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SPORTING NOTES.

f" Canterbury Times."!

The visiting horses to the Canterbury Jockey Club's. Spring Meeting have commenced to arrive at Eiccarton, and on Saturday night G. Wright's team, which consists of Day Star, Acone, Armilla and Woodstock, put in an appeararice. Naturally there was a good deal of curiosity as to the appearance of Day Star. The son of Castor, who has distinctly thrown back to Musket, is a big powerful colt, and is so lazy that he has to be ridden in his work with the whip. In his slow paces, and especially while trotting, he displays unmistakable signs of being lame behind. Wright, however, states that he is always like this, and he considers that it will in no way interfere with his prospects. Armilla is a handsome filly, built on much lighter lines than Day Star, while ; Acone is a fine-looking horse, in good condition, and Woodstcc :, a three-year-old . son of St Leger an J Cantinere, is a.stout, big colt, who appears to be rather backward. Mahaki, who came south by. the steamer which brought Wright's horses, remained in town until Tuesday morning, when lie made his ap? pcarance' at "Eiccarton and -did easy work in clothing/ .Projh the little that could bo seen of : him he appears to be in fairly good condition.

At the Newmarket Second October Meeting, held last week* : the Cesarewitch was won by Saint Bri's, a three-year-old colt by St Simon — Nandine, belonging to Mr W. Low, and trained at Kingsolere by J. Porter. Saint Bris, who did not race as, a two-year-old, carried (>st 61b;.. and he whs followed home by another three-year-old in the shape of Chit Chat 6st 41b, a gelding by May Boy from Small Talk, the property of Mr A. F. Calvert. Tho six-year-old mare Laodamia, by Kendal — Chrysalis, who carried Bst 81b was third. Mr Fulton's mare has been a most exasperating animal to critics and backers alike, . as time after time she has been supported for great handicaps, either to be scratched just before the race or to run . pounds below her true form. . However, on this occasion backers have had a run for their money, and the clever connections of the mare have apparently caught a tartar. On Saturday the Middlepark Plate was decided and resulted in the defeat of . Lord-Rose-bery's champion two-year-old Velasquez by Galtee More, a son of Kendal, and Morganette. Kendal, I may remark, is by Bend Or, and was bred by the Duke of Westminster in the same year as Ormonde. Before the pair ran as two-year-olds Kendal defeated the mighty son of Lily Agnes in a trial, and although he broke down before he was three years old he was on the strength of this performance sold subsequently as a stallion for 18,000gs, an outlay which the victory of Galtee More will materially assist the owner of Kendal to recoup himself.r ' Evidently Wallace has. after all proved 'uhtrainabie,.as'the cable informs us- that he. has been scratched .for all his engagements in the spring. I hope, however, that he' has been. -scratched not because he, lias actually broken down, but because it is feared that he might if he were persevered with. Mr W. R. Wilson has not had verymuch luck this season. Trentham and Nada both ran badly at the Australian Jockey Club's Spring Meeting. Cydnus, judging from his display in the Caulfield Guineas has not fulfilled the promise he gave last- season, while Resolute's feet were, when the last mail left, occasioning some anxiety. They are light and shelly, and were showing signs of their contact with the hard ground. However, as the son of Trenton was well supported up to the last minute for the Caulfield Cup, he evidently survived the ordeal of his preparation, and although he was not placed, he ran prominently right up to the distance. By tho way, Mr Wilson started no less than three horses in the Caulfield Cvp — -Resolute, Nada and Merman — and here again his ill fortune was apparent, as Merman was left at the post.. However, the Victoria Racing Club's Spring Meeting is still before us, and such a powerful team as that trained at St Albans will be strangely unfortunate if it fails to win some valuable races.

The result o£ the Caulfield Cup was a great surprise. As was the case inthis event last year Hopscotch was made a strong favourite, and he again tried to cut down his opponents. However, although' he led until the top turn was reached he then gave way to the second favourite, Eesolute, who, in turn, led to the distance. Here, however, Mr Wilson's colt was in difficulties, and Straightfire, passing him, appeared to have the race won until Cremorne caught him in the last stride and won by a head. Cremorne, who, on account of* an inferior display in the Toorak Handicap on the previous Saturday, started at the outside odds of 33 to 1, is a son of Glorious and Nea, a mare by Lord of Lynne, and was a few years ago regarded as. one of the best handicap horses in Australia. This was in 1893, when he was a four-year-old. Among the half-dozen races which he won that season were the A.J.C. Doncaster Handicap, in which he carried Bst 2lb, the A.J.C. All-aged Stakes, in which he defeated Paris and Light Artillery, and the A.J.C. Final Handicap, in which he carried 9st 81b and won easily by three lengths. All these races were run at the- Australian Jockey Club's Autumn Meeting in April, and in the following month he fairly eclipsed these performance . by carrying 9st 91b, and winning the Queen's Birthday Cup, run at the Sydney Turf Club's Birthday Meeting,' by three lengths, from a large field which included Paris 9st 4lb, Impulse Bst 81b, and Florrie Bst 6lb. For the next A.J.C. Metropolitan Stakes, he was handicapped at 10s t, while Paris, the ultimate winner, received only 9st 2lb. In the Melbourne Cup he was weighted at 9st 71b, the only two horses above him being Strathmore, 9st 101 b and The Admiral 9st 91b, while he was top weight in the Caulfield Cup with 9st 131 b. However, before these events were decided he lost all form, and alter finishing third to Loyalty and Stepniak in the Craven Plate run at the Australian Jockey Club's Spring Meeting and unplaced in the Australian Jockey Club's Spring Stakes and in the Melbourne Stakes and Melbourne Cup he retired for the remainder of the season. In the following season he started on eight occasions without once running into a place, and as he did not face the starter once last season, the handicapper naturally considered that he was simply a relic of the past, and let him into the Caulfield Cup with Bst 91b. Certainly it is a wonderful instance of resurrection, and J. Alsopp, who trains the horse,has goodcause to be satisfied with the results of his patience and industry. Straightfire, who has long been expected to win a good race, only just missed the accomplishment by a neck, while Le Var, by finishing third, accomplished a capital performance for a three-year-old, and Merman, who, we are told, was left at the post, must have done wonders to get through such a large number of horses and finish fourth. His stable companion, Eesolute, was fifth, -while the Eiccarton-bred Alpine appears to have run prominently for a mile and a quarter. Armiila's brother Cravat, on the other hand, was conspicuous by a position which he occupied as one of the last three horses to pass the winning post. There appears to have been that amount of interference which is naturally inseparable from a race run round sharp turns and contested by a large field ; but some of it was perhaps not altogether- unintentional, and Holmes, the rider of The Parisienne, complained against the lad on Le Var, but the stewards, dismissed the complaint. _ Straightfire and Le Var are mt engaged in the Melbourne Cup, so

their performances have not affected thebetting on the Victor a Kaciug Cluo's great event. The principal feature of the other racing a. Cauifieid ou Saturday was the success of Mr S. Miller's horses m the jumping events. The second H,u.rdio liace was won by Kealgar, a sou of pie recently defunct JUalua ; wniie Laniook_ud V\'hernside, both tne property of ;Mr Miner, finished first ami sec >nd respectively iv the Second Steeplechase. _n« Nursery Handicap fell to Hyuiettut, a son ol tiie imported Eiridspord, iroui uusy B«:e, while Key, a son of another ii_por._u, horse, Padlock, xVolu (joverucss, who is probably the dam of Jane j^yre, was second, and The Enchanter's i u7i oiother, ihc Hypnotist, by Trenton, iroiu _he Charmer, wa3 third. Two nit.-eito ili&uppoiuuug animals, Cohort, by Caioine from the Hying Mshwiie, and, ot Daviu, uy _arlyuii from Queen of iNat.ous, uuisheu u^sl ana second respectively in t„e idaiueu Plate, aud ;in t_e vv .nd or Handicap, Lieutenant, by the Uiqjoried horse _ Seiiuciiaiup, easily deleateutiiu cii.uup on _»ony Cmdeieilen, by l'reutou from _h. isew Zealaiidbred Cinderella aud u._e.etn Oilier iioises. By the way, in the Su.eji.eo_a_e, vtraterloo led and, Dmuiug his ue<*r mud feDiooK, had to be destroyed. T„i_ loss, foliowiug so soon after tuat of Duu^au, snouid cause toe Messrs Maun old, niiu owued both i.oi'se-, to ue beiioveisiiithe oid ad„^e that

'" inisromuies never oo_ie sm^ii."

E. Dent, who took Juiy to America when the. sou of> 'I'raduour was sent across to Mr J. ii. Hag ti i_, relumed to New /jealand recently, and Uas settled down in jjuneuin. lvs v ' wuoJi li.c was interviewed by " Ma-eppa," . 01- ihe Utago witness, who' encited some very luterestiug facts, ll appears that wmie employed at the lutucho.del Paso i>ent was at various times attached to the ataiuons ; Sir Modred,' Sal viator, and. Teuny. He states that the. m_t-nauied has fallen in a -httle between' the eyes. and"-behirid the wither^otherwise, he carries his age well, and he is regarded as the principal stallion on the Eanch. Salvator, who was one of the greatest racehorses ever bred in America, and his for-. _.._'' great rival, Tenny;-have not so fatbeen successes at the stud, but Ormonde's son Goldfinch, who previous to leaving England sired Chelandry, is thought highly of, arid so is St Andrew, a son oi St Simon. Da.ebin, how'everj-is badly neglected, and Dent thinks that his progeny have failed to make great names for themselves because they have been mismanaged. They are all great over-grown youngsters, but nevertheless they are broken in and tried as early, as the more precocious yearlings, and the consequence is they do not receive a chance to mature. As a proof of his stateriie'at Dent saw yearnings' which had been soldthiee weeks previously at the Eancho del Paso sale being asked to gallop a couple of furlongs against time. July pleased the Americans, and the first of his foals, which were born a week or two before Dent left showed promise.

I daresay that not a few backers and layers alike have good cause to remember Mata's Dunedin Cup, and the subsequent defeat of Mata and Trump Card by Guy Fawkes in the Canterbury Cup. In the course of an interview with a representative of the Melbourne Sportsman, Mr M. Cohen, at one time a bookmaker in New Zealand, and now a person of some importance in the » Melbourne ring, casually mentions these incidents. As a result of Mata's Dunedin Cup victory, Mr Cohen was cerbainiy. the heaviest ' winner in the South. Island, iJ-iOOO being the amount he netted over the success of the sou of Dead Shot. He, thanks to . Fishhoo ;, .won -2230 Q. when tho son of : Traducer appropriated his . Duuedin Cup, and cleared -31000 as a- result of the success of Natator in the Wellington Cup. When ; Pungawerewere, the dam of Tranter, won me Dunedin Cup, Mr Cohen followed up his previous successes in connexion with this race by winning -.1800 after laying the -table _._OJJ. Tneu —at Uim_t_iau _u,tius time — he took it into his head to field heavily against thf first f:i.'-o'iv : tes for the Canterbury Cvp — Mata and Trump Card — and as a rank outsider in Guy Fawkes Came to his rescue he scoope I thu pool and captured! close upon .-300 J of backers' money. '■'. . ' '.' ■

" I'erlinga," the sporting editor of the _t«siraJasia?t, inspected Mr S. l>. Couk's hor3es recently, an I the ifesue of the paper which appeared ori the moi ningof the day on which tlie Caulfield <3-uin«ns was decided contained the following written by him : — The apple of Mr Cook's uy« at. present is The Officer, by Robinson Crusoe from Marie Louise. In an ordinary year I fancy his owner would be very sanguine about this colt taking the highest honours, and even with Newhaven in the way he has some hopes of winning the Derby for the third time. The Officer is a rich brown, standing fully sixteen hands, and ho. has let down and improved very much since last season. When I saw him in his box last week he gave me the .idea of a colt that, had done a good preparation, and. l should say that with his race to-day, and a few winding-up gallops afterwards he will be very tit when lie meets Newhaven in the Derby. The Officer is a grandson of Josephine, and the family has so far been more famed for fillies than colts, but I fancy this colt is an improvement on any previous descendant of The Palmer mare. His form last spring was very good, and I doubt if he was wound up when he ran in the autumn. He took to growing after the spring, and Mr Cook wisely determined to give him every chance. My only doubt about him as a Derby colt is on the score of stamina. None of the Josephines have shown a partiality for a distance, but Robinson Crusoe may have transmitted this quality to The Officer.

The complete success of the Ohoka and Eyreton Jockey Club's annual race meeting on Thursday was in a measure prevented by a- strong north-wester, which sprang up in the afternoon. However, by the time it commenced everybody who had intended to be present was on the course, and consequently the attendance was well up to the average, while speculation was fairly, brisk. Zola, who started favourite for the Hunters' Flat Race, broke a bloodvessel during the race, and Breeze, a nicelooking mare by Burlington, won comfortably from Take-Down and St Wolfstan. Saracen,, who was looking, particuticularly well, was not , really extended during any portion of the Ohoka and Eyreton Handicap, and therefore all the race told us regarding his prospects for the New Zealand Cup was that he is in the best of health. Jewel has never looked better in her life than she did on Thursday, and after defeating a strong favourite in Frenchy for the Mandeville Welter Handicap, she came out in the 'Flying Handicap and Avon with something to spare from Rangiatea. The last named was supported for the proverbial pounds, shillings and pence, but after running well to the turn he obviously refused to try directly Jewel challenged him. The highly-bred Black Eagle made his debxit in the Mandeville Welter Handicap. When sold at the Yaldhurst sale in April he had just come off a station where lie had been turned out. Naturally he was very poor, and although he has built up since, he can still be improved a good deal. His manners, too, are none of the best just yet, and Clark appeared to be able to make nothing of him. However, later on ,in the District Welter Handicap he ran much more kindly in the hands of Mr T. G-. M'Donald, and won comfortably from Sun Spec and Camel, the former of whom is a full sister to Silver Spec, and is principally remarkable for a twisted foreleg, which is almost a deformity. The Hack Selling Race went to Jib, a neat little half-sister by Alma to Mainstay. She will, I trust, be less expensive to her connections than her fraudulent relative has been.

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Bibliographic details

SPORTING NOTES., Star, Issue 5766, 27 October 1896

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2,694

SPORTING NOTES. Star, Issue 5766, 27 October 1896

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