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SPORTING NOTES.

[By Castor in " Canterbury Times."] Although at various times during the Jast eighteen months horses have been drafted but of the Yaldhurst stable, others have been purchased, arid Mason has now about eighteen under his care. Of these no less than eight are yearlings, and will therefore be two-year-olds next wee'f, four are two-year-olds, four are three-year-olds, one is four years of age, and one, Bluefire, is a young mare just about to be sent to the stud: As a rule it is not difficult to select among the yearlings at Yaldhurst two or three that are likely to develop into really good horses. But when I looked over the establishment last week I failed to discover one which in thia. stage of its career, gives more than ordinary promise. But yearlings are, after all, very deceptive creatures, and it may be that among the eight there are two or three who . may assist in making turf history. Perhaps the most forward of them is .Conqueror, by Medallion from Siesta. This young gentleman seems rather hardier than the majority of his dam's progeny, and he is decidedly a nice colt on top. However, the appearance of his forelegs is not altogether reassuring, and I am not satisfied that his career on the turf will be lengthy. He has commenced to grow up on the leg a little lately, and just now he is not altogether unlike Senior Wrangler. Altair is not at all like his full-brother Day Star. He is a neat, compact little colt, and looks as if he would come early. His very loaded shoulders are as apparent as ever, and probably many capable judges would not hesitate to express the opinion that they are, bound , to prevent him from galloping fast. -.\t Whether this will be the case We shall, doubtless, know ■ in a few months. In every -other respect the son of Castor and Cissy., is a wellbalanced, active, colt, and his legs are clean arid nicely shaped. Kissmiss, by Hotchkiss — Bridal Rose, has coinmeuued to grow into shape, and although he still bears a peculiar appearance, due to his fore-end being some inches lower than his quarters, he does not look quite so grotesque as he seemed a month or two ago. His hocks are bent almost to deformity, but he possesses size and power and wonderful bone, and as a three-year-old, perhaps later still, he may be something more than a useful horse.. Legerity is the very antithesis of his elder brother, St Cyr. He is short, small, and. inclined to be cobbified. He is very neat, however, and if his doubtful forelegs stand he will gallop fast, even if he does not stay. Signet is very like his three-quarter brother Mauser; /but'he is an improvement altogether on what his relative was at a similar age. He looks harder, his joints are de*cidedly better, aud he is by no means so light in the middle piece. His legs appear cleau, but then he has done le3s work than some of his companions. His head is much more attractive than Mauser's, and altogether he is a most promising colt. Corselet damaged her off forefoot very badly shortly after she arrived from Auckland. A large portion of the hoof Was literally torn away. It is growing down very nicely, however, arid as the filly is very over-grown it will b% given ample time to . recover its former dimensions. The daughter of Cuirassier is, although a trifle pinched over the quarters, ; an Exceedingly nice filly on top. She is, however, very much on the leg, and her fore- ' legs are stilty. Perhaps as a three-year-old she will race well, but even supposing she ' were tried next season, which is extremely doubtful, she could hardly be got ready to ; do herself justice. Hippocrene, a stout < chubby little son of St Hippo and -Wai- ] temata, is backward. I should not be 1 surprised, howeverj if he were to commence ■ to grow later on and develop into a fair- i sized horse. Motto, ri lengthy, low-set < filly by Medallion &6m M&rion, may come i early and gallop fast/ It is, I believe, no ] secret that her f.ull*brother, Grand Cross, ■ until he acquired a knack of striking him- : self, Bho Wed great,- promise; indeed, he i was regarded as- likely to prove one of the ' best of his yea*. i The two-y&af-olds, or, perhap3,l should say ther- rising' three-year-olds, are Gold Medallist, Multiform, St Cyr and Beauty : Sleep, .The first-named has neither grown *rior furnished perceptibly, but then he realty required to do neither. He was quite : : thick erioigh, powerful enough and big enough last summer, and any further development would have meant a heavier burden for his legs to carry. He appears, however, to have Decome harder and more seasoned, and he is now a typical stout thoroughbred horse in every, sense of '■ the expression. His legs show no traces of the trouble which affected him in the autumn, and he is to all appearances so for-, ward that after a few weeks' strong work he would be quite fit to race. Multiform has;grown up a little on the leg perhaps, and) to the hypercritical, he is a trifle short ; but he possesses great power in the right places, and his legs look as clean as they were this time last year. Whether he will^stay is a question which time alone can :answer. Personally I think. he will, and he is, I feel confident, good enough to win nine Derbies out ■of ten. Unfor- " tunatelyfor him, next season's race looks like proving to be the tenth. I must confess to toeing disappointed vri.tb. St Cyr. The son of St Leger has grewn up on the leg, and he has not furnished materially. Perhaps he. has not done well. However, -whatever . be the reason, he hardly fills the eye as a colt likely to stay two miles as a three-year-old. Later on he may be able to get a distance, but probably lie will always shine to most advantage over short distances. Perhaps when he is five or six years of age he will be an invincible miler. Beauty Sleep was running out in a paddock in company with Bluefire and Firefly. The daughter of Medallion will, I understand, resume regular work this week. I am afraid, however, that she is a weakconstitutioned animal," and I am quite sure that Firefly is. As Mason explains, the little daughter of Artillery was so well as a two-year-old that to improve her was •impossible, and the chances are that she will never really recover her form. Uniform, who injured one of his feet during the race for the Derby, is apparently sound again. He has thickened a good deal during his retirement, and he is now an exceedingly powerful colt. Like Multiform, he is honest and game to a degree, and although, perhaps, not quite first-class, he is a horse that will always take a great deal of beating in races run over a mile, and a mile and a half. Epaulet has not grown up, but he has thickened considerably. He is still as sluggish as ever. I understand that he will not take part in the Ladies' Bracelet, to be decided at the Canterbury Jockey Club's Grand National Meeting, but as it is very probable that the best of him has not yet been seen, he may win an important race next season. At any rate, of the prospects of the two Taldhurst horses engaged in the New Zealand Cup, I infinitely prefer his. Curassow will be put into work again shortly. I understand that the son of Albatross did not actually break down, but his soft, gummy joints were giving trouble, and it was considered advisable to allow them time to become callous. Mannlicher is looking wonderfully well. The indentation in his quarter has now practically disappeared, and he is apparently sound all over. He is, I feel convinced, a really good horse up to a certain distance, and, with ordinary luck, he ■will, unless I am much mistaken, prove this during the present season. It is just possible that he may start in the welter races to be decided at the Grand National Meeting. If *c does be ought to be sufficiently forward to do himself justice. His full sister Bluefire, is, as I have alveak;? stated, running out in one of the paddocks. Tao daughter of Maxim is. Naturally very much in the rough, but she is well and hearty. In a iuon.il. or two she will be sent up to Auckland on a visit to St Leger, while Corolla, Ich Dien, and Marion will go to Elderslie to be mated with Gipsy Grand. By the way, I am sorry to hear that Corolla's foal, a full-sister to Gold Medallist, died last week from the effects of a chill. Mason states that she was a lovely filly. The progeny of Corolla have been extraordinarily unfortunate, and this reminds me that her

yearling, a filly by Medallion, named Corona has proved untrainable. The mare herself, too, is not in foal this season. Marion, however, has held to Dreadnought and Ich Dien is in foal to St Leger. Both, however, have lost their foals of last season, so that Mr Stead has no rising yearlings. Mason, too, has been in a bad way. About a fort--1 night ago he met with an accident by which a wrist was strained and a couple of ribs fractured. Unfortunately, the latter portion of the. injury was not discovered until ten days after the accident, but now the sufferer is receiving proper treatment he is recovering rapidly. _ With reference to the remarks concerning the breeding of Gipsy, particulars of which were published in these columns last week, the.compiler of the Australian Stud Book has written to the Sydney Mail, as follows:— "As Mr Morton says, she was a 1 black mare bred in 1840, and taken to New Zealand by Mr John Beit early in 1845. He jas said to have bought her at the clearance sale of Mr C.-Siqith's stud in 1844. During heY racing career V New Zealand, which was a successful one, she was always described as by Rous'a Emigrant, so it may be taken for granted that horse was her sire. Respecting the breeding of her dam I have never been able to find out anything definite, though it is possible, asMr Morton says, that the mare was by Bay Camerton out of a mare imported by the Government of New South Wales in 1827, and foaled about 1825. It is improbable, however, that this imported mare was by Muley Moloch, for the well-known English sire of I that name was foaled in 1830. Even so, there is little doubt that Gipsy must have come from a good running family ; her descendants have shown such high-class racing form in each succeeding generation there can have been no stain in her pedigree. Besides, for some years before 1840 Mr C. Smith had several mares of pure lineage in his stud. Were a- catalogue of the sale in 1844 forthcoming, no. doubt Gipsy's pedigree would be found in it." Mr Fendall has asked me to make an explanation concerning the part he played in the Ladies' Purse referred to by " The Druid" in an article on Racing on the Early Days of Canterbury, published on Juno 17, "The Druid" wrote as follows: — " Cruiskeen won by a fluke ; Tamerlane ran in the race, and it being generally known that he could run clean away from either Cruiskeen or Lady Gladstone, it was arranged between Mr Fendall and Mr Lee, who rode Tamerlane, that Cruiskeen should lead till entering the straight, Tamerlane to be held back till then. Mr Fendall went on all the way at a good pace, Mr Lee holding Tamerlane about three hundred yards behind —he dared not go nearer, as he could not hold his horse. As soon as Cruiskeen entered the straight Mr Fendall, instead of pulling him in to let Tamerlane come up, let him out, and the distance was too short for Tarn to overtake him, consequently he won. Mr. Lee was terribly cut up about the affair, as it was hinted that he had sold the race, while Mr Turner was so taken by surprise that he generously gave the £40 toward? building a atand for the comfort of the ladies." Mr Fendall explains that Cruiskeen bolted off the course, and when he got him back he found that Tamerlane was fully half a mile behind. It was absolutely impossible, therefore, to prevent Cruiskeen from winning unless he actuall: pulled him, and this naturally he declined to do. A letter explaining the matter wns subsequently sent to the Jockey Club, and the explanation was considered quite satisfactory. By his victory in the Eclipse Stakes on Friday, Persimmon has added an appreciable sum to the amount of money won by him in stakes. He has shown, too; that the English three-year-olds this season are. with the exception of Galtee More, very moderate indeed. Velasquez has undoubtedly proved himself to be as far in front of the remaining three-year-olds as he is behind Galtee More, and yet at weight-for-age, a scale which is acknowledged to be all in favour of three-year-olds, he was unable to *beat Persimmon, The Prince of Wales's horse has now won six races, including , the Derby, the St Leger, the Ascot Cup and the Jockey Club Stakes, while he has finished second once and third once. The for the Eclipse Stakes included Knight of the Thistle, Vesuvian, Berzak, Chelandry and Labrador. Galtee More, unfortunately, was not entered, and for •the present there. seems no prospect of the Irish-bred colt meeting Persimmon. Another item of intelligence furnished by cable is that the Australian-bred mare Acmena has won a Welter Handicap at Newmarket. The victory comes ■ just in time to redeem the character of colonial . horses at Home. Acmena has- run many times without winning, Paris appears to have broken down and Maluma, Merman and Bombshell have not yet reproduced their colonial form on English courses. I confess I cannot find any serious errors in Mr Henry's handicaps for the Grand National Steeplechase and Hurdle Race. St Simon, -who has been scratched for both events, might have had a few pounds more in the Steeplechase and a pound or two less in the Hurdle Race, and I cannot quite see on what grounds Booties has been handicapped at lOst 31b in the Steeplechase. Chaos invariably runs better' in public than in private, and a horse o£ his temperament is not likely to be bustled as much as some of the others who will be making their first appearance over hurdles. Annabelle, Hippomenes, Prairie Grass, St Anthony, Flirt and Levanter are all unlikely to start, and Muscatel, -who. has arrived at Riccarton> appears to be suffering from the effects of her exertions at the Wellington Racing Club's Winter Meeting. Her Btable companion Dummy, however, looks really well It is stated that the Grand National Steeplechase will be his special mission. Levanter may not come south. If he does come he is pretty certain to run well in the Steeplechase. However, he is not likely to beat Mutiny, who is, I. understand, really welL Others I like in the cross-country event are Kingswood, who, it maybe remembered, I selected many months ago, as a horse likely to run well in a Grand National Steeplechase, Gillie, Morag and Highlander. In the Hurdle Race I have a preference for Golden Plover, Chaos, Muscatel and Misfire, and to reduce my selections to the narrowest limit I shall take Mutiny to win the Steeplechase and Golden Plover to appropriate the Hurdle Race. From American papers which arrived by the San Francisco mail, I gather that on the first day of the Royal Ascot Meeting the French colt Masque 11. carried 7st 91b to victory in the Ascot Stakes. Merman, who was handicapped at 7st 41b, accepted, but as Earwig, 7st 101 b, by HamptonWriggle was second, and the Manchester Cup winner, Piety Bst 71b by SatietyDevote, was third, the Australian horse, if he started, must have finished unplaced. Masque 11. started favourite. The Fortieth Ascot Biennial Stakes, for two-year-olds, was won by the American-bred colt Elfin, by Sensation — Equality, with Zanoni, by Royal Hampton — Rosy Cross, who started favourite, second, and Laf ere by St Simon,— Musketry third. Count Schombergwasmade an cv&- m ? nn y for the Gold Vase, and the Irish-bred horse won from Comfrey and Doiemi, while Galtee More fresh from his victory in the Derby, appropriated the Prince of Wales's Stakes for three-year-olds. It will be noticed that not one of the four races mentioned was won by a horse bred in England. From a similar source, 1 learn that Roxelaine started favourite for the Grand Prix de Paris, with Palmiste, the winner of the French Derby, second in demand. The latter finished unplaced, and Doge, |who was at 12 to 1, won by half a length from Roxelaine, with Parasol 11. a neck away fourth. No English horses started, but America was represented by St Cloud 11., who had previously finished unplaced in the Derby.

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SPORTING NOTES., Star, Issue 5932, 26 July 1897

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SPORTING NOTES. Star, Issue 5932, 26 July 1897

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