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SPORTING NEWS.

|; FAR AND FEAR. r (By THE POSSIBLE.) , The secretary of the New Zealand Racing Conference forwards an advance copy of the Rules of Racing, as adopted «b the sitting of th« Conference last month. In the meantime, however, the ijookis incomplete, as the index is not v quite ready yet. The Rules are set out under the various headings, and the Arrangement is a very handy one, xio difficulty being experienced in finding, ijie rule bearing on any particular point. The preparation of the index will soon be completed, and copies of tlie volume, with index attached, will be available in the course of a 'week or iwo. •, , ♦■.'"/ ' . '. : ■ , : - .-■{; ■. ■-. Some time ago a statement was made to the effect that. Mr G. Palmer intended engaging a light-weight rider . in England to do his riding during the coming season. J. Nolan, the jockey in question, arrived in Christchurch last week. He served his apprenticeship with W, Nightingall, who is re- | ported to have stated tiat Nolan is the .best boy he has ever had under him. He 'cannot ride below; seven stone, winch Was against him in England, but he liad shown himself to be a fine horseman, strong, determined and a - good judge of pace. Nolan's opening < efforts ;iri this country are certain to be carefully watched. , All doubts regarding the genuineness if the ruanirig in the Victoria Racing, Mud's Grand National Hurdle Race. ,ftave now ''been set at rest. In that taoe "York, carrying 9st 121 b, won. by three lengths from Old Chappie, with Adjuster third. A few days later, with list lib on his back, York was beaten ) by half a neck by Marmont in the Doutta Galla Hurdle Race,. the pair finishing . two lengths behind Florin . The distance of that race was two miles ; and a quarter, but York's performances in the two Grand National Hurdle Races show that staying is his forte, An over the- long course at Caulfield on; Saturday he easily, held his opponents; *t bay at, the finish. York, who was 'hied at Bundoora Park by Mr J. Y. gjnith, was sold as a yeariing for thirty guineas. His sire, Tostig, is . making quite a name as a sire of jumpers, which is not surprising, coming as he does from a jumping family. / br6eding of York, on the dam's side, is o| partwular interest to New Zealand- • Conclusion, his dam, is a^daugti-; ier of Nordenfedt's brother Enfilade j

and Result, who in turn is a daughter of Realisation, the dam of Maxim and The Possible. York js engaged in the Caulfield Grand National Steeplechase on Saturday at list 121 b, and a.s the country is not beyond the powers of a good hurdler he may add another big race to his already oreditable record. Marmont's performance on Saturday i- was full of merit, and it is evident that he is still the champion hurdler of Aus- ! tralia. To carry 12st slb into third place was no mean performance. The Goodwood Cup, which was decided last ' weelc, dates back to 1812, or five years after the Ascot Gold Cup was first run."- Some first-class horses appear in the list of winners. Isonomy won in 1879 and St Simon in 1884, while in later yeare Martagon (the sire of Martian), Florizel 11., Count Schombr-rg (the sire of Black Arrow) and Merman have carried off the prize. Ihe conditions of the race, however, preclude tiie possibility of its ever seriously rivalling the Ascot Gold Cup, for whereas the latter race i& decided at set weiguts the conditions of the Goodwood Cup with regard to penalties and allowances are such that it is very much in the nature of a handicap. An apt illustration of this is furnished by the result of last week's race. The three places were filled by four-year-olds. Red Robe, the winner, claimed a 161 b allowance through not having won a race of a mile or upwards. ..henry the First, as a winner of a race of a mil« or upwards of the value of 2000 soys was penalised, and Rydal Head carried 71b extra as the winner of a similar race of the value of 1000 sotts. It is somewhat of a coincidence that these three horses, with Persif, should have comprised the field which took part m the Fifty-First Triennial Stakes at Ascot in June. The weights were practically the same as last week, but at Ascot Henry the First 9st 81b won in a canter from Rydal Head 9st 31b, Red Robe 7st 101 b beiug test It is evident, therefore, that Red Robe has come on in the interval between the Ascot and Goodwood meetings. His victory last week would probably be a big surprise, as he had no form to recommend him as a likely winner of such an event. In furtherance of its decision to exercise better control ovei- country racing the Victoria Racing Club has forwarded a circular to all provincial • acino- institutions for their future guidance. The circular sets forts that all programmes shall be submitted to the governing body, when applying for racincr Jates; not less than £o0 shall be given fc- any one day's racing: not less than four races shall be placed on a programme for any one day's racing; no race shall be run under five furlongs, except for two-year-olds; one race of a mile or over must be provided lor in each day's racing; no stake shall be less' than £10, and no stake shall be less than £20 for any jumping race; races shall not be run upon any course which is less than seven furlongs in .'length.' The minimum amount to be distributed in stakes in one day is fixed at £50, but while the Victoria Racing Club is generally commended for the action it is taking to control country raoing, it is thought by most of the critics that it would have been better had the minimum been fixed at £100 Recent' advices from Sydney show that -the horse - -breeding industry is about to be gone into on an extensive scale, and with this end in view a

large company is in course of formation. The capital, it is understood, is to be £350,000, and it is to be floated in England. The object of the company is to breed horses on a large scale, and sell them on,' the spot, first, hand, to the Indian Government, or anyone else that will buy them. In the past the Indian and South African, and later, the Japanese, markets, have provided .an outlet for Australian horses, but the middlemen's profits have been considerable, and the company now being formed proposes to do away with this trouble. The feature. of the Ascot meeting was the phenomenal success which attended the efforts of Colonel W. Hall Walkers select team. Not counting two animals that are "kept for leading work, Colonel Hall "Walker has only six horses in training. Five of them ran during the first three, days of the meeting. Black Arrow, Sandboy, Cherry Lass and Golonia captured some of the richest stakes offered for competition, and the fifth representative, Merry Moment, was only, just beaten in heir engagement. The sixth member of the team, Golden Table, was to run on the last day of the meeting. Thus, in the space of four •days, Colonel -Hall Walker exposed his full hand, and with unexampled success. Colonel Hall Walker recently started a small stud in Ireland, and all the horses he has in training were bred .there. At the time the last mail left

England he was easily at the head of the winning owners for the present season. At the Manchester meeting in June, the principal event on the concluding day was the Salford Borough Handi- I cap, of six furlongs, for which the- field numbered ten. A sti'ong favourite was found in Charcot, who, despite a 61b penalty for a win at Epsom, which brought his weight. up to Bet 41b, won comfortably. Charcot, who is an aged horse, by Gay Hermit— Nesta, was bred in South America, and after proving the champion of his own country, , he was sent to South Africa, where he also earned distinction as the best lacrfiß in that country. Commenting on Chareot's win at Manchester, "Vigilant" made the following refer en oes to foreign bred horse's :— The victory of Charcot calls attention to our decidedly insular habit of underrating horses that aye bred abroad and gain a reputation there. Were it not for this foolish idea we should not hays seen Charcot handicapped as a moderate animal before he had even run in England. That he was a good one in South America w.as well known, and, ©o far as could be judged, he was even better after his change to South Africa. Anyhow, he was out by himself the best in that country, and. being removed from there when at the very top of his form, h© comes to England. What reasonable cause is there why he should not under the circumstances have been given 9s- in our handicaps until such time as bis merits had been fairly tested here? I confess f. isee none, but our handioappers in their wisdom assumed that, being a foreigner, he must be from 141 bto 211 b of a good one, with th» result that we have now seen him make light of a 61b penalty and win a 1000 soys handicap. It might turn out that Chan-cot is the beet miler in England for anything that tho ha,ndicappsrs know to the contrary, for ttoh o prevalent idea thai h& doss not get a mile is quite opposed to his South African record, which shows that he can win under heavy weights over an even longer distance. In Souru America it is considered that about seven furlongs is his very best distance, but he may have gained somewhat in stamina during his sojourn in South Africa. In any case it is certain that no horso can get the mile on the Johannesburg racecourse without being well able to stay that distance in any part of the world, for it is a very severe mile indeed. A 101 b penalty will raise Charcot's Royal Hunt Cup weight to 9t»t, and if he is sent to the post he will have plenty of .backers, but possibly one of Mr George Lambton's other candidates has 'been reserved for that race. It may be remembered that Australian horses were in the first instance treated contemptuously by hahdicappers, who afterwards rushed to the opposite extreme when Merman, Ma luma, The Grafter, Newhaven, etc., had frightened them, though as far as Merman was concerned he really was fairly handicapped on his form as shown Jn England, only he kept on continuously improving to the very end of his racing career, when .he was eight Veavs old, 1 ( and hanciieapp^s could hardly be expected to allow for that. There can, inrlwd, be no manner of doubt that Merman when he won the; Ascot Cup was at least. 21 Ib better than when he won the Gesarewitch; indeed, his trainer. -W.. T. Robinson, assured me spme time before Merman's final triumph, that the oM horse was considerably better that year than he had ever been. We have come to have a wholesome fear of French horses that are sent over to run here, but, as a. rul<* Che foreign-bred one is treated as something necessarily inferior.

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Bibliographic details

SPORTING NEWS., Star, Issue 8390, 9 August 1905

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SPORTING NEWS. Star, Issue 8390, 9 August 1905

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