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FAR AND NEAR.

" <By THE POSSIBLE.) ./ The weather was perfect for the IChmtchurch Racing Club's meeting on Saturday, and a large'crowd was present at Plumpton. Speculation, how--BVer. was only moderate, the totalise %pr investments, £3679, being £620 less than the amount 'handled laßt year. jHcing cpmmenoed with the Highlight Handioap, for which Royal Orown and The Mohican were the only . *l»»p backed. Sarange* mad© the run'ntng, followed in the early part by Rgral'Crown, The Mohican and Nanoe The last-named was beaten at fibe half-mile post, and turning for jbdme •fchere was not much to choose beStoeu granges, Royal Grown and The j&fobloan. ■ From this point Royal Crown Sad the race in hand, and he ran home ifc; ootnfortable winner from Saranges* She went to the post for the Maiden {Handicap, Black Diamond being made \» hot favourite. At the business end, 1 Ifiptwrer, nothing had a chance with ■ Wfcipayer, who won very easily; The vwisne? bore a well-trained appearance, TOt her previous form was-far, fronx ai>■<saqtivfe< Methven, a fine-looking' gelding by Conqueror, will probably be seen tp more advantage later on. He look* the sort that might dp well as a TOjnperi Blaok Diamond looked too bjjg> but Grpsvenor was in good trim, »gd ibaped "fairly. Escort ;.tan w«Uf for j fire furlofigs, when he dropped out very ' suddenly. - He may be worth keeping 1 on later on. The Christchurch Aufuinri Handicap attracted a field of XOne, and the race proved one of the .-■_', knbst interesting ever, seen .on this i ' ©durte. Speculate and Lady^ Lyonors carried. on the early running "from Tispi* and Ability), and half a mile from home Antigone and De la Rey joined "tSbie leading division. A little further on Abfiiity drew out clear, and turnings for home.he had an advantage of ttrp lengths from Tirole, with De la ; feey ojose up, and Calibre and Glanburn making their* efforts on the outside^ At on© point it looked as if the two last-mentioned might prove* dangerous, . But Ability held his, own, and won by j tiro lengths from Tirole, who was, followed by Calibre, Olanbiirn and De la Xfcey; Tirole ran well under.his big height, and Calibre also made a good SibwiL after getting a ibad passage. G|anburn was going , strongly at the • "feitrn^ and with a more powerful 1 horsetti^n mi the saddle he might have been dangerous. Speculate and. Antigone both faded .out at the end of a mile, an 3 Stepdancer never looked like win- : ning.. ; There were only four starters ' In tji« Flying Handicap, 'and for a for- | lpnji they ran along in a line. Then Sa^y dTew out, followed by Tessera. (there was no change till a hundred yards from home, but when Tessera put in a challenge she quickly settled fiandy, who was beaten by .a length. Bfat w»nt to the post for the Hack Han- '■ x dioap. Melinda was left at the post, i and Mango also lost some ground at the; start, but he showed some pace, " and was quickly on" terms with the V readers. Turning for home, Blythemaid . tehbi out, and easily holding her own, ' lie won by two lengths from Bayonet. Good Sight, who began , slowly, was finishing very fast, and she should not be long before she is returned a winner. The' field for the {Welter Handicap numbered eight, and Wet Blanket led praciibally from Start to finish, winning by three lengths from Antigone. '^ The llUwiirds Fere not satisfied -wigi the Vanning of Maniess, who finished'third. »An inquiry was oominenced, but was adjourned tUI Tuesday. The first of the English three-year-•«ld olassic races, the Two Thousand Quln«aa, tfas .decided last Wednesday. It latest adyice& it was expected that MU.E.Blano, the French owner, would be represented by one of his unbeaten FlyiniFox colts, VaL dOr or Jardy, tut there seems good reason for be- . fwiring, from th© result of the race, that neither of ihfim took party .»» fftody Showed .himself immeasurably Superior to S^gno)fina; and Llangibb^ ■■* lart autumn in- the Middle Park Plate, and itwa's reasonable to expect that he wouW^again defeat thorn. We shall, ; fcbi^vw^navetfl• waitfspme weeks be*ow;*h9 detailMrf the? race are avail. •Vie. Vedag, the winner, was a good kwrformer as a two-year-old. Hejstart- | M. oft by winning the Brocklesby Stakes *t Lincoln, Sefton Park Plate at LiverpooL Stud Produce Stakes at Sandown i Park and Twotfear-old Phite at Kemp- -I ton' Park. Up io'this, ;however, he had too* met anything good. Considerable interest attached to the Coventry tuskes at Ascot,, in which Vedas met Cipero, who also held an unbeaten cerJificate. Vedas started favourite, but . Sperobeat him by two lengths. After tniß Vedas won the Royal Plate at Windsor and Molecomb Stakes at |3po^.Wobd. r He then ran third in the Gimorack Stakes^ presenting weight to all tv opponents; fifth in the Imperial j Produce Stakes ,at Kempton P»rk i | ■gain giving away;-weight; and second.! to Standen in the Chesterfield Plate at Derby, the winner being in receipt of 141 b. Signorino, was bred by hi* owner, mi whose colours the colt's dam, Sig T taorina, ran some good races a few, years fcg*. tast season he won the Triennial

Produce Stakes at Newmarket. Probably his best -performance was finishing a dead heat with Shah Jehan for second place ;i» the Middle. Park Plate, won by Jardy, Llangibby being fourth. Llanglbby, who is a stableniate of Pretty Polly, was a fair performer last season. He won the New Stakes at Ascot and the Exeter Stakea at Newmarket, and .also put up one or two other decent performances. He was, however, not a high-class colt on hia snowing as a' two-year-old. Apart from the doubt as to the presence of the French colts, last week's raoe was inconclusive regarding the merits of the three-year-olds, as Cicero was not engaged in the Two { Thousand Uuineas. W£ shall, therefore, have to wait for the dicision of the Derby before a good line can he obtained about this season s three-year-olds. . f There was nothing of special merit among the two-year-old fillies that raced in England last season, but the place-getters in the One Thousand Guineas were by no means the. best of them. Cherry Lass, who is in- the same stable as Vedas, though in different ownership, won the Mersey Stakes at Liverpool, Anglesey Stakes at Curragh and Free Handicap at Newmarket, but there was nothing striking in any of these performances, as she did not meet any of the good ones of her age, and in some of her other engagements stie was beaten by horses with no pretensions to good : form. Koorhaan was decidedly moderate, her only win being in the Old Nureery Stakes at Newmarket, in which a very poor lot finished behind her. Jongleuse was also a long way below first-class, two small stakes being all that she secured. By the time Oaks day. come* round some of the other j fjllies may be in better form, but it seems pretty safe to predict that the fillies will not prove serious rivals' to the colts this . season, as was the case last year, when Pretty Polly was admittedly the best of her age. ! Sydney papers to hand by the last mail bring details of the annual yearling sales, which appear to have been quite as successful as usual. With few, exceptions anything choice sold well, but there was not much demand for the useful sorts. The sensation of the first day was the .price obtained^' for the brown colt, by Grafton — Lady Trenton, the dam of Strata Florida, Lord Cardigan and ' Dividend. He was started at SOOgs, then two lOOg bids were called, after which some crossfiring began with 50g bids between Mesrs R. G: Casey, F. M'Evoy and Sir Rupert Clark*. • At 1750gs the colt was knocked down to Mr F. M'Evoy , who was acting for Messrs A. S. Chirnside and H. A.. Army tage, two Victorian sportsmen. ."■■■.. The" oolt will go into P. T. Heywood's stable-, at ; Caulfield., The price given for him is the highest: that has been ; obtained for a yearling in Sydney since 1882, when Warwick, a brother to. Richmond, re-, alised 2000gs. The second best price of the day, 550gs, was paid by Mr ; W. Noake for the colt by Orzil—Kettledrum, and therefore, full-brother to a decent performer! in Kilfera. A finelooking brother to a recent .winner in Jargoon, by Positano— Jacinth, excited s&cSe competition, and Ttfas eventually knocked down to 'Mr H. R. Dixdn, apatron of I. . Foulsham's stable,; at : eto^^^^^uriihup, of....y^toria,g»ve 300gs for a good-looking colt by Balmeny— rDrummer; Girl, by Marvellous—Regalia, and at a like price Dr E. Fraser purohased a filly. by Skopoß-r-Mersey's Daughter, by; Trenton—Mersey. The colt by Positaflo— Molly Masham, by Curfew— Lady Dorset, which went to Mr J. C. Williamson at 270gs, was regarded as the bargain of the sale, many good judges expecting him to- figure. next to the Lady Trenton colt in the matter of prioe. . On the second dayr bidding was again i brisk, and prices were good. A magnificent colt, a full-brother to Hautboy, by Haut Brion— Meridian; by Marden— Sunstroke, was knocked down at 950gs to James Scobie, acting for Mr William Bailey, of Ballarat. The highest price was realised for a fine-looking halfbrother to Great Scot^ by Grafton— - Scotch Maty; by Clan Stuart— A ye Maria. Ho was started at 600gs by Mr A. Tuille'i but the running was immediately taken up by two trainers, I. Earnshaw and J. Scobie. At 1300gs Mr R. C. Allen joined in, and he eventually secured the colt, at 1420g5; on behalf of a Victorian owner. Like the Lady Trenton colt,' sold on the first day," he goes into a Caulfield stable, as I. Foulsham will have the training of him. The next sensation was provided by a handsome colt by Wallace— : Memah, by Grand Flaneur — Utopia. He was started mildly at 200gs, but bids came quickly, and finally, after .a ! duel between Sir Rupert Clarke and | the Randwick trainer, W. Duggan, the latter secured him at 1250g5. A likelylooking colt! by Graf ton— D/ama', ,by Trenton, was taken by the Hon Agar Wynne, at 400gs. Mr J. Turnbull gave 300gs for a colt, by Simmer— Carbelle, by Carbine, and Mr T. F. Scully 360gs for a colt of" Simmer^-Sheba, by Santa Claus; Considerable interest was.manir" fested in the yeartings by Sir Tristram, and all of them realised good prices.. A colt from Grand Dove, by Grand Flaneur, was taken by Mr S. Miller at 380gs, and a colt from Diana, by Goldsbrough,. by Dr E. Fraser, at 260gs. On account of Mr J. B. Reid, the Stepniak Lady's Maid filly was sold to Mr J. Cameron, for 80gs; , Stepniak— -Cobweb colt to Mr E. W. Hocking, West Australia, for 80gs; and Sant Ilario— Strathspey colt to Mr W. Brerinan, for 7ogs. ' The betting regulations in Austria are very stringent. The Austrian .Jockey Club has recently issued an important document, which will be of special interest" to al\ who follow this subject. The chief medium of betting in -Austria is the totali'sator, but bookmakers are permitted to ply their calling provided they hold a license from the Austrian. Jockey Club. The license issued to bookmakers provides, , among other things, that the bookmaker shall pay the sum of crowns' (about £208) for each day's racing in Vienna,' and 3600 crowns (about £150) for each day at two othei places. This sum jnus£ be paid. eVen in case of absence. Bookmakers Ire forbidden to " aot as agents for bets to be made in the totalisfctor, or to own racehorses or a share in racehorses^ or j in' any way to possess an interest in

racehorses. They are also forbidden to own or have an interest in any sporting publication, or to act as editor or correspondent to a sporting paper. The licensed bookmakers, will be provided with a list of persons with whom they are forbidden to have any betting transactions whatever. Every bookmaker must deposit with the Austrian Jockey Club the sum" of 20,000 crowns (about £800) as a guarantee for carrying out the conditions of the license^ and should a bookmaker break any of the stipulated clauses, or be convicted of swindling, or of trying to swindle, or be concerned in any wrongdoing whatever, he will forfeit the whole or part of his guarantee, according to the circumstances. The. Street Betting Bill, which (has ; for its object the suppression of beating in streets and other public places in England, passed its second reading in the House of Lord 6 in March, and some, time during the present session will receive the attention of the Lower House.: 'Some of. the supporters of the Bill, when it was read in the House of Lords, were of opinion that its provisions were not sufficiently drastic, but those whom it affects no doubt hold an opposite view. The Bill sets forth that any. person frequenting any Btreet, publio park, or garden, on behalf either of himself or any other person, for the purpose of bookmakihg or betting or wagering, or agreeing to bet or wager,, or paying or receiving or settling bets,: shall be liable to a fine of £10 for a, first offence, £20 for a second, and for) a, third or subsequent (offence, or iri-any ) case where it is proved •that the person ■< whilst c^Qmmit?fciug t the offence: had a-ny^ the age of sixteen years,, shall be liable!' ..on coiiviction. .or itidictment, to' a fine, not exceeding £50, or to imprisonment with ,or without hard[ labour for a term not exceeding six months, without the. option of a fine, or on conviction under the Summary Jurisdiction Acts to a fine^not exceeding £30 or to imprisonment with or without hard labour for a term not exceeding three months, without option of a fine. The Bill empowers constables to arrest without warrants, and the word " street " includes • any highway, publio bridge, road, lane, footway, square, court, alley, or passage, whether a thoroughfare or hot. However, in its present form, > the Bill ia unlikely to pass the Lower Houvse, and even if it should do So, it is. certain that the small English punter will still find means* to invest his shilling or half-crown without going to the racecourse. -

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https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/TS19050510.2.2.1

Bibliographic details

FAR AND NEAR., Star, Issue 8312, 10 May 1905

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2,376

FAR AND NEAR. Star, Issue 8312, 10 May 1905

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