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SPORTING NEWS.

FAR AND NEAR. (By THE POSSIBLE.) A few days ago I saw a paragraph In an exchange to tho effect that accommodation had been engaged at Randwick for four of Mr G. G. Stead's horses. Having also heard at the end of the week that Mason was under orders to leave for Sydney at the end of this month, I made inquiries from Mr-i Stead as to bis intentions with regard to an invasion of Australia in the approaching spring. As . a result, I j learned that Mr Stead has come to no definite decision yet. His inclination is to *nake the trip, and to that end I he has scour-cd the refusal of four j boxes. The recent bad weather, however, has interfered with tho work of the horses, and has prevented Mr Stead from arriving at a satisfactory opinion regarding their abilities. A final decision will probably be arrived at within J the next week. Mr Stead informed me that in the event of the .trip being undertaken, the team would bo confined to descendants of Multiform, in Nightfall, Sungod, Noctuiform and perhaps Porcelain. I was informed, at the same time, that Golden Knight, the Wallace — Aura colt, has proved a great / disappointment to his connections, and at .present there seems no chance of his earning much distinction on the turf. The trouble which arose in Melbourne last week regarding TJp-to-Date and Sultana draws pointed attention to the ignorance of many owners as to the Rules of' Racing. Messrs W. Lyons and Alister Clark, the owners of Up-to-date and Sultana respectively, Bhould know the rules under which they are racing, and under tlie circumstances -Mr Clark is not deserving of any sympathy in having Sultana disqualified after winning the Kensington Steeplechase through the fact that a certificate of identity was not forthcoming, as required in all cases for horses foaled out of the Commonwealth. Mr Lyons was more fortunate with regard to Up-to-Date, but it was enly after two meetings of the committee of the Victoria Racing Club that it was decided to accept a cable from New Zealand as sufficient identification. The Auckland-bred horse was finally allowed to start in the Grand In atonal Steeplechase on Saturday, but though he got round safely he could only finish seventh. Up-to-Date and Sultana were not the only New Zealand-bred horsss that were affected in Melbourne last week by the rule requiring a certificate of identification in the case of all foreignborn animals. A private cable received on Saturday has been placed at my j disposal, from which it appears that similar trouble arose over Machine Gun. As the horse was allowed to start in the Lawn Handicap, however, it is apparent that his owners must have cabled to New Zealand, and his case was probably dealt with at the same time that Up-to-Date was under i consideration. The trouble over the certificate was not the only matter mentioned in the private cable from Melbourne^ information being also conveyed to the effect that an offer or £1500 had been refused for the son of Hotehkiss— Rubina. Th owners of Machine Gun must be allowed to know their own business best, but it strikes me that this was a pretty good pronfc on the amount they expended in the horse's purchase about two months ago The fact of the offer being declined suggests that Machine Gun must have, fehown his connections something pretty cood since he was landed in Australia, and all I hope Is that the results will prove that they were well advised in. deciding to hold on to the crack sprinThe Princess of Wales' Stakes, which was decided last week, is one of the three "ten thousand pounders run each season in England. It is run over a mile and a half course, and is open to four-year-olds and upwards. Originally there were 208 nominations, but at latest advices this number had been reduced by withdrawals to nineteen. Those left* in included St Amant, John o' Gaunt, Henry the First, Darley Dale, Rydal Head and St Dems, who were among tho best of last seasons three-year-old colts. St Dems started in promising style last season by running third to St Amant and Jonn o Gaunt in the Derby, and later on he filled fourth place in theSt I»e.eer. In his two subsequent efforts he failed to reproduce his earlier form, but his latest performance suggests that' he has come on since he war. last out. He would, however, be in receipt of allowances in last week's engagement, ami as the field was probably weak., there may not have been 1 so much merit in the win as might appear at first sight. Exchequer, th<* second horse, can only be classed as a moderate- horse, and Lancashire, after showing promise as a two-year-old,' has since degenerated into a useful handicap performer. Tbe Eclipse Stakes, the second of 'the ten thousand pound races, will bo decided next week, but the three placed horses in last week's event do not claim engagements in it. Brief particulars are to hand regarding the Derby. Oaks and Coronation Cup, the three principal events run at the Epsom Summer Meeting. For the Derby thero were nine starters, the betting being: 11 to 4 on Cicero (by Cyllene— Gas), 4 to 1 agst Jardy (by Flying Fos— Airs and Graces), 33 to

1 Silver Streak (by Soliraan — Bimetallic), 50 to 1 Sigiiorino (by Best Man — Signorina), Rouge Cvoix (by Bend Or — ■ Dame Agneta). and Shah Jehan (by Persimmon — Shewbroad). 08 to 1 Liao (by Ladas— St la), 100 to 1 Golden Measure (by Floriz-el IX. — Fairy Gold), 200 to 1 Leopold (by St Frnsquin — Mar ken). Javdy, who was coughing before the start, raced with Liao into the straight, where Liao fell ' back beaten. In the dip Cicero was shaken up, and, being baulked on the inside, came round his field and won by threequarters of a length from Jardy, who beat Signorino by. a head. Tlie Oak 3 attracted a field of twelve, Cherry Lass being favourite at 5 to 4 on. Queen of the Earth led for half a mile, when Cherry Lass took command, and won by three lengths from Queen of the Eartn, with Amitio six lengths away third. The Coronation Cup, for three-year-olds and upwards, special weights, with allowances, run over the Derby course, was confined to three runners, but they were a high-class trio — Pretty Polly, the champion three-year-old filly of lastseason j Zinfandol, probably the beet old horse in England; and Caius^ one of the best hor3e® in M. Blanc's stable. Pretty Polly was favourite at 9 to 4 on, and she won easily by three lengths, Zinfandel beating Caius by five lengths. The time for the race was 2min 33 4-ssec, as against Cicero's 2min 39 3-osoc in the Derby, and Cherry Lass' 2min 38soc in the Oaks. Tbe performance of Pretty Polly should effectually settle all doubts as to her claims to be regarded as a particularly high-class mare. Up till this season sho had competed chiefly against animals of her own age, but in beating Zinfandel and Caius so easily she demonstrated that she was something more than the best of a weak lot of tbree-year-olds seen out last season. Since running second to Pretty Polly at Epsom, Zinfandel has won the Ascot Gold Cup. Pretty Polly held an engagement in this race, but it will probably be found that she was not a starter, as ifc is Lard to credit that she would be beaten out of a place. Several New Zealand-bred yearlings which are now owned by Australian sportsmen figure among the entries for the Australian Jockey Club's Derby, to be run in the spring of 1906. These include Mr J. Mayo's br f Maori Girl, by Stepnialc— Lady's Maid; Mr W. T. Nowlan's br c St Francis, by Sant Ilario — Strathspey; Mr J. G. Robertson's br g Katanga, by Hotchkios — Crescent ; Mies M. G. Robertson's eh f Gretchen, by Phoebus Apollo — Lady Augusta ; Mr J. Wren's b o Gapon, by Menschikoff — Suuningdale; and Mr J. Wren's b c Winchester, by Hotehkiss — Edith. Cureton. In addition, some New Zealand owners appear in the list-. The Hon J. D. Ormond has nominated the following five : — Br c Zimmerman, by Birkenhead — Solitaire; b c Cantor, by Birkennea d — Guitar; b c Idealist, by Birkonhead — Ideal ; b o Idaens, by Birkenhead — Mount Ida ; and eh c Golden Gate, by San Francisco — Roie. Mr G. G. Stead is represented by two : b c Seal Rock, by San Francisco— Mies Gladys; and eh c Huascar, by Hotehkiss — St Elyn. ' Other New Zealand entries are Mrs I Davies' br g Loongana, by Soult — Curacoa; and Mr W. Davies' br g Turbine, by MenschikofF— Signet. Prior to the declaration of the weights for the various spring handicaps, there was a good deal of (speculation among the Randwick trainers, writes "Pilot" in the Sydney "Referee," as to how the imported honsa Condor, by Gallinule — Tragedy, would be treated, a>nd the probabilities are that' the- majority thought he would receive a little more than has been the cass. He Avon the only race in which he star tad as a two-year-old in England— -a minor event at Sandown Park — and tSen, though great things were prophesied for him on the strength of that victory, combined with the fact of his being a brother to Wildfowler, he was a failure as a three-year-old. He started four times at that age. and the only race in which he ran even decently wafi the Lennox Plate, one mile and a half, at Sandown Park, in which, with Bst 111 b, ho finished fourth, ttie winner being Fowling Piece, 9st 111 b. His last appearance was in a mile handicap at Newmarket, when, with 7st 111 b (minimum 7st) he finished eighth in a field of fifteen. He was then thrown out of work, and, at the sale of Mr J. R. Keene's horses the following season, was sold for 35 guineas — a big falling-off from, the 2500 guineas he cost .that owner as a yearling. On his arrival in Australia, W. Duggan trained him for some time, but he developed lameness, and was thrown out of work. On his return to Randwick he was taken in 'hand by I. Earnshaw, and though at one time he seemed to again show lameness, ho appeal's sound enough now, and is looking very well. He is a bright chestnut, with a lot of white about him, and is a particularly stylish-looking horse. Despite hia failures in England, there is no doubt he can gallop, and if he keeps sound he will probably win a fair race for his joint owners, Meeers R. C. Allen and F. M'Donald. However, even if Condor never wins in Australia, he should be very valuable at the stud, taking a line through the success his brother Wildfowler is achieving in the same direction in the Old Country. In a recent issue of the " Sydney Mail," in the course of an article on tho improvement of utility horses, "Milroy" makes the following remarks : —The question of taxing stallions is distasteful to men who keep a good article. They argue that it is inequitable to burden them because others through greed or ignorance keep useless weeds. The worst offenders in this direction are the financial institutions that own so much of pastoral New South Wales, and

It is a matter of indifference to them whether a good or bad class of horse is raised. They breed to supply their stations with horses j and sell those that they do not require. If a profit is forthcoming, well and good ; if not, what does it matter. The whole outfit is cheap, and consists of probably' fifty third-class mares, worth about £6 a head, and a £50 stallion, the upkeep of which costs, for grass and interest, under £20 a year. The man who keeps the good class of mare and stallion objects to be taxed because such people as these are lax, and care not a button if there were no horses, for if they were not to be had cheap bicycles would do as well. There is a d«al of debatable matter in this stallion tax question. It would be unfair to tax the owners of Martindale, Merton, Havilah, Belltrees, Widden, Turanville, Biraganbil, Guntawang, Gordon Brook, Dyraaba, and other hovse-breeding estates, as th© owners of them have for a generation been striving strenuously to improve their horses by using the best stallions for ths purpose. It is, somehow, like tasing industry to keep an army of drones in idleness. A friend of mine suggests a way out of the difficulty. Grade each breed of horse, such as Suffolk, Clydesdale, trotter, light harness horses and Arabs, into four classes. The first to go free of tax, the next grade to pay a small tax, the third a larger one, while the fourth should be bo loaded as to make it unprofitable to keep. The idea is good; but who is to do the grading? Men who are capable of doing this kind of work properly are not the sort to give their services to the Government, and as there ar© so few in the population of the State that could, off-hand, define the cardinal principles in horse-breeding, it is very unlikely chat any system of grading would be a success.

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https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/TS19050712.2.58

Bibliographic details

SPORTING NEWS., Star, Issue 8366, 12 July 1905

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2,245

SPORTING NEWS. Star, Issue 8366, 12 July 1905

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