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SPORTING NEWS.

TAR AND NEAR. ' (By THE POSSIBLE.) Besides the trotting events at the Plumpton Park Trotting; Club's meeting on Friday there was an additional attraction, in 1 the shape of some of the younger stock from the Yaldhurst staible, wftich will be carry- -. ing the colours of Mr G. G. Stead next season. In all seven horses were down, these being the two-yean-old Nightfall, by Multiifomn—La 'Notte, and the following yearlings : — Cunieform, by Mtaltifonn—Bluefire ; Noctuifomij by Multiform — La Notte ; \ Sungod, by Multiform— -Otterden ;" Munjeet, by Stepniak — Madder; Eden, by Stepniak — Far Away; and the colt by Seaton Delaval — Stepfeldt. In an interval "between the races th«v were sprinted down the straight. At this early stage it would be difficult to sort out the likely champions, but Sungod and Nootuiform were probably the popular picks on the style they Showed in their sprint. All ■''he youngsters are well-grown, and they look quite as promising as the usual lot from Yaldhursfc. The defeat of Gouvexnant in the Epsom Derby last week mai^s the downfall of another hot favourite for tie big three-year-old race. Just before the last mail* left England one of the leading London writers expressed the opinion that M. Blanc was likely to fall between two stools in connection with tho engagements of his colts, Ajax and Gouvernant, both of wflom claimed engagements in the French and English Derbies. The writer mentioned was confident that Ajax could win the Epsom race, but ihe doubted the ability of Gouvexnant. M. Blanc, however, apparently thought the French race -would be the - apdeT to win , and so decided to reserVe Ajax for it. How Ajax got on in the French Derby is not yet known, but the defeat of Gouvernarofc at Epsom must ihave been a severe "blow to backers, as lie was supported for a lot of money during the last month or two. St Amant, the Derby winner, was bred by liis owner, Mr L. De Rothschild. Last season he started five times and won three races worth £4753, sharing -with Henry the First the position of being the. best two-year-old colt of 'the season, tlhoufrh ! both were a long way behind Pretty Polly, who unfortunately did not claim a" Derby engagement. St Amant started last season by winning the Coventry Stakes, at Asoot, beating- Lanca-shire,-Bitters, John o' Gaunt and eight others, and her - next '- defeated- Hepry the First by a. short 'head in the Prince of Wales' ' Stakes at Goodwood". Then, at Doncaster. in the Champagne Stakes, he finished a moderate tihird to Pretty Polly and Lancashire. After winning the Rous Memorial Stakes at Newanaricet fte was again badly beaten by Pretty Polly in the Middle Park Plate. Throughout the •winter. ' be was one of the favourites for the Derby, ; but 'his. backers got a facer when She -was de- .; feated by His Majesty in the Newmarket ' Biennial Stakes, the first race (he contested this season.' His failure, however,, was not so very serious after all, as he was conceding 121 bto the winner. Then came the Two : Thousand Guineas. There were fourteen starters, St Amant being favourite at 11 to 4, and after Henry the First bad niade the running, St Amant drew away and won in a canter "by four lengths from John o' Gaunt, who was two lengths in front of Henry the First. This performance established St Amant as a firm favourite if or the Derby, but in the Newr

market Stakes he had to put up with third place, Henry the First winning from John o' Gaunt According to good judges, St Amant did not fill the eye as a Derby horse, and on more than one occasion his courage has been called in question. John o' Gaunt -may fairly be regarded' as the unlucky colt of the year. He has run second in the three chief three-year-old races run so far this season, the Two Thousand Guineas, Newmarket Stakes and Derby, three events, it- is worth noting, which were won by his sire, Isinglass. John o' Gaunt was bred by Sir Tatfcon Sykes, and was purchased as &■ yearling for ' 3000 guineas. At the time of the sale he was greatly 'admired, and one of the leading authorities in England selected him at the time as the most likely colt disposed of that year to win 'the Derby. The tip was not bad. after all, seeing that the only one to beat him was home bred. As a two-year-old he raced four times. He ran second to Chelys in a Madden 1 Plate at NeWmarket, fourth in the Coventry Stakes at Ascot, won by St Annan.t,- third to Pretty Polly and Vergia in the British Dominion Two-year-old Race at Sandown Park, and he wound up the season by winning the Hurstbourne States at the Bibury Club meeting. In each of these races he was ridden by an amateur in his owner's brother, Mr. George Thursby. He also had the mount in the Two Thousand Guineas, and it is probable he' rode the colt again last week. St Denis, the third horse in the Derby, did not run as a twp-year-old ; and I have been unable to discover any mention of his having started this season either. He was being backed at long prices before the last mail left, but he probably started at highly remunerative odds. The result of the Derby would be very gratifying to English sportsmen. •' There appeared to be a feeling- that the three-year-olds were only a moderate lot, and for this reason the prospects *of the French colt Gouvernapt were held in nigher esteem than would otherwise have been the case. ; Among Australian trainers, probably, no ; one has made a greater study of the scknce of breeding than Isaac Earnshaw. Some time ago, he sent Emir's pedigree to the London " Sportsman," and, in dealing with it, "The Special Commissioner", wrote:— " We have heard so much about Musket and ■' St Simon that we are apt to forget the very essential part which Fisherman has played in practically all the Musket successes. Carbine himself, it is- true, has no Fisherman blood, but Wallace, who, up to the present, is undoubtedly his best son, gets two close crosses of Fisherman through, his dam, who, like Trenton's and Abarcorn's damsj is by Goldsborough. Emir's pedigree is the more interesting, as it shows that the stout colonial blood is still asserting itself, and I sincerely trust that our Australasian friends will never, under the influence of a craze, for St Simon or any other horse, neglect the real, solid foundation of their successes. There does . nofc seem to be much fear of this, for, after referring to the fact that Wallace (by Carbine) was the most successful sire at the V.R.C. meeting, where his stock won seven races, Earnshaw goes on to say — 'Graf ton (imp.)' was also very successful at the meeting. He had three two-year-old winners. His stock show plenty, of pace, but up to the present they do not train on. Take our horses oh the whole, they are not up to the class that they were a few years back, and we have not. the stout handicap horses that could run tYro miles. . . We have been dipping too much into the St Simon and Galopin blood ; no doubt greai gallopers, but a great numbc% inclined to go wrong in their ■witad. Nearly all of this blood which I have seen have their heads put on wrong. The jaw-bones go right into the neck, leaving no room for the glands in the gullet; not like the Fisherman, Yattendon and Musket lines, whose heads are set on their necks well— no sign of wind trouble.' Evidently Galopin blood is losing its popularity in Australia, but Earnshaw's reason for objecting to it will come as- a surprise to most of us, for in this country, at any rate, it has not been -specially associated with respiratory trouble. It may well be, however, that Grafton, an undoubted roarer, and Gossoon, /another, may have got stock in Australia which seem to justify the above impression. I do. not doubt that the Galopin and St Simon importations will in the long run greatly improve the colonial breed, but no line ought ever to be worked on to excess, and to the neglect of other good ones." .Following closely on tho death of Ormonde, comes news of the death of another famous English racehorse, Bendigo. He was bred in Ireland, and was by Ben Battle — Hasty Girl. He made his first appearance in public as a three-year-old in the Cesarewitch, in which he ran unplaced. A fortnight later, starting; at 50 to 1, he won . 'the Cambridgeshire 'by a neck. Hi* only other performance that season was in the Liverpool Autumn Cup, in which he was unplaced^ As a four-year-old he ran three tiinfcs without success, his best effort being to run second in the Cambridgeshire to Florence. At five years, he '/-. started by winning the Lincolnshire Handicap, and. after winning the Hardwicte Stakes at Ascot, he again finished second, under 9st 81b, in the Cambridgeshire, this time to .the French mare Plaisanterie. His J only appearance as a six-year-old wa* in the First Eclipse Stakes at Sandown Park; in which he carried 9st 71b and won by thVee lengths. At seven years he opened out by winning i the Kem|>tari Park Jpbilee Stakes under 9st : 71b, and' then ran a dead heat with Aintree ' for third place in the Jubilee. Oup at Ascot, i Mint.unT, ana Si Miriii fioishias. i» iroat aL '■

the pair. Later on, at the same meeting, Ormonde and Minting beat him in- the Hardwicke Stakes. In the Cesarewitch he carried 9st 71b into second place, being beaten by Humewood, and two davs> later he defeated St Mirin and Eirdspord in the Champion Stakes. Then, for the third time, when weighted at 9st 131 b, he ran second for the Cambridgeshire, the winner turning up in Gloriation. At the stud Bendigo was not a success. He left a number of winners, but nothing of any class. One of his sons, Voyon, was, imported by Mr F. Foy, of New South Wales. Before being retired to the stud Vcpu raced for a season or two, one of his -best; 'performances being when he ran second to Merriwee for the Mcl bourne Cup in 1899. Had Pretty Polly's name being missing from the Oaks nominations, as well as from the list of those engaged in the Derby, the fillies' race would have been invested 1 , with a lot of interest. The presence of Major Loder's flying filly, however, would probably frighten out all but a few, as, on form, nothing had a chance with her. Pretty Polly, who was bred by her owner, has an unbeaten certificate up to the present, and many good judges regard her as likely to prove thef best mare that has ever raced in England. As a two-year-eld she won her nine engagements. She- opened her account by winning the British Dominion two-year-old race ai Sandown 'Park, John o 1 Gaunt being third, and on the same course she won the National Breeders' Produce Stakes, following it up with a victory in the Mersey Stakes at Liverpool. Then came the Champagne Stakes at Doncaster, when Lancashire and St Amant followed her home. An easy triumph in the Autumn Breeders' Foal Plate at Manchester was followed by a victory in the Chiveley Park Stakes at Newmarket, after which she won the Middlepark Plate, St Amant being a poor second. Then followed a double win at Newmarket, in the Criterion Stakes and Moulton Stakes. Altogether, Pretty Polly's nine victories as a two-year-old were worth 513.000. (This season she started with odds of 4 to 1 laid on her in the One Thousand Guineas, and easily defeated her five opponents. At the end of last season, Pretty Polly was regarded as a long way in front of the best colts of the year. Unfortunately she was .not nominated for the Derby, but she is engaged in the St Leger. Among her other engagements this season are several which look like certainties for her. Her meeting with the colts in the Sst Leger.' will "be watched with interest ;, but fiie t^St test of her ability will be provided if she contests the Champion Stakes, at Newmarket, in October, as in that event Sceptre and Rock Sand are engaged, as well as St Amant. Bitters, who ran second in the Oaks, started seven times last season, her only winning bracket being in the Stamford Two-year-old Plate, at Chester, but in most of her engagements she was me.eting the cracks of the year. .Fiancee won* 'her three races as a two-year-old, but in none of them was the opposition strong. This season she was unplaced in the One Thousand Guineas. Twenty-three fillies have carried off the double, One Thousand Guineas and Oaks, -and of this number five (Formosan, Hannah, Apology, La Fleche and Sceptre) also won the St Leger. It is not hard to imagine that thl race for the Coronation Cup, at the Epsom meeting, excited unusual interest. English turf writers, when discussing the prospects for. *he present season, were unanimous in the view that the fiva-year-old Sceptre arid the four-yeax-olds Linfandel and Bock Sand weie in a class by. themselves, so far as the older horses were concerned, and the chance of seeing the three opposed to each other would be quite sufficient to ensure the success of a meeting. Zinfandel Avas- bred by the late -Colonel M'Calmont, but the death of that sportsman voided all his nominations. Some time later the whole string, consisting of about fifty horses, was purchased frcm the executors by Lord Howard de Walden. Having no classic engagements as a three-year-old Zinfandel did not meet the cracks of his own age, but his record for the season made it pretty clear that he was the best three-year-old that raced in England last season," as out of six starts he won five times and was second once. After beating a good handicap, field in the "Manchester- Cup, one. mile and a half, he won toe. Gold vase, at Ascot, run over two miles* the Gordon Stakes, one mile and a half, at Goodwood 1 , and the Brighton Cup, one mile and a quarter. He then ran second in the two mile and a quaxter Cesarewitch Stakes to Grey Tick, to whom he was conceding four years and nearly two stone in weight, and he wound up the season 'by winning the Scarborough btakes, one mile and a half, at Newmarket. A noticeable feature about his performances is that they were all accomplished in long distance events, and he was (hailed' at the end of last season as a horse quite up to the best traditions over a. stayer's course. . Sceptre, the sensational heroine of 1902, when she won four out of the five great three-year-old races, running in the colours of the now notorious Mr E. S. Sievier, was again a good performer last seaeon, having in the meantime passed into the hands of Mi> W. Bass. This is not the first time she has taken part in a race in which the- cracks of different ages were, engaged. Last season, iii the Sandown Park Eclipse Stakes, she ran second to Ard Patrick (who had defeated her in the Derby in 1902) , while the third place was filled by Rock Sand. This race gave rise to great enthus&san, which would probafily-he nearly equalled by last week's contest "for the, Coronatkra Cup. Rock as t/he winner, of the Two Thousand Guineas,, Derby and St Leger, would under ordinary circumstances have been regarded as the bestof "his year, but he was probably v,ery lucky in missing the opposition of Zinfandel. Viewed through Ms perfo-rau-arices against Sceptre 'he was not a champion, as the mare 'beat 'him "badly, both times they met last season. Sceptre, Zinfandel and Rock Sand are expected to meet, more than once before the close of thds season. All three are enga-ged in th-e Ascot Gold <3up, of two miles and a half, the premier long distance race of England, and which will be decided next week. On form, none of the English horses can have a chance with, them, but added interest may be given to the race by the presence of. French opposition. French horses have

played a prominent part in tftus race, and this year they can foe represented l by la*t year's winner. Maximum 11., and several other proved stayers. Another case of "ringing-in" has been unearthed in Australia, and salutary punishment has been meted out. After the Totalisator Handicap was run afc Adelaide on. May 14, rumours were current that the winner. Macleay, was not the horse he was represented to be>. The owner of the second horse, Chatter, did not hear anything until the dividend had' been paid over, but in due course he entered a protest with the South Australian Jockey Club, and an inquiry was commenced. The ground of the protest was that the horse was not Macleay, by Good- j fellow — Orphan Girl, as stated in the nomination. When Macleay won his first race in Adelaide, he was described as a bay, whereas the horse of that name known in Sydney was a brown. Another point about the Macleay racing .in Adelaide was that he was very smart off the mark, and some time back Sydney pony men made no secret of their 'belief that he was identified with a brilliant galloway, who was sold, and whose name has not cropped up anywhere since. He was believed to have left Australia, but. recent developments suggest that he never got beyond South Australia. The inquiry ! by the South Australian Jockey Club began on May 17, and waa adjourned for a week | to enable the production of further evidence, and the owner of the horse was called on to produce him in order that his exact height might be ascertained, all other particulars having been procured. The owner | told the stewards at the previous hearing that he had sold the horse, and he was doubtful if the new owner would produce him. He subsequently informed the secretary of the club that the horse would be produced, 'but when the steward's met at the appointed time neither man nor horse was present. After taking evidence, the stewards decided that the horse which ran as Macleay was not Macleay, by Goodfelow — Orphan Girl, and upheld the protest, awarding the ptakes to the second horse, Chatter. They also decided ,.that Mr Slattery, the owner, and the bay gelding which ran as Macleay in the Totalizator Handicap should i be disqualified for life for corrupt practices. I Indian sportsmen are not enamoured of ! the -ways of the Australian jockeys that J have been seen in India. A recent issue of the "Indian Planters' Gazette" contains the following paragraph: — "It is stated J that, after the 'Bombay, meeting a jockey who hailed 1 from Australia left for his native land with a nice little nest-egg of bei tween £700 and £800 of the best, and that the last contribution to this little parcel was a cheque for Rs. 2000, drawn by a generous, firm of turf operators in fayour of the active young horseman, as some slight token of their appreciation of his ' little efforts.' It is further stated that the W.I.T.C. haveNintimated to this jockey that he will foe^vafiting his time if 'he makes j any further application for a license. So I it is said that he has now gone far away to the pretty town of Sydney, where the pony meeting flourishes and the ramper ramps, and the stumer stumes in sweet abandon ! Let us hope that he and all others like him will stay there, as India is not a hot en oi.gh place for them." The Sydney writer " Pilot " takes strong exception to Sydney being described as a place where the "ramper ramps and the stumer stumes in sweet abandon." He states that not even at one of the pony meetings would the stewards stand what, according to the exchanges, has been quietly passed over at big meetings in India during the past few montha. "Vyhile the :tJiirf may , not be exactly pure in Australia, it is claimed for it that it is at least as clean as it is in India.

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SPORTING NEWS., Star, Issue 8031, 8 June 1904

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3,409

SPORTING NEWS. Star, Issue 8031, 8 June 1904

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