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SOLOMON'S TEMPLE.

CIPHER IN THE BIBLE. AN EXTRAORDINARY STORY. An extraordinary story is told by Router's correspondent at Helsingfors, apropos of the excavations and investigations lately undertaken in connection with Solomon's Temple at Jerusalem. It is stated that tlie work is being carried out by the Hon - _on agu Parker's party on lines suggested by Ur Walter H. Juvclius, a Finnish scholar, who has made a special studyofcel- - branches of, Hebrew arcliffioo Dr Juvelius, in the couise oi nis studies for his diploma of £ Philosophy, interested himself in tlie study of "Jewish history, and P larlv Jewish chronology. In the couise of these studies he found ti aces of what he believed to be a very comph rated cipher, which was m pait used in the Hebrew texts. He then turned his attention to the Talmud, and found there in the Book of Misclina _an indication that, hidden m the B°°k of Esekiel and m certain of Moses s Books, were valuable sacred secie_ts which could be declared to no one. In bis continued research lie found in the Book of Ezekiel, in cipher, a description of a secret hiding-place in Jerusalem. In order to check this information Dr Juvelius then turned Ins attention to tlie Book of Moses, as a consequence of the hint in the Talmud that these books also contained valuable information in the_ same cipher, and bearing on the location of the hid-ing-place, although shorter than in Ezekiel. Still further proof is alleged to have been found in the fragment known as the Book of Jesu ben Syrak. h r L/iNG-PL ACE OF THE TEMPLE. The information contained by the cipher was: — ... 1. That there was a secret hidingplace in the rayon of Mount Orpnel, certainly containing the fables or the Law, the Temple Archives, and the Temple Treasures. 2. That this hiding-place was connected with the blood canal used for the carrying off of the blood of the sacrificial offerings in the Temple. 3. That this hiding-place was m connection also with David's City. It is not stated in the cipher that the blood canal and David's City were m direct communication, though this is probable. , T 4. That David's City was on Mount Orphel. 5. That the immediate entrance to the treasure chamber was through a cleft deep down in the rock, which was filled up at the time of the hiding of the treasures, and must consequently first be cleared out by any explorers. 6. That the blood canal stood in connection with the Temple water system. 7. That there were three approaches to the water system and thence to tho blood canal. One of those was through the Temple itself, now the Mosque of Omar, and another near to the Virgin's Well (discovered by Sir Charles Warren). The third approach was at a considerable distance, and in these days unavailable.

Dr Juvelius as long ago as 1906 point, ed out tlio impossibility of using the Mosque entrance, and advocated tlie explorers concentrating their efforts on the entrance near the Virgin's Well. That the Dlood canal was of considerable size may be gathered from the fact that at the consecration of the Temple oxen and 18,000 sheep were slaughtered as sacrifices by King Solomon. So much for the origin and contents of the cipher. That the effort to disoover the hid-ing-place was worth making Dr Juvelius declared to be certain. Any exact description of the supposed contents of the secret chamber would be impossible, but it was understood that the treasure alone to be found there would be worth several millions of pounds. Jesu Ben Syrak's book states very definitely that the contents of the hiding-place certainly include the Table of the Laws, hidden there until the coming of the Messiah. In addition, it is practically certain, according to the cipher, that the secret place contains treasures of almost incalculable worth, as well as manuscripts ~d archives of the very highest scientific value. Included in the cipher is a curse, " sixty and six-fold," on any unauthorised persons who may attempt to disclose the secret chamber.

EXPEDITION EQUIPPED. At first the idea of a cipher as discovered by Dr Juvelius was scouted by all to whom ho mentioned the matter. He himself had not the means to equip an expedition to prove his theory. Through the kind offices of friends in Finland he was, however, brought, in 1908, into contact with a Swedish engineer named Millen, at that time resident in Copenhagen. Through him a certain Lieutenant Hoppenrath, not unknown in the exploration of the Congo, was interested in the matter. Through the latter communications were entered into with Captain Parker in England, and iu the summer of 1908 Dr Juvelius was called to England, \?-here the question of a syndicate to examine into the matter was mooted. A preliminary expedition to Jerusalem was undertaken, where Dr Juvelius pointed out the exact place on which, according to his theory, explorations should be commenced. On his return to England a syndicate was formed, permission being in the meanwhile obtained from the Turkish Government to carry on the operations. This consent, was not given platonically. The representatives of the Government received half of the shares of the company in consideration of their consent.

In August, 1909, the first excavations were begun in the greatest secrecy and under various subterfuges as to the real object of the expedition. The actual direction of the affair was at that time in the hands of Dr Juvelius, but, as he was by temperament unfitted for the active work of exploration, he handed over the leadership to Captain Parker, in December of that year, leaving as his local representative another Finn, Mr Pertti Uottila, During the whole time of the excavations, Dr Juvelius has been in close connection with the party, and has been kept constantly informed of the progress made, and has been frequently invited to advise them, on the future operations. The two objects kept in view by the party have been : 1. Tho location of David's City on Mount Orphel as described in the cypher. 2. The location of the blood canal of Solomon's Temple. The achievement of either of these objects would bring the expedition appreciably nearer its goal—the secret luclinsr-place of the Jewish treasures. About the middle of April, Dr Juvelius became invare that the efforts to approach the hiding-place from the two outside entrances could not be successful for a considerably longer period. It was his opinion at that time, and he expressed it to the syndicate, that the only course left open to the party to attain their goal ouicklv was to moke an entry direct into the blood canal, if this could be accomplished.

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https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/TS19110711.2.25

Bibliographic details

SOLOMON'S TEMPLE., Star, Issue 10202, 11 July 1911

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1,121

SOLOMON'S TEMPLE. Star, Issue 10202, 11 July 1911

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