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SCIATICA FOR 17 YEARS.

JOHN HUNT, HASTINGS. "' CRIPPLED AND BED-RIDDEIJ. HALF MAD WITH PAIN. DOCTORS FAILED TO CUBE HIM. ACTIVE AS A BOY TO-D-X . • DB WILLIAMS' PINK PILLS. "All the neighbours used to watch for the doctors' coming and gfomg, to hear how I was •when I was down wk_ one of my bad attacks of 'Soiatioa," said John Hunt, an old-time dr_v»r who has settled down in Hastings after having travelled, over and over again, every inch of the Hawke's Bay District. "For seventeen years I never got through a Winter without being- laid up with it for weeks on end. The pain was awful. Often I nearly went wild with it. You .couldn't pay me to face the agony of that Sciatica again — but. thank God, there's no need. Dr Williams' Pink Pills cured me for good five years ago. "It was away back in '62 that I started to suffer, about seven years after I c-ame out from Scotland,'' said Mr Hunt. "I was droving at the time — and one night I camped, like a fool, on a heap of wet ferns. Next morning I woke up with a tingling pain in the back of my thig_. TbaA was the start of the Sciatica that came near to costing me my iife. The pain spread down my legs and up into my hips and the small of my back. Every move sent a burning stab clean through me. No torture could have been worse. I could no mote get. up into the saddie than I could fly. It was as much a« I couid do to walk. My knee was drawn up, and 1^ oould just put my toes to the ground. It would have torn the leg off me if I had tried to walk straight. The pain was more than I could stand. It took all the heart out of 'me, and I dreaded an attack like death. As Boon as I got over one attack I lived in dread of the next. Each time the agony was worso -than it was before. Day and night it never let up on me for a minute. I could not even sit up on a chair, for it just caught the nerve and sent the pain tearing up and down my leg. Often I was a-s good as crippled. I could only hobble along on crutches. It took me over an hour to go 100 yards. When a bad turn came on I couldn't even do that. I went down on the flat of my back in bed, fairly paralysed with the pain. "Time and again my neighbours have sat up with me all night trying all manner of things to , ease my terrible pain," added Mr Hunt. "I had the nest doctors in the Hawke's Bay district, but they couldn't do me any good. They blistered me and physicked me — but the pain was just as bad as ever. ! I could never tell you how many pounds I spent on plasters -and stuff to rub j into my leg — but it was just throwing my ] money away. My muscles were all drawn up and twisted, and the agony was cruel. Dcy and night I lay there on my back, moaning and groaning*, the pain ripping down the back of my thigh and into the oalf of my leg. When ft caught me behind the knee I had to yell out. No matter if I h/y in one position 'all day without moving a muscle, the Sciatica still kept gnawing and burning away at my leg. The nerve was all red and swollen, and I couldn't bear even the bed-clothes to touch me. At last the muscles of my leg started to waste away, and I made up my mind that I was crippled for life. "That's just what I wou!d > have been if it hadn't been for Hobson, a- friend of mine up in WaJtotara. He swore by Dr Williams' Pink Pills, and he said there wasn't another -medicine under Heaven that could ever get Sciatica or Rheumatism out of the blood. I took his advice, and hobbled up to Eccles' chemist shop for haif a dozen boxes of Dr Williams' Pink Pills— for I knsw they had no chance if I didn't give them a fair trial. The first; box gave me a great appetite — and before I had finished the third the pains ea^ed Ufp a- lot. I picked qp heart then, and. kepi . on- taking Dr Williams' Pink PiMs steadily till there wasn't a pain or an ache left. I didn't have to^ finish the fifth box before I was on my feet again, as lively as ever. I felt as fit to jump a barbed wire fence then as I did twenty years ago. And what's mo-re, Dr Williams' Pink Pills cured me for good. Even in the Winter I never have a" twinge of pain now. Ask almost anyone in the Hawke's Bay district what cured John Hunt's Sc atioa, and they'll tell you Dr Williams' Pink Pills." Dir Williams' Pink Pills for Pale People cured Mr Hunt because - they went straight down.- _^a~,£he-- v ioot -.- of;.- -his- trouble- -"in ->aUr'\ blood. They actuality tnake new bloodjust that, nothing more. They don't aot on the bowels. They don't tinker with mere symptoms. They won't cure any disease thai isn't caused by bad blood. But then bad blood is the cause of all common d.seases like anemia., \ headaches, .indigestion, bad liver, nervousness, neuralgia, sciatica-, rheumatism, lumbago, backache, kidney trouble, and the special, secret ailments of growing! girls and women whose health plainly depends upon the richness and regularity of their Wood-supply. Dr Williams' Pink Pills have a marvelous power to cure all these ailments. But get the genuine pills. Sub- ! siitutes never cured anybody. You can order the genuine pilis by mail from Dr Wi'iiiams' Medicine Co., Wellington, at 3s a box, six boxes 16s 6d. post free. Medical advice free. 783. . I

some time, Lochiel is once more at the head of the list. With a total of £21,462, secured by 49i winners in 144 races, he has beaten his record of a year ago by nearly £4000. His chief winners were Tartan (£5202), Marvel Loch (£4494), Scot Free (£1980), and Bellis (£1260). As was the case last year, Grafton fills second place, with £17,588, and if he had no big winners to help him, he claimed 65 winners of 144 i races. Wallace was third, with £11,991, Lady Wallace being responsible for £5524. After this trio came Simmer, £9609; True Blue, £8213; Medallion, £6600; Positano, £6569; Little Bernie, £6131 ; and Haut Brion, £6097. Multiform had five representatives, who captured £4115, and further down the sires mentioned include Seaton Delaval, £3650, and Soult, £2804. At the sale of Mr J. Musket's stud in England early last month the total realised, was £63.760. BaroneEG La Fleche, by Ladas — La Fleche, who ecst 5200 guineas as a yearling, was sold to Sir R. W. B Jardine for 7500 guineas, the same breeder also securing La Force, by St Simon — Mnirninn, for 2600 guineas. Lord Derby gave 3200 guineas for the Melton — Schoolbook mare Princess Melton, who was sold as a two-year-old for ' 15,000 guineas. Ihje stallioncs Admiral Breeze, by Velasquez — Seabreeze, and Orion, by Bend Or— Shotover, were purchased for Hungary, and Flying Fox's brother, Flying Lemur, by Orme — Vampire, was take?i by 'a German breeder for 7500 guineas. >

Opportunity counts high in this workaday world, and without opportunity among his own kind a thoroughbred stallion becomes a mere cypher among his Jellows (writes "Milroy," in the "Sydney Mail.") Horses and men we have known in plenty, who began the world with everything in their favour, but quite failed to attract notice. Then there have been many horses that might have equalled the stud records of Stockwell, - had the same opportunity been offered, instead of working out their salvation among half-breds. Though Musket was an excellent stayer, and a horse of . good reputation among the notbing-succeeds-like-success sportsmen and breeders of England, he failed to establish himself in his own country as a stud horse, for, notwithstanding the fact of having sired a winner of the Two Thousand Guineas, he had quite outlived his racecourse reputation, and was looked upon as hardly second-class before he was sold into New Zealand. His opportunity came by a fluke among flukes. For his magnificent muscular development and extraordinary bone he was purchased to beget carriage horses in New Zealand. Had it not been for. the efforts of Mr Joseph Bennett and Mr Thomas Morrin this great son of Toxophihte may have ended his days in the carriage horse line, and his name lost to the present generation. Thoroughbred mates were. provided for him, and evidently the journey from England and the more generous climate of Auckland brought to the surface dormant powers, -for he sired better horses than himself in Carbine, Trenton, Nordenfeldt, and Martini-Henry. How many horses like Musket bare there been in our time lost to the world on hack stations siring stock horses? Neckerssat was one famous stallion at least, who narrowly escaped banishment to one of Sir Thomas Elder's stations, but it was Mr. Elworthy, I ' think, who brought about his recall .and .establishment in the once famous Morphetville ptud, and he lived to make a great name for himself a© a sire. Who among the many that knew St Swithin in New Zealand ever expected him to rise higher than a thirty shilling country stallion? As ,few, no doubt, as ever dreamt that Traducer would rise from a five shilling fee to 260 guineas a mare. - There is not enough room for all. Only a small percentage of thoroughbred stallions are needed with the first-class studs, and the others must, perforce, earn their living in humbler spheres ; but as no man can tell good from bad until they are tried, many brilliant gems, no doubt, are yearly cast out in favour of mere paste.

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Bibliographic details

SCIATICA FOR 17 YEARS., Star, Issue 8702, 16 August 1906

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1,672

SCIATICA FOR 17 YEARS. Star, Issue 8702, 16 August 1906

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