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SPORTING NEWS.

FAR AND NEAR. (By THE POSSIBLE.) The scratching of Haydn for all engagements at the Grand .National meeting, which was announced last ; week, did not com© as any surprise, as . the recent form of the Sou -Wester j gelding was e» poor as to suggest that . he must be looked on as a light of other ; days. His absence from the approach- ; ing meeting, however, is a matter for some regret, as he had been a regular competitor for several years past at the winter carnival at Riocarton, where his efforts had been attended with a good measure of success. He made his first appearance in 1901, when, carryI ing list, he beat Long Tom, The Hem- ■ pie and eight others in the Grand National Hurdle Race. On the la6t day of the meeting he carried 12st 51b and won the Sydenham Hurdle Handicap, Long Tom and The Hempie again following him- home. A year later he made his first effort over big country, when he won the Grand Na.ional Steeplechase under lOst 91b, Pipi and The Swimmer following him home. In 1903 he was weighted at 12sf41b, and finished third to Awahuri and Pipi, finding come consolation on the la6t day, when he won the Lincoln Steeplechase, with 12st 91b, in the saddle. In 1904, when Slow Tom won, he carried 12et, but feld at the pcst-and-rail fence the first time. In the Beaufort Steeplechase he was second, with 12st 51b, to Phaetontis, and Eclair beat him in the Lincoln Steeplechase, in. which he was also weighted at 12st 51b. Last year, when carrying list 81b, he finished second to Innuskillen in the Grand National Steeplechase, winning the Beaufort Steeplechase on the second day day tinder list 121 b. Despite his fall two years ago, Haydn was one of the safest horses that has eesayed the Riocarton country during recent years, and there have certainly been few niora consistent performers over the local steeplechase course. L. K. iiewitt had a bad time at the Victoria Racing Club's Grand National Meeting. On the second day he rode Lord Allendale in the Welter Handicap, but, though the horse was a hot favourite, he finished nearly last. On the third day of the meeting he had the mount in the July Handicap on Palindrome, who was equal favourite with Haphazard. Turning for home Palindrome was in front, but nearing the winning-post she deviated from her course, and, though she won by half a length, she was subsequently disqualified for interfering with Retrenched to whom the race was awarded. ll Terlinga," after mentioning that the stewards were in the best position to see what actually happened, said: — "On th© lawn, from where I saw the race, Hewitt appeared to flash his whip in front 'of Retrencher, but I could not detect any interference, and I fancy Palindrome won on her merits." The " Australasian," commenting editorially on tho incident, said that Hewitt "certainly flashed his whip in E.e~> trencher's face. That he actually interfered with Retrencher we would not like to say, and Palindrome won handsomely at the finish; but the. stewards were better placed to see what happened, than the people on the stand, and they decided that Retrencher was entitled .to;the race. ' Probably the decision was a good one, but it was in direct opposition to the verdict; given on the same course in the cases of Pat and Hautvillers. The disqualification of Palindrome was unfortunate for Hewitt, who is going to England to follow his profession. Palindrome, when pinched, has a way of edging out from the rails, and Hewitt probably could not help her doing this, but, in consideration of his going to England, j.t was bad luck for the New Zealand jockey to have a mount of his disqualified for interference." F. Dunn, the jockey, who rode Wakeful in most of her races, died at the Melbourne Hospital last month, at the age of twenty-three yeans. His death was sudden, and, writes " Terlinga,*' the ending sad. Dunn began his career as a email boy at St Albans, and he was a favourite of Mr Macdtonald's. The first animal lie looked after was Miss Carbine, and as a very little chap he won a race on her > at Geelong. Later on Mr Maodonald gave him nearly all his riding, but, unfortunately, success upset Dunn, and his employer fait obliged to part with him. Dunn wa6 a good horseman, and no one.oould ride Wakeful as well as he did, but, as often happens, he came to the front too early. The head was too young to stand winning big race after big race. He got to think that he knew more than his owner, and lost races through not riding to orders. In the Melbourne Cup in which Wakeful ran second he was told on no account to come to the front before the distance, but he took the lead half a mile from home. Up to the time he left Mr Maodonald 's stable Dunn always looked after " Old Mother," as the boys called Wakeful, and he was most attached to the mare. The races he won for. Mr Macdonaldincluded the Melbourne Cup, Sydney Cup and. Newmarket Handicap. The last Engliah mail brought full particulars of the race for th© Grand Prix do Paris, in which the CaTbine colt Spearmint, following up his Epsom Derby victory, broke the spell of bad luok which, has attended the efforts of English horses in the big French face during the last twenty years. The field numbered thirteen, England being represented by Spearmint and Malu-a. The latter was ridden by the American, D. Maher, while B. Dillon had the mount' on Spearmint. Thea - e was an enormous attendance, the crowd numbering about a quarter of a million. Misfortune frowned on Malua in tho draw for places, as he was on the extreme outside, while Spearmint wa6. fortunate in securing the place, next but one to the rails. Spearmint was etxm taken to the front, and made practically all the running. At the top of the hill, seven furlongs from home, there was, a shout that Spearmint was beaten, as Dillon was seen to raise hie whip. 'Racing down tlhe hill, however, he still field a clear lead from Narvaez arid Flying Star, with the French Derby winner, Maintenon, in 'hopeless trouble. . Rounding the last turn tho leadter had to withstand the first of many challenges. In succession he disposed of Flying Star, Narvaez and Fellah, When well in Hue for horn© Storm made his effort, and when he reached Spearmint's girths Dillon^ had his mount under the whip. Riding without spurs Dillon was hard at hie mount for more than three hundred i yards, and scarcely, had he shaken off Storm than Briseeoeur appeared on the outside. Fox • a few strides the issue hunig in the balance. The French colt, however, could never quite get on terms, and being kept at it right to the poet Spearmint won by half a length. The victory was very popular, even the French eportsmen paying a rousing tribute to Major Loder'6 colt. An enormous amount of bettinj; took

i — place on th© race, the pari mutuels handling £90,120, as compared with £49,911 last year. In the inside euclosuTe, where Major Loder invested £7000 on his colt, the winner started at 10 to 9 on, but on. other parts of the course his price was returned at 2 to 1 fgai-net and 14 to 5 a-gainst Recent mail advices bring brief particulars of some of tibe principal events at the Ascot meeting in June. . For •the Ascot Gold Cup there were five starters, the betting being 11 to 4 on Pretty Polly, 7 to 1 agst Bachelor's Button and Cicero, 40 to 1 Achilles, 500 to 1 St Denis. The last-named made the running to tOie straight, wiiere Pretty Polly and Bachelor's Button passed him. In a strongly-run, race Pretty Polly compounded inside the' distance, and Bachelor's' Button won cleverly by a length, witlh Achilles five lengths away third. The field for the Royal Hunt Cup numbered twenty-two, and Dinneford, who started at 100 to 15, won by tlnree-quartetrs of a length. The Ascot Stakes, a two-mile handicap, was won by Pra-della, by Tarporley— Poppy? who was credited wi-tih covering fhe distance in 3min 19 2-ssec. The Coronation Stakes, for three-year-old fillies, was only a canter for tlhe Oaks winner, Keystone 11., who is now favourite, at 5 to 2, for the St Leger. Lord Rosebei-y won the Coventry Stakes with Traquair, by Ayrshire — Chelandry, and the New Stakes fell to Captain Greer's Slieve Gallion, by GalUnule—Reclusion, both-, victories being gained . very •easily. Traquair and Slieve Gallioii had been previously successful earlier in the season, and they are looked on as two of the beet twoof tibe-, present season. .^ Cairbine got another lift last week, whien two of his colts, in Gingal and Haytor, finished first and third respectively in the St George's Stakes, for three-year-olds, at Liverpool. Though nominally. a race run under scale weights, the penalties and allowances are of 6uch a nature that there is provision for a margin of 221 b, certain winners being' penalised 121 b, while maidens are allowed 101 b. Gingal did a fair amount of racing as a two-year-old, but did not win a race, two socondra and two thirds being hip record out of six starts. Notwithstanding his want of success, however, he showed good form, among the honses he beat being Flair, Troutbeck, Black Arrow and Admirable Crichton. This season he had run well more than once, three races falling to him. He was at one time a strong fancy for classic honours, but last week's race i 6 quite his best performance to date. Prince William did not race as a two-year-old, and he probalby claimed a maiden allowance in last week's contest. Prince William's pedigree is interesting, his sire being Bill of Portland, whose stock aire go well known Lti tLe colonies. Haytor was not named last season, but as the Carbine —Hear Hear colt "he took part in five races as a two-year-old.. After being twice unplaced he finished third in the Surrey Stakes, and then won the Hpughton Stakes at Newmarket and the Anchor Nursery Handicap at Liverpool. I have received from Messrs Barnett and Grant a copy of their handy little publication "Form at a Glance," whidii is now issued "for the tenth year. As usual, moist of the space is taken up with the performances of the horses entered for the New Zealand Cup. There is also a large amount of other information of interest to the sporting public, including list of racing dates and table of past winners of big races. . Carbine was at tihe head of the winning stallions in England when the mail left, five of his representatives having won stakes amounting to £7942. This totaJ does not include Spearmint's Grand Prix de Pai-is, which was worth £10,008. With the exception of a small stake worn by the aged Powder Puff, Carbine owed his place entirely to three-year-olds. Gingal's victory at Liverpool last w&ek would assist the .New Zealand-bred sire. The profits to be made out of horseflesh are wonderful. Within the last few years —since 1903—the French sportsman M. Blanc (who gave £39,375 for Flying Fox) has disposed of seven stallions (four by "Flying Fox), the sum realised amounting to no less than £145,000, and he still retains Flying Fox and his best, eon Ajax, who has never been beaten. Viniciua was ©old for £16,000, Quo Vadis for £20,000, Caius for £12,000, Gouvernant for £24,000, Adam for £15,000, Val dOr for £31,500, and Jardy for £31,500. 'Vinicius was bought by the_Frenoh Stallion Depots, Caius by Germany, Quo Va-dis by Russia, Adam by Mr A. Belmont (Amerioa), and Val dOr and Jardv by the Argentine, which recently acquired Diamond Jubilee (£31,000) and Pietermaritzburg (£15,750). The pedigree of Spearmint contains no Galopin blood, and none of Hamp--ton or Bend Or, but Stockwell and Newminster (the grandsire and sire of the Borses just named) are to be found, and, in fact (says the " Field "), Spearmint has three strains of Stockwell. one of Stockwell'a half-brother, King Tom, five of Touchstone, and three of Melbourne, while he has some Blacklock blood if the pedigree is taken right back. To have a new strain or line of Eclipse in a Derby winner, even if it comes from Touchstone, is most satisfactory, and it is 'also matter for congratulation that the importing, of Carbine by the Duke of Portland has at last been rewarded. Of all the colonial

sires brought to England during the last dozen years, only Carbine has been at all successful, and his successes hay© hardly been in keeping with his groat form on the other side of the world. It is probable that the influence of Australian blood will be more felt in the next generation of thoroughbreds, and it is worthy of note that Carbine had been a dozen years in this country before he achieved a classic winner. The following remarkable incident, relates the "Special Commissioner" of the " Spo-rtstnan," has a special interest for colonial readers, as it relates to the Australian-bred mare Amiable, who won the Newmarket Handicap in 1898 : — Anyone who has had long experience of blood-stock breeding must 1 have found that many unexpected things happen, but I have never known anything co curious in this connection as I now proceed to relate. Australian sportsmen will all remember the onoe flying mare, Amiable, by Lochiel. She I was by far the speediest animal in { training ir^ Australia some ten years } ago. When, however, ehe was brought ! to England by Mr Patton she went ut- : terly off colour, and trainere could make nothing of her. More than that, when it was thought that ehe would at . least make a fine brood mare, hopes were again disappointed; her system had become so disorganised that' she de- | clined resolutely to have any part or ! lot in tho proposed new phrase of her ! life. Season »after season vain attempts were made at Newmarket to reduce her to reason in this matter. The very sight of a horse she regarded a 6 unendurable. At last she was given up as a bad job, and com© one hunted her for a 6eason or two. Then she came into the possession of Mr G. Ehlers, of the "Deutscher Sport," who tried to have her mated with Orvieto, but she would not be a consenting party. La6t year Mr Ehlers sent her to Pastisson at Cobham, and there, after she had proved as obstinate as ever, she was put under the influence of a drug, and an alliance was effected. This was> in March last year, and she was later on turned out in what is called the Little Park, a fifty-acre paddock round which a river runs. She proved to be barren to Pastisson, and this year Mr Ehlers took a nomination to En Garde for^her. Curiously enough, for the first time in her life, she showed no objection to the horse, and was duly mated on February 27 last. Now comes the strange part of the trtory. She was turned out as • before, but was taken up again about a month ago into one of the boxes, as she was not doing well, and her teeth needed attention. Once or twice Shipley said to me that ehe was going to be all right this time, for she was already showing to be in foal, and one night last week, the sth inst, ehe actually / produced a lively little brown colt ! It was more than four months out of date as far as Pastiason was concerned, co could not posibly be by him, and, of course, her this year's mate, En Garde, was out of the question. What possible explanation was there of such a phenomenon P At last the scales fell from our eyes. Mr W. Bellamy occupies the land on the other 6ide of the river which surrounds the Little Park, and one night in July last year eo-me stock whiph ne had turned out thete got across the river in a shallow place, and were found in the park next morning. Among theme was a yearling colt by Collar out of Wearing of the; Green, and it -is now as plain as a pike-staff that in this young gentleman the old mare at last found her affinity, and he succeeded where all others had failed these many years. No one at the time dreamed that such a thing had happened, but happen it did- beyond all question, and the date tallies correctly with the birth of the foal. The yearling, now two years old, is named St O'Brien, and, though backward as j-efc, he 6hows some racing promise. Not the least remarkable incident of this strange history is that the old mare should under the circumstances have readily accepted the services of En Garde this year. The foal is very small, but it looks like living, and its future career will be watched with uncommon interest.

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SPORTING NEWS., Star, Issue 8690, 2 August 1906

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SPORTING NEWS. Star, Issue 8690, 2 August 1906

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