deal more in giving facilities to local bodies for making roads upon which the prosperity of the country and more particularly the dairying industry depended. lie would have much pleasure in submitting the matter to Mr Hurries in Wellington. That Waipa would bo given the privileges of u back-blocks district lie had no doubt. Mr Fraser had been confronted with rather a difficult problem, in that very little money was available. Things were now better though still not all that they could desire, but no doubt they would be able to do more fur the district next session. A LAI’S ED LOAN. On behalf of u deputation from the Rotouianuka Drainage Hoard, iMr Young explained that uu July 17th, IUII, the board applied to the Minister of Finance for a loan ot £ISOO for drainage work, which was approved provisionally. Nut being familiar with the procedure necessary in such cases they neglected to apply till October 23td, 1012. They now recognised that it would he necessary to apply for a fresh loan and asked the Premier’s support. Mr Massey promised to see Mr Allen in connection w : th the mutter in Wellington. Money was dearer than it was two years ago and they should understand that the Government would expect them to pay exactly the rate that it cost the Government. Oil AU PG POST OFFICE. Mr Bailey asked that the construction of the post office at Obaupo might he proceeded with. The Go verninent had voted a sum of J£ 1700 for the building and site. Mr Massey replied that the plans had already been prepared, and it now only remained to call tenders. He adviseu them to renew their application to the Postmaster-General. ITHONGI A MATTERS, A deputation of Pirongia settlers asked that the main coach road between Te A wumntu and Pirongia be improved and suggested a subsidy of £ for £. Mr Massey said he thought the request a very reasonable one, and he would do his best for them. It was all a question of funds. The deputation also asked that the Government might grant a portion of the police reserve as u site lor a town hall for Pirongia. Mr Massey pointed out that he was nolhead of the Police Department, but he would see what could be done. KIHIKIHI REQUESTS. A deputation from the Kiliikihi Town Board asked for improvements to the post office. The Departmental Officer hud recently inspected the building and recognised the necessity for improvements. They also drew the Premier's attention to Kewi'e house, which they stated was a menace to the neighbourhood, as natives congregated there drinking and carousing. It was now in the hands of the Native Land Board. Mr Young said that Dr. Pomure and he had Drought the matter up in the House. He suggested that the building be removed and that the land be used us u recreation reserve,

The deputation also asked for a Government grant to improve portions of Hie road from Kiliikihi to Otorohanga, and that the road running from the township to Hie river be extended to Te Pu-hi.

Mr Massey advised a renewed application in the case of the post As regarded Kewi’s house, have a report on the subliy Hie Native l ands y v. i i" 1 1 1 niiil-. i Kaw. uni- i be pie . i'iT'T'v'X ' c.uiig v.n old run w iikior a graui lor the flp i ■ mad in x I year : ■ BP'.' "on I ' ! - Hi"!‘t with

Mr Fraser about it. The second toad matter was also one for ttyo' Public Works Department and would ask one of the engineers to report upon it. Mr E. J. Walter headed a deputation, which asked for a bridge over the Punui river. Mr Massev said | he would try to have provision made for this on next year’s estimates. The deputationalso asked that roads might be constructed on the Wharepuhunga Extended Block, the money for whichwas already available. Mr Massey promised to write to Wellington from Te Awamutu so as to hasten matters. In reply to an application by Mr Lloyd for remission of rent on his land. Mr Massey said that this could probably be arranged. KAWA SETTLERS. A deputation from the Kawa settlers asked that the Government accept one of the tenders for tho construction of a bridge over the Waipa river and that the Wharepuhunga road running past the Mental Hospital and the Reformatory be improved. Mr Massey promised to do his best to facilitate both matters. THE LUNCHEON.

Mr Massey also received a number of piivute deputations and an adjournment was then made to the Town Hall for luncheon. A large number were present and the hall was decorated with bunting while a banner bore the inscription; “Welcome to the Prime Minister. The toast of the King having been drunk, Mr Wallace, chairman of the Te Awamutu Town Board, proposed the health of Mr Massey to whom, as also to Mrs and Mils Massey, he extended a very hearty welcome. He was afraid that they had given .Mr Massey rather a bad time at i tho hotel during the morning with deputations. (Laughter). There was one matter which he could not refrain from mentioning, and that was tho amount of unoccupied land round Te Awamutu. This was detrimental, not only to that part, but to the whole of the Dominion. He congratulated Mr Massey upon Ilia attaining the highest position possible to any man in tho Dominion. (Applause). Ho thought that it would be agreed that Mr Massey hud betn a success so lur. The speaker trusted that his robust constitution would not break down, and that lie would long he spared to till his present high position. (Applause). On rising to respond Mr Massey was received with loud and continued applause. He said that he was out not to make political speeches but to attend to the business of the country. He desired to thank them for tho enthusiastic manner in which they had received the toast of his health and to congratulate them upon tho progress made since bis last visit to Te Awamutu. Ihe people of the town took a keen interest in political matters and grneral y formed a shrewd judgj tneiu in that connection. Two 1 things had particularly struck him while looking round the town in the morning the wonderful growth of the place and the number of old political and personal friends he had met. He had not expected to see eo large a gathering at luncheon. He thaniced them for sending Mr Young to Parliament as member lor the Waikato. In Mr Young they had a hard-working, conscientious member. He had done excellent work as chairman of the Native Affairs Committee. Had it not been for the loyalty and solidarity of his friends in Parliament he could never have got through the past session. Though in every session there were hundreds of divisions they, had come through tho last without a single i defeat. This was a record lor the

New [Zealand Pariaraent, and ho did not know hut what it was a record for the British Dominions. It showed that the Government had the conlidence of the people of the country. The by-elections which took place at intervals were usually taken to be a sort of political barometer. Well, they had had a byelection in Taranaki, recently, caused by the gentleman who hud represented the constituency, and who was opposed to the Reform Party, being appointed to a high office in London. The people had shown their conlidence in the present Government by returning a member pledged to support it. Ho believed this confidence was due to the lact that the present Government sympathised with the dillicultits and trials of the people on the land. The prosperity of the country depended upon its settlers who were the producers. The policy ol the

Government was to assist the producers in every way and to increase the number of producers. Mr Wallace had pointed out the large area o! unoccupied land round Te Awamutu and the speaker recognised that it was the duty of the Government to put people on the land. They had been confronted with financial difficulties for when they lirst came into office they found themselves ! pledged to find large sums of money. The country was now, however, overtaking its liabilities. They had to work to provide cheap money for local bodies and for Parliamentary grunts. The Reform Party was also going to give security of tenure. By the Laud Bill of last year SSUO settlers had been given the right to acquire the freehold tenure, and the period necessary to qualify for freehold had been reduced from 10 years to six. They were nut forgetting Hie people in the backblucks, and they had made amendments in the system of balloting for luiitl by means of which a settler had a better chance each lime be went up. He again thanked them for the reception tendered him, and trusted that this would not be the last time that he would visit Te Awamutu. (Applause). Mr Fisher, chairman of the Waipa County Council, proposed the health of Mr Young, and also welcomed Mr Massey. A Minister could only realise the needs of a district by travelling through it. He paid a warm tribute to Mr Young. He

was a very ambitious young man, and the speaker hoped he would one day be the Hon. Mr Young. Mr Young thanked them for the cordial manner in which they had drunk his health and for the kind things that Mr Massey and Mr Fisher had said about him. He did not think he deserved them all, but he had done what he had to do to the best of his ability. Parliamentary life was interesting and one felt that one was working for one’s people and country. He was a busy man during the session and Hie rest of his time was taken up principally in straightening out affairs of people who were in trouble. The last session of Parliament would stand out prominently in the history of the country, and ho considered that it redacted great credit on the Massey Government. (Applause).

When the It a form Paity went into power the croakers said that the land-sharks and moneybags would now have a cut -in. This had been utterly disproved by results. The legislation put upon the Statute Book last session had for its object the assistance of the worker, not the shiraer. The humanitarian aspect of last year’s legislation was a particularly striking feature. The health of Mr Wallace was also drunk. After luncheon the parly left by motor car lor Cambridge, stopping on route to inspect the Kihikihi Post Office and llewi s house. At Moanavalo. At Moar.avalc a longer ball was culled for afternoon tea. Mr J. S. Fisher, chairman of the Moanavale Settlers' Association, welcomed Mr Massey, and expressed the hope that be would long live to fill his high office. In responding, Mr* Massey remarked bow pleased he was to see so many old friends. A deputation from the Moanavale Settlers’ Association, headed by Mr J. S. Fisher, asked that the Government should assist the settlers, in druwingjfup a drainage scheme for JM Tua Tua Swamp, which he had jBH had an opportunity of viewing,.-. H

tl tivi.uiip, ■ so i: 'ii i i/Vj- y. "jr'" \ \ 1 j- s| heci; -. .’1 ! j.; i HSI -'V/V • "S coi.aonu-ti fflH ‘ * !» i -jHI. ■ ,vT" 1 ■ •■■Sin y'\’ -V-S ,V whs i,rival "In * X', ';T |; 11 ]■■:). I i id purcbi'.'i.);' the wa drainage itself. He Mr Thompson, a drainage expert, to report upon the swamp, and also to formulate a scheme for drainage. Mr E. B. Cox advocated the formation of a Drainage Board at Mangapiko, stating that two and lhalf years ago 39 settlers had signed a petition asking that such a body might be set up. Mr Massey said that upon his return to Wellirgton he would recommend to the Minister of Internal Affairs that a board be set up at, once.

Mr W. G, Doyle, the host, then expressed appreciation of the visit of Mr Massey, who responded appropiately. At Cambridge. On arrvival in Cambridge the parly proceeded direct to the Town Hall, which was decorated with bunting. Mr Massey, on entering, was loudly chereed. Mr Dickinson, Mayor of Cambridge, extended a warm welcome to Mr Massey. (Appuse). Cambridge always had a warm spot in its heart for Mr Massey, and for his administration ADDRESS OF WELCOME. The following address was then presented to the Prime Minister by the Mayor.— To the Honourable W. F, Massey, M.P., Prime Minister of New Zealand.

Sir, —On behalf of the Citizens of Cambridge, I, as Mayor of the town, express appreciation of the honour you have conferred by visiting us,and extend to you a hearty welcome. We congratulate you on your appointment to the high and responsible ofiice of Prime Minister of the Dominion.

From your lifelong association with farming, you are eminently lilted to undertake the administration of the country's allairs, since the prosperity of the Dominion is essentially closely allied with the development of its pastoral and agricultural industry. Your practical knowledge and experience as a farmer cannot but be of advantage to the country in the framing of legislation dealing with land settlement. Uy an agricultural community such as our', you are accordingly ali the more gladly welcomed, and your visit will also enable you to renew acquaintance with many friends of your younger days who are now settled here. We feel that New Zealand is peculiarly fortunate in having a man of your attainments and experience us its Prime Minister, and the firm and capable manner in which you and your Ministerial colleagues are administering the alfairs of the different Departments of the Public Service is such as to establish confidence in the minds of the people of the Dominion that justice will be done to all classes alike. Your capable administration thus far has won the general admration of both your political supporters and opponents.

We are in thorough accord with your desire to maintain and increase in every possible way the clbciency of the British Navy, and in the visit toEngland of the Minister for Defence (the Hon. James Allen) we recognise your intention of formulating such a policy as -nay be recommended by the Home Government for assisting to uphold the British Naval supremacy. We need hardly assure you that the quesHon of the defence of the Empire is one on which persons of all shades of political opinion unite in loyalty to His Majesty the King, and to the Mother Country, and wo agree that New Zsaland should bear its full share as a part of the Empire, in ensuring that the Union Jack shall never make obeisance to the (lag of any rival nation. In welcoming you we also extend hearty greetings to Mrs and Miss Massey, and we hope that you and they, throughout the days to come, will be blessed with good health and happiness. In conclusion we Dust that you will long be spared to carry out the good work on the country’s behalf that you have so successfully commenced.

(Signed) GEORGE DICKINSON, Mayor,

Three cheers were then given for Mr Massey, who thanked them for their reception and the address of welcome. In the Waikato he had met many of his oldest friends. There was sitting in the front scut, for instance, Mr James Anderson, whom he had known for at least 35 years, ll was on account of his practical experience of agriculture that ho was able to heio the settlers. In extending such help to the settlers the Government was doing just as much for the people of the towns because the prnspeiity of the towns depended upon that of the country. (Applause). His greatest ambition was to leave (lie country better than he found it. (Applause). Mr Massey was then waited upon by various deputations. THE HUNT CLUB. The lirst was from the Waikato Hunt Club, which was represented by Mr Mervyn Wells, who stated that the club wished to be granted a totalisutor permit. He pointed out that tho Hunt Club races encouraged the breeding of Hie most useful type of horses. There were no short races on the programme of the Hunt Club races, such as appeared in (he Metropolitan race programmes, and the fact that most of the best steeplechase horses had learned the art of jumping in the Waikato demonstrated the sort of horse that was bred in it. For the three years the members of the club had found the stakes for the races, but Iho meetings had not paid their way. He believed the club would have been granted a permit, but for an accident which deprived the commissioners of the opportunity of inspecting the course, for their motor car broke down, and they did not reach Cambridge until it was dark. The course was second to none, and he trusted the Prime Minister would do all possible to have a totalisutor permit granted the club.

Mr Massey agreed with Mr Wells that hunt clubs should be encouraged, and be would do his best to try and get them granted permits if Ilia House agreed to the number of such being increased; but at the present matters appeared to bo about evenly balanced, and until a vote was taken on the subject he did not know which side would win. However, he would do his best for the hunt clubs when the time came. CHAMBER OF COMMERCE. Messrs C. H. Priestley and J. P, Asher, representing the Cambridge Chamber of Commerce, next appeared, and the former asked that a block of native land at Maungatautari, of 14,000 acres, should ha acquired by the Government, and cut up for closer settlement. He also requested that a portion of the bush there should be retained as a forest reserve. He stated there was also land at Tauwhare, owned by the natives, that should be similarly acquired and cut up for close settlement. Mr Asher referred to the mail delivery in the neighbouring township of Learointgon, which he said was not satisfactory. Tenders had been called for it, but as notices were only stuck up in the post office, there was only one applicant for tho work.

Mr MaSsey agreed with Mr Priestley that the native land should be acquired, also that it would bo well to retain a portion of it as a forest reserve, and he promised to Supycpt done to the best of bis i • iff Hie nullvc lat.ds could under the Hilo. A t h jt it (he y/ ivt»

ai the ITemier miiiu! igtmoriiil lit'iHHHH ni t ho late sop. lor ,1. y sni i ' 1.. t |.. .1 0.. c i n be;nu: done, for hc'M Qkl&mMlM work done by that ed some such recogr p. ini id that a; nr such as :,: .years, the to al l Tlhcuit one. BAD The next deputation fIHHHj a number ef members land Automobile Assoti Mr L). li. Caldwell iMcrrSH&| bad state of the main readSßSßj district, particular!v the iflH Hamilton to Auckland, and fnH Cambridge to Rotorua. He pointer out that the duty paid upon motor cars amounted to £21,000 last year, and he thought a portion of it should be expended upon the main arteiial roads of the Dominion.

Mr C. Whitney said that one thunderstorm made the Rangiriri Hills positively dangerous. Mr Career said if they had to wait for the road boards to put the roads in order it would be 50 years before they obtained any satisfaction. The Reform Government hud done much good work, and why not consummate their efforts by talcing over all the main roads aubputling them in firstclass condition. Mr Massey said he was well acquainted with the roads referred to, and sympathised with the deputation. He thought tnat ere long all main roads would be taken over by county councils, who would be responsible for their condition. He stated that the Government set aside £40,000 fur the roads of the Dominion, but it was not adequate, so if the whole of the duty paid upon motor cars were expended upon the roads it would hot nearly suffice. One of the deputation suggested that the roads should be repaired by prison labour, as had been done in some parts.

Mr Maaaey said he was not aware that prison labour hud been used for that purpose. Another of the deputation said one individual had offered £IOO towards a fund fur repairing the main roads. Mr Massey said he would guarantee that any money so raised should be subsidised by the Government to the extent of £ for £, and while sympathising with the deputation, that was as far as be could go at present. THE BANQUET. At 7 o’clock Mr Massay was entertained at a banquet, Mr White presiding. The toast of the King having been honoured, the chairman proposed the health of the Prime Minister. in replying, Mr Massey recapitulated the events of the previous session. Mr Wells proposed the New Zealand Parliament, coupled with the names of Messrs Young and Bullard, aim Mr Caldwell, the Cambridge branch of the Reform League. A SUCCESSFUL SOCIAL.

After the banquet Mr Massey was entertained at a public reception at the Town Hall. Mrs and Miss Massey were presented with bouquets by Miss Dickinson. Mr Young extended a hearty welcome to Mr Massey, and congratulated him upon tbs position which be had won by his own indomitable energy and determination. It was because Mr Massey frit that he had a mission that be had kept on. Whan Mr Massey first came into office it was said that he was not capable of leading a, party. He had since proved himself peculiarly adapted to the duties of leadership. As member fur Waikato, the speaker had frequently to consult Mr Massey, and there had never been a detail so small that ho could not give his attention to it. The Reform Party was conserving the interests of the people, and as long as it continued to do so the speaker would support it. During the short period that the Party had been in power it had done wonders in the direction of land settlement. There had been in the past such a thing as land settlement upon paper. Now people would not he settled upon land before proper access ha? given to the land by means of roads. Mr Massey, by reason of hia agricultural experience, understood the life of the man on the land. The speaker dealt with other reforms broubgt about by the Massey party.

Mr Massey, who was received with loud applause, referred to the wonderful record of the last session. In reference to the question of defence, he said that Mr Allen had gone homp to England, and he hoped that as a result a scheme would be drawn up by means of which New Zealand would bear her share of the burden of defence. He (Mr Massey) considered that they had an adequate land force, hut an utterly inadequate naval force. What was wanted was a British fleet in the Pacific, in which every ship would be under Imperial control. There must ba no half-way measures, no hesitating between two opinions. They must do their duty, and must be prepaired to make sacrifices. The people of New Zealand had always been t) the front in Imperial matters. A musical programme was contributed to by Madame Isherwood Messrs Harrison, Cameron, Boyd and London. Cheers having been given for Mr Massey and Mr Young, supper was partaken of, and the party left again for Frankton en route for Auckland, Hamilton Questions INTERVIEWED BY MAYOR At Cambridge last evening, the Mayor of Hamilton, Mr A. E. Manning, waited on tne Premier in connection with the establishment of the agricultural college at Kuakura, with his proposed visit to Hamilton to open the new public buildings, and with the loan of £25,000 for water and drainage, which was sanctioned by the ratepayers in November last. Mr Massey said that as regards the agricultural college nothing definite had been arranged. It was almost certain that be would open the public buildings, and the Mayor could get into communication with him next week on the subject. As far as the loan was concerned, the Premier held out no hope of the Borough obtaining any assistance from the State Advances Department, and it would therefore be necessary for them to take anotner pull so as to enable them to borrow elsewhere.

Vutk V. ** ,*■' Mr‘ 1 him in Mr F. W. Mayes, applying week’s holiday,—Granted. 4 Messrs J, Murrell and T. Evans, J complaining of drain in Alma-street. —The Mayor and engineer having taken steps to get the nuisance abated, their actich was approved. Mr Deo. Williamson, Hamilton East, asking the council to contribute towards the cost of upkeep of lamp.—Referred to the Gasworks Committee, with power to act. Messrs E. O’Loughlin, G. Soanes, L. Ournell, J. T. Haylock and D. Clements, applying for drivers’ licenses.—Granted, subject to the approval of the sergeant of police. Beautifying Proposals.

A conjoined meeting of the council’s committee and the Beautifying Society submitted the following recommendations :—That an endeavour be made to obtain Mr Fearson’s services to advise the council as to laying out Garden Place, the river banks and any other portions of the borough that require attention ; that the Beautifying Society’s recommendation in regard to the removal of the convenience from Marlborough Place be adopted. The proposal re securing the services of .Mr Pearson to report upon a scheme for beautifying the riverbanks and other places was adopted after a general discussion, in which Garden Place figured largely, and Cr. Tristram had advocated the employment of a local man. ther’Tj being, lie ocKsiclered, several ful'l competent io do the work. He vi in .favour of beautifying the tov.fl and thought the money availabH

should be expended in beautifying! ami not frittered away in expenses* —The recommendation re Marlborough Place was referred to the Works Committee for a report. Legal and Finance Committee.

’] bis committee reported as follows: “That a by-law dealing with open fires be made on the lines of the Wellington City Council By-laws, that Mr Fulton l«ta been written to informing him that the Council is arranging for the final settlement of accounts in connection with the bridge construction within the next few days; that Messrs. Cribble «fe Co's application be granted and they be given an opportunity of disposing of Borough ifoiiiptyre#" and the committee had no recommendation to make re. town hall seating,’’ The report was adopted and the recommendations approved. The Gasworks. The Gasworks Manager submitted the following report: — Manufacturing; Everything in this department has gone on satisfactorily. Mr -Stone, the contractor for the new bench, lias finished the erection of the arches, and is now waiting for the retorts and special bricks and tiles needed for the generator. lam raising the roof of the retort house over the new bench, and hope to have it finished shortly after the holidays. Distribution : The 12-inch main in Thackeray -Street is laid, the connections arc coining to hand, and I hope shortly to have the street closed up again. It has, unfortunately, been open some considerable time owing to the non-arrival of the connections through the s.s. Westmeath going ashore. I have'also laid the main authorised in Ohaupo Road and in Willoughby -Street. Now the connections have come to hand 1 shall be able to proceed with the 8-inch main in Victoria Street and across the railway bridge with 6-inoh. In connection with the G-inch, it is now necessary to connect through from Claudelamls to Hamilton East via Heaphy Terrace. This will cost £2OO, and I would ask for authority to do this at a convenient opportu nity with 3-iucii main. All the routine work is going on satisfactorily. The gasholder tank is now practically finished. I shall be able to give the council full particulars of the cost next month. The gas holder arrived on the 25th December, and 1 hope to have it ready for use by the middle or end of March.

The report was adopted, and the laying of the 3-inch main along Heapliy Ter rare to Clauddands aullioriscd.

The Gasworks Committee was requested to report on the- jiossibility of reducing the price, of gas for power, it being stated that there was a probability of a number of eleetrie motors being installed with the inauguration of the Frankton scheme. The Municipal Baths. Tile Legal and Finance Com mitten recommended : That by-laws for the management of the baths bo made by the council ; that applica tions be invited from married persons for the position of caretaker (services of both husband and wife to be available) at a salary of £3 per week, the engagement to bo for a period ending dOth April next.These recommendations were adopted.

In reply to a question, the clerk stated that Hie cost of tilling the bath was altout £2 10s each time, which meant'a weekly outlay of TO. —This evoked a somewhat protracted discussion, during which it was stated that tilling the hath meant emptying the reservoir, and it was eventually agreed to instruct the engineer to submit a report to next meeting as to tho best method of tilling the. bath oiler than from the mains, the feasibility of doing so by sypben from the lake, or by Shaw’s patent, being suggested. A committee, consisting of the Mayor and Crs. Booth and Uayter, was set up to deal with all matters connected with the management of the baths. Miscellaneous. The police are to be requested to take action to enforce the by-laws auent x ehicular and drivers’ licenses, as the clerk reported that so far only 1U such licenses had been issued, whereas there should have been between 50 and 60. Councillor Tristram was empowered to have the Hamilton Hast tire station section generally improved. Mr T. Knox’s account for XU Os was passed for pay meat.

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MR MASSEY ON TOUR., Waikato Argus, Volume XXXIV, Issue 5202, 11 January 1913

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MR MASSEY ON TOUR. Waikato Argus, Volume XXXIV, Issue 5202, 11 January 1913

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