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THE ENGLISH DERBY.

By Rugby

(From the " Australasian") London, June 12. There were many hundreds who visited Epsom Downs last week who had spent years in India and various other tropical climates, one and all of whom agreed that they never underwent such a grilling in all their lives before. To say that it was hot is to give no idea at all of the scorching fiery furnace that appeared- to surround us on every side. The air was hot, the ground hard as iron, and hotter than the air, which the gentleman who registers the temperature of the British Isles informs us was five degrees above the average of the last 50 years. No wonder, then, that on arriving at Epsom on Tuesday we found the running track mure like a turnpike-road in a hard frost tliau a racecourse, for ib was as slippery a3 glass, and round Tattenharn Corner, and all about the grand stand, there was scarcely a blade of grass to be seen. However, the horses had arrived, the prizes were large, and there were plenty of jockeys ready to risk their necks. Harking back a little before recording the busy doings of the week, I must note that Reverberation, after being almost knocked out for the Derby, had come back to 20 to 1, but that Feu d' Amour, from whom I and many others had expected so much, was hopelessly gone. This being the third first favourite that M. Lefevre had supplied for the blue riband since Christmas that has been sent to the right-about, the great French owner must be a great benefactor to the book-makers. Feu d' Amour, however, was a dead 'un, and no body appeared exactly to know with what malady he had been afflicted. Some said he had been beaten to fits in MsHtejal, others affirmed that he had been t^Pßctim of an accident, and that, instead of a tonic ball, a physic one had been given him — not a very likely mistake iv a well regulated stable, I should think while a few, with venom on their tongues, declared that metallic fever was the cause of his fall ; which, aa M. Lefevre is said not to bet a shilling, is also improbable ; but gone he has to all eternity — whether he was ever struck out I do not know, but he was as good as boiled, and his stable companion, Ecossais, was again brought back 100 to ' 9 taken freely. In the meantime Couronne de Fer, the property of that popular young nobleman and thorough good sportsman, Lord Rosebery, was said to have done anything he liked at home with Aldrich, the City and Surburban winner, and one or two others in a sort of trial, and he was in great force ; for after he had been backed at 8 to 1 and 6 to 1, six monkeys in one hand, and several other minor beta at the same odds, were taken about the reputed roarer. Mr. Merry also showed signs of again providing a. great favorite, after last year carrying off the prize with a rank outsider for Glenalmond, it was whispered, had made mincemeat of Doncaster and Peto, and was backed by the followers of the " boy in yellow" with such spirit that he reached 9to 1 taken. ' George .Frederick was very firm; not so, however, was Atlantic, who got frightened during his journey in the train, and plunged and kicked so violently that he knocked out the window of his box, and damaged his

off fore knee considerably. The other favorites were pretty steady, while Miss Toto and Apology were running a dead heat in the Oaks betting, in which, also, the Irish mare, Lady Patricia, was making a rapid advance. The guests at late dinner parties and the guy and festive attendants at Cremorne had scarcely reached their diggings for the night when a most unexpected heavy fall of rain set in, which, lasted for three or four hours, washed the dirty streets, laid the blinding dust, partially improved the course, and caused considerable surprise to several thousands when they looked out of their windows the first time on the Derby morn. The journey down by both road and rail was consequently most agreeable, and the supply of vehicles at the stations at Epsom being quite equal to the demand, the tariff was considerably lower, and the grand stand gained with little trouble and great comfort. On arriving at that imposing-look-ing edifice we found that several fluctuations had taken place in the betting, which, however, need not detain us, the prices laid at the start being sufficient now all is over. The first race, the Epsom Town Plate, attracted very little notice, and that Queen of the Chase won it, beating Puzzle, Belle of Scotland, and eight others, is all 1 need say. An hour's interval before the Derby gave plenty of time for a careful inspection of all the 20 competitors — a good many more of which than usual, however, were not worth looking at, and why Selsea Bill, Algebra, Sir Arthur, First Lord, Whitehall, or Belford, were ever started is a mystery I shall never be able to fathom. The Heathhouse lot of four were awfully mobbed ; Atlantic's off fore knee was still much swollen, but he walked sound. Aquilo pleased many, among whose ranks I numbered not myself. Trent (whom everyone was delighted to see carrying Cannon, already recovered sufficient to ride, although looking pale and ill), seemed fie and well ; and Leolinus was the idol of a large number, who will have a better chance of winning when they back him after he has had a little more work. CouronnedeFerdid his trainer the greatest credit, and was trained to hr.lf a minute, but George Frederick was the king of the party, and moved about among the crowd as though conscious of his coming victory; no horse showed more improvement, and although a wiseacre (?) remarked in my hearing that he was lame, I doubt if ever a sounder horse won the Derby. The preliminaries were soon over, and the following score at the post for the 95th celebration of THE DERBY STAKES, Of 50 sots, each, h.ft. For three year olds ; colts, Bst 101 b; fillies, Bst 51b. The second, received 300 soys, and tl»© third 150 soys out of the statf>«- About a mile and a hnlf -•"""aiig at the New High .Level starling-post. 212 subs. Mr. Cartwriglit's eh c. George Frederick, by Marsya3 — Princess of Wales - 1 Lord Rosebery's br c Couronne de Fer, by Macaroni — Miss Agneß - - - 2 Lord Falmouth's eh c Atlantic, by Thorraanby — Hurricane - - - - 3 Lord Falmouth's br c Aquilo, by Tborrnanby- -Siberia ... o air. Cartwright's b c Yolturno, by Maccaroni—Fairwater - ... 0 Col. Cavleton's cli c Reverberation, by Thunderbolt — G-olden Horn - - 0 Mr. J. Jolinsfcone'a b c Tipster, by Adventurer — Sporting Life - • - 0 M. Lefevre'B eh c Ecossais, by Blair Athol — Margery Daw - - - - 0 Mr. Merry's b c Glenahnond, by Blair Athol — Coimbra - - - - 0 Sir R. Bulkeley's eh c Leolinus, by Caterer Tasmania - ■» • - - 0 Mr. Evington's b c First Lord, by Stockwell — Vlie 0 Mr. W. R. Marshall's br c Trent, by Broomielaw —The Mersey - - 0 Mr. Johnstoue's b c King of Tyne, by Tyneclale — Lady Ripon - - - 0 Mr. F. Q-retton's br c Algebra, by The Duke — Egyptian. - - - - 0 Mr. Bowse's b c Whitehall, by Lord Clifdeu—Old Orange Girl - - - 0 Mr. W. Hall's b c Selsea Bill, by Exchequer — Southern Cross - - - 0 Mr. Peddie's b c Sir Arthur, by Arthur Wcllesley— Volt .... o Mr. Fisher's eh c Rostrevor, by Thormanby — Lady Augusta - - - 0 Mr. I'Anson's b c Belford, by Rataplan — Bonny Breast-knot - - - 0 Mr. Savile's b f Sister to Ryshworth, by Skirmisher — Yertumna - - - 0 Betting. — 9 to 1 agst Glenalmond, 100 to 15 agst Aqnilo, 7 to 1 agst Couronne de Fer, 9 to 1 agst George Frederick, 11 to 1 agst Leolinus, 100 to 8 agst Atlantic, 16 to 1 agst Ecossais, 20 to 1 agst Tipster, 20 to 1 agst Vertumna filly, 22 to 1 agsfc King of Tyno^3 to 2 agst Reverberation, 33 to 1 agst Kostrevor, 40 to 1 Trent, 40 to 1 agst First Lord, 100 to 1 agst Algebra, 100 to 1 agst Whitehall, 100 to 1 agst Selsea Bill, 100 to 1 agst Sir Arthur — all taken. One slight failure preceded a splendid start, every horse jumping into its sti-ide at the same instant. Tipster, however, soon carried his colors to the fore, followed by Volturno, who could not get to the front to fulfil his mission of making play for George Frederick. However, the pace was good enough, and King of Ty ue an( * Atlantic headed the front rank, which was composed of Whitehall, Trent, Selsea Bill, Rostrevor, Glenalmond, and Couronne de Fer ; Algebra, George Frederick, Leolinus, Belford. and Sister to Ryshworth being the rear guard. Ecossais ran into the front at the City and Suburban starting-post, and Georse Frederick improved hia position quickly as they ascended ihe Mil at the mile post, where Tipster, Volturno, and King of Tyne were racing for the lead, followed by Couronne de Fer and Ecossais ; next came George Frederick, and Trent, Atlantic, Aquilo, and Leolinus in a cluster together. The first to fall out was Tipster, who stopped as if he was shot, and he- and Reverberation were seen no more in the run. Descending the hill to Tattenham corner, George Frederick took close order with Volturno, King of Tyne, and Ecossais, who were still the three leaders, but they soon split up, for half way down Ecossais dropped back, and was soon lost in the ruck that swept past him . When they got to the bottom of the hill Custance set George Frederick going in earnest, and he was soon alongside his stable companion, who was directly after done for, and the Derby of 1874 was to all intents over, for without being approached he won very easily by two lengths, a neck between second and third. Leolinus, Trent, Rostrevor, and Aquilo passed the post next, and as the judge could not place a fourth I shall not, although some think Leolinus occupied that position ; Sister to Ryshworth was eighth : next, a long way off. was Selsea Bill ; then came King of Tyne, Sir Arthur, Algebra, Volturno, Ecossais, Glenalmond, First Lord, Tipster, and Whitehall , and Reverberation and Belford, last of all did not pass the post. The value of the stakes is £5,350, and the race is said to have been run in 2min 465., •which, is under the average.

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https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/TT18740829.2.18

Bibliographic details

THE ENGLISH DERBY., Tuapeka Times, Volume VII, Issue 386, 29 August 1874

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1,760

THE ENGLISH DERBY. Tuapeka Times, Volume VII, Issue 386, 29 August 1874

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