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The Waikato Argus [PUBLISHED DAILY.] A Guaranteed Circulation of Over 7500 Weekly. SATURDAY, JANUARY 14, 1905.

ThEKE are risks incidental to every occupation, but those which men employed ou the railways run are high. This fact affords strong reason why every possible precaution should be taken to protect them from accident. We report in another column the inquest as to the death of platelayer Heed. The evidence shows clearly that under existing conditions whenever an engine and a jigger meet at the ■site of the accident a collision is inevitable. There is a rule that when a jigger or any other obstruction is on the line, when there is not a clear view over half a mile of road, that a man with a Hag shall protect it in front and rear. When only two men are with tho jigger this is manifestly impossible, and one of the witnesses stated that he had been many years in the service and had never seen the precaution taken. Again, the evidence of the officials showed that platelayers arc warned of the running of specials when it is possible to do so. In tho case in question the deceased and the man injured received no warning. Warning is given by placing a red disc on the tail of the train preceding the special. In this case, after the official notice, there was no train on which to place the disc. The stationmaster at Morrinsville did not consider it incumbent upon him lo take any extraordinary steps to warn the men. It would of course bo a considerable expense to put telephones into the platelayers’ houses, but in view of the fact that under existing conditions accidents arc all but inevitable if trains and jiggers meet at given places on the line it is impossible not to endorse the rider of the jury that this should be done. The witnesses were unanimous that if there had been telephones the accident would

not have happened. The evidence shows that Iho greatest credit is due I" (he engine-driver lor the promptitude with which ho acted The train was travelling about IS miles an hour, and he brought it to a standstill by means of the emergency brake in 70 or SO feet. It is calculated, after careful inspection of (be site, that only from live to eight seconds intervened between the time it was possible for the jigger lo he seen and the collision. The fault therefore is in no way with the engine-driver, and must he looked for in other directions. To our mind it consists in the absence of telephones in the gangers’ cottages.

The Hamilton Kille Cadets arc requested to assemble at the range at 2 o’clock this afternoon for class-firing. At last night’s mooting of the Hamilton Borough Council the foreman of works reported that the joists of the Hamilton traffic bridge are now so rotten that they will nut hold the spikes with which the decking is held down. In this week’s issue of the New Zealand Sporting and Dramatic Review are reproduced two of the scenes being painted by Mr Will Diamond for the Hamilton Town Hall. The scenes depicted are a garden and country lane, and both are splendid specimens of the scenic ai tists’s work. The New Zealand Egg-laying Competition Association, formed in Blenheim recently, decided on Thursday night to proceed with its competition whether the Government auspices are granted or nut. Arrangements for finance were adopted, and it was decided to procure a site at once. The Maoris are preparing with characteristic enthusiam and energy for the various canoe races to be held on Monday, 30th January, at the Bluntly Regatta, as they want to make this their first effort to manage a regatta a success, and for this purpose they have launched the famous war canoe “ Taheretikitiki,” which has been under cover for the last six years. At the Magistrate’s Court at Oamaru ou Thursday morning, Captain Wray inflicted a fine of X2 or 14 days ou Alfred Miller and George McKenzie for having liquor in their possession while thesubjectsof prohibition orders; John Ward, for procuring liquor for a prohibited person, X 5 or one month’s imprisonment; Richard Diver, for procuring liquor while prohibited, X2 or 14 days. Captain A. K. Voting, the Chief Government veterinary surgeon in Taranaki, states that 40,000 calves have been inoculated and branded since December 1, 1904, in that provincial district. With regard to the regulations, he states that it is compulsory to inoculate and brand calves up to 12 months it they are to remain in an infected district, and up to 18 months if they are to be taken to another district. On Wednesday evening next the Cambridge Dramatic Society will pay another visit to Hamilton, when they will produce for the first time here their successful drama “For England’s Glory,” which made such a sensation recently in Cambridge. The piece abounds with military enthusiasm, the plot being laid in Russia during the Crimean War. Popular prices are announced, and the box plan may bo seen at Paul’s. Tenders arc invited hy the Public Trustee tor the lease of sections 43 t, 435 and 440, Hamilton West. The property, which lies between Air T. Hill’s boarding-house and the new Town Hall ami opposite St. Peter’s Church, is very centrally situated, and should elicit considerable competition. Tenders close with Air ,). S. Bond, agent for the Public Trustee, at Hamilton ou Alonday next. Captain Prince, who has Leon interesting himself on behalf of the Hamilton Fire Brigade, wishes to acknowledge, with thanks, receqit of a cheque for XI Is from the Northern Fire insurance Company through their agents, Alessrs W. C. Davis and Co. Captain Prince is soliciting subscriptions in order to purchase a now hose reel. Already about Xl 3 has been collected, but X3O is required; however, lie should experience no difficulty in obtaining double that sum from tho business people of Hamilton.

Good progress continues to be made with the Paeroa-Waihi railway extension works, and there appears to be no doubt that the line from Paeroa to Waihi will be finished and trains running by about September. Alessrs Anderson and Co., of Christchurch, have completed their contracts for tho construction of the two large bridges over the river at Waikino and at tho eastern end of the tunnel at Karangahake. A start is to be made next week in laying down the rails through the tunnel, and the work of completing the line to Waikino will be pushed on with all possible speed. On Sunday (to-morrow) a large climax locomotive belonging to the enterprising firm of Ellis and Burnand, of this town and elsewhere, will run as a special, under her own steam, from Auckland to Alangapeehi, where she is is to be employed on the 11 miles of iron railed tramway belonging to the firm. It is over 30ft. long, and runs on bogie trucks, and its diamond smoko stack is rather over the regulation height for the New Zealand railways, so that she is coming up under a short jury funnel. The locomotive is made in America, and is a special patent expressly built for heavy slow work up steep grades that are thought to be impossible for steam. The same class of engine are in daily use on the railways to the Klondyke, and other of the mountain railways in the rougher parts of America. Alessrs Ellis and Burnand have a long grade of 1 in 15 to work over, so an ordinary loco, would have been of little or no use to them. It has attracted a deal of attention in Auckland, and has been visited by hundreds of people during its erection in the railway yard, especially by the railway loco, drivers, and their remarks have been a bit mixed, but the general opinion is that, for her particular work, she is about the only thing possible, as the heavy gearing gives her immense power, while at the same time makes her slow. She is not expected to make more than seven miles an hour ou her trip up, and she is expected to pass Frankton in the afternoon about 4 p.m. She is named “Mountaineer,” and weighs, loaded with water, c-tc., 25 tons.

SYNOPSIS OF ADVERTISEMENTS Wanted—Steady man for farm. The return of a stick is requested. Assured value iu boots at Salmon’s. Impounded at Te Awumutu—Cattle. Wanted—General servant, Hamilton. Lost from Oluuipo—Yellow sheep dog. Found iu Hamilton —Lady’s silk satchel. Tenders—Erection of cottage at Fraukton. New dress materials at A. McGarrigle’s, Hamilton. Tenders—Erection of school building, Puketaruta. hj utertaimiieut at Mataugi Hull next Wednesday. “ For England’s Glory ” at Hamilton next Wednesday. Bonita Sowing Alachiuos at Kaiapoi House, Hamilton. Te Awauiutu Town Board—Special meeting re half-holiday. Clearance sale of drapery, etc., at Hamilton- Cullen uuil Co. Full stock of groceries and fruit—H. 11. Yeats, Hamilton East. Te Aroha Agricultural and Horticultural Show on February 9th. Hamilton Borough Council—Special meeting re half-holiday. Good all-round value iu suits, shirts, hats, at Kaiapoi House, Hamilton.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/WAIGUS19050114.2.7

Bibliographic details

Waikato Argus, Waikato Argus, Volume XVIII, Issue 2782, 14 January 1905

Word Count
1,510

The Waikato Argus [PUBLISHED DAILY.] A Guaranteed Circulation of Over 7500 Weekly. SATURDAY, JANUARY 14, 1905. Waikato Argus, Volume XVIII, Issue 2782, 14 January 1905

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