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SPORTING NOTES.

4 A Skipper, a two-year-old by Merman, was showing ivinning form when the last mall leH England. 'l'here have been only four occasions or which a larger field has stkrted for the Melbourne Cup than this year, viz., 35 in 1885, 32 in- 1890, 35 in 1892 and 36 in 1895. The Gatwick Stakes, for three and four-year-olds, was won by Henry the First, with his full-brother William Rufus and St Amant ir the places. The following day St Amani was beaten by Sansovino in the Surrey Stakes A punter ran 2s into £500 over the firsi couple of days of the Melbourne Cup meeting, but with a series of disasters at the Williamstown meeting, and the last day at Flemington found himself richer in experience, bui without the price of a meal. The accident to Wairiki has drawn attention to the necessity of a properly-equipped veterinary hospital on the course at Fiemington. An Australian writer slates that plans have been prepared for a building of tha,t character, and h is said that its construction will take place before long. In referring to the death of Lord Cardigan "Milroy" says: — When Lord Cardigan was a yearling he was a mean little ' fello.w on Mi Clibborn's catalogue. The sale, I remember, W«fi going very" badly thai day, and Mr Mayo, luckily for himself, ..withdrew the colt from sale, and won a fortune with him in his own colours. The Sydney writer, " Martindale," is responsible for the following: — ki make and shape Emir is a, grand specimen of the thoroughbred racer, but there is a kink in his composition, and sometimes be seeks .Dutch courage in the bottle. When it is needed, Emir swallows whisky without a wink, but the dope is of doubtful benefit. IA good lar r Manifesto, who won fthe first of his two Grand National Steeplechases at Liverpool seven, years ago, and who is now in his seventeenth year, was among the thirty-tliree acceptors for the Gxand Serton Steeplechase, three miles, run at Liverpool last month.' He and the New Ze»l»nd-bred Motfaa, who won tiie Grand National this year, were at the head of the list of weights, each having been allotted 12st 71b. Oomplauits are being voiced all over Australasia- regarding- the riding of a large number of the jockeys who are put up in races; and, according to an Auckland writer, the recent meeting at Ellerslie proved no exception. Quite a. number of races were thrown away by tho inability of the nuers to give their mounts tha slightest assistance when it was required, and with about half dozen exceptions the horsemanship was of th; crudest description. Mr E. Clarke, who was recently in Dunedin, r stated (according to the ■' Witness) that his brother was not grievously disappointed over Canteen's running in the Melbourne Cup, as it was considered the horse was too backward to do himself justice. In the' light of the grey'a running prior to the meeting, hia form was disappointing; albeit, judging from photographs taken of the horse at that time, ha looked considerably bigger than he did when racing at his best in this island. It. Lewis, who rode Canteen in the Melbourne Cup, is reported to have had £200 on the grey in that race. Concerning Canteen's display a Melbourne writer says : — " If Canteen were put up to auction to-day he would not fetch much more than a tenth of what Sir Rupert Clarke gave for him, and Scobie's effort to improve him by slipping plenty of work into him did him harm instead of good. New Zealandore were right in declaring him many removes from a good one, and he now looks & real bad bargain." In commencing on, the Cup Carnival just concluded, the "Age" says: "It cannot be said that the jockeyship, either on the flat or over jumps, was such as could be desired. There was unpardonable clumsiness on the part of some of the seven riders in the Derby which might well have been the subject of official investigation. The race was run on i;hb opening day of the meeting, and the stewards might have taken advantage of the early opportunity they were affo*<Ud to impress upon the boye what is required of them when they are in the saddle." Barely is the " hat-trick " performed by two jockeys in one afternoon, but 'such was tho case at Donca'ster, England, Otto Madden riding the first three winners off the reel, and Lane the last three. The latter has now performed the feat three times during the present season, and ties with Danny Maher, who has also "done it" three times. Madden has twice been credited with the "hat-trick," but no other jockey 'has accomplished the feat more than once. Those who have succeeded once are:— W. Griggs, B. Wheatley, W. Halsey, B. Dillon, B. Lyndham and F. W. Hardy. Mr H. Oxenham, the owner of Acrasia, got a very enthusiastic reception when he stood up to respond to the toast of his health on settling day tA the Victorian* C!ub. Ho «sid he told all his friends that ho thought almost a certainty, and she should really have been favourite. He said he thought » £°°<* I name would always carry a man through the j world, and he had never in his life started a | horse that was not intended to win. He hoped the Australian Jockey Club Committee would see its way dear shortly to remit the remainder of the term of disqualification imposed on his old trainer, Mark Thompson. According to "Sydney DaiJy Telegraph," after Acrasia jell in the Doncaster Handicap last year, she was placed in the veterinary care of John Stewart and Sons, when it was found that sh> had injured a bone in her knee, and her leg was placed in-' plaster bandages lor thirty-one days. Afttor this she received monthly applications, and eventually made a good recovery. Some three months afterwarda she became violently attacked with gastroenteritis, and at one time grave doubts aa to her recovery were entertained; but shepulled through, and has amply repaid the care and attention bestowed upon her by *U concerned. When. Pretty Polly was' recently .sent to France she was shipped in, the identical van

in which Gladiateur travelled backwards and forwards to France. in 1865. when he annexed the English " Triple Crown." With Pretty Polly fnere travelled her regular attendant, the lad Mahouey, who "does" the filly; the head man, A. Sharpe, and the stable shoeing smith, C. Bishop, the whole of the arrangements and veterinary care of the famous filly being under the special charge of Mr Alex. A. Waugh, M.R.C.V.S., whose experience amongst thoroughbreds is perhaps unique. His travels with and amongst racehorses embrace practically every part of the Continent, as well as America, and under their combined caTe Pretty Polly was thoroughly well looked after. Sufficient forage and drinking water we:, taken to last Pretty Polly during her journej to and from, aa well as during her sojourn in, France, so that, except for the surroundings, everything was pretty much as if she were at Clarehaven Lodge, England.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/TS19041202.2.5

Bibliographic details

SPORTING NOTES., Star, Issue 8181, 2 December 1904

Word Count
1,187

SPORTING NOTES. Star, Issue 8181, 2 December 1904

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