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AUSTRALIAN AND FOREIGN SPORTING.

Since his return from Sydney Newhaven ha 3 (writes the Melbourne correspondent of the Sydney Referee) been looking very light, and he seems to have wasted over the loins. He is apparently a horse that a little hard work knocks up. Young Jimmy Wilson, who formerly had him, says he was never able to properly wind him up as a two-year-old, and Hickenbothani will apparently have his work cut out to keep him well for the Spring racing. Newhaven is by no means a robust horse, and while I regard the Derby as a good thing for him, I fancy the Melbourne Cup will be too much for him, more especially if he has a severe race in the Derby.

It turns out after all that St Frusquin did not actually break down, and when the last mail left England he was doing easy work. On the subject of his lameness and his withdrawal from the St Leger, the London Sportsman has the following : — It seems that when Hayhoe found the sinews of the foreleg flushed and sore he communicated with Lord Eothschild, and told him it would be impossible to give St Frusquin a Leger preparation. The sad news was telegraphed to Mr Leopold de Rothschild, who, when he left England for a brief visit to St Moritz, had no idea that anything was wrong with the St Leger favourite. He at once replied to Lerd Eothschild requesting him to strike the colt out of the race and thus save intending backers their money.

In his notes on the Victoria Bacing Club's September Meeting held on Sept. 26 the "Special Commissioner" of the Melbourne Sportsman writes as follows : — Those who laid the long odds on Eesolute for the September Stakes got a bit of a shock when they saw Bloodshot tackle the colt and bring him to the whip ; but, although the youngster had to be vigorously ridden, he was equal to the occasion, and stalled off the ex-New Zealanders fine run. Kobold ensured a true-run race by making running at a solid pace to well in the straight, and the time recorded, viz., -^mm lltf sec, was very fair when it is remembered that the going was anything but fast after the rain of last week. After the race all sorts of comparisons of the respective form shown by Newhaven and Eesolute were made, and admirers of the first-named colt asserted that had the son of Newminster started he would have won in much more decisive style than Eesolute did. Personally, I think he would have done so, but it must be remembei ed that wheieas Eesolute is one of the lazy, easygoing sort, Newhaven is a particularly free galloper. ',

When Salvator was carrying everything before him (says the American Horseman) and subsequently when all the big prices for the Haggin yearlings were being paid by Maicris Daly, it was said that the California land millionaire and the Montana copper king were in partnership, even if the fact was not then known to the populace. It now transpires that the partnership has been virtual for some years r but is .now to be made actual, and in. 1897- the Haggin-Daly horses, will be raced both East and "West in the famous colours that Salvator, Firenzi, Tammany, Montana, and Senator Grady carried to victory so often. The Haggin and Daly nurseries are the greatest in the world, the two owners together possessing about a thonsand brood mares of the bluest blood, and it is the intention of the partners to divide the cracks in two, sending one-half to England and racing the other half on American tracks. J£B. Haggin and Marcus Daly can put together, if they wish, twenty million English pounds, and it is safe to say that if tneir horses have any success in Albion we will hear little about the raids made on the ring in connection with the victories. Mr Haggin has but lately recovered from a grim wrestle with illness; in fact, his life was despaired of for a time, and he feels that he cannot support the struggle which he underwent when Firenzi and Salvator carried his colours so often to the front. With the pick of some eight hundred | yearlings the Haggin-Daly combination [ should be a winner in England.

Writing in the Illustrated Sporting and Dramatic News of September 5 "Kanger" says : — The Doncaster St Leger, which will be run for on Wednesday next, looks like being about the tamest on record. Persimmon pursues the even tenour of his way at 3 to 1 on, and as he seems to be doing plenty of work and getting through it well it is impossible to think of anything that has the smallest chance of beating him unless it be the French Arreau, whom I am told on very good authority is no wonder. There will probably be more wagering on placing the second for which, after his last week's victory at York, Labrador will doubtless be ' backed. He is a nice wiry little horse, and evidently stays well, as a son of Sheen should. There was, too, decided merit in his easy defeat of Nouveau Riche in the Great Yorkshire Stakes. Nouveau Riche had won four out of five races this year, and as long as he remained unbeaten by any of the St Leger horses there was always an off chance that he might be dangerous, but as at York he finished four lengths behind. Labrador, who was six lengths behind the winner in the Two Thousand Guineas, he must not only be a good deal inferior to Persimmon, but will prob ably be beaten again by his York conqueror, who, although evidently a very improved colt, is hardly in the same class with the Prince of.Wales's lengthy, far-reaching Derby winner. That St Frusquin would have beaten his Epsom conqueror over the longer course at Doncaster is possible, but he would have had to be at his very best, and would have had no chance of doing so after being stopped in his work even for a few days, whilst, as the effort would probably have settled him altogether, his owner -was wise to scratch him, as he did, at once. Helm, after her victory in the Yorkshire 6'aks, may take her chance, but the form was not grand, and she is not likely to . trouble Persimmon. Eegret, the best of the Kingsclere three-year-olds, is said to be coughing. ■ The "Special Commissioner 5 ' of the London 7 Sportsman paid a visit to the Duke

of Westminster's stud at Eaton Hall recently, and he writes of the famous stallion's Bend Or and Ornie as follows : Very rarely can a horse be said to have , made a stud. Some good brood mare is almost invariably responsible for that, and ; Doncaster, no doubt, was aided in no small , degree by the Agnes-bred mares which Mr Snarry brought into publicity, though with Doncaster himself it may be remembered they were by no means an ' unqualified success. Looking, however, at the horses, mares, yearlings, and foals at Eaton now one cannot but see how Doncaster dominates the whole position. His greatest son, the beautiful Bend Or, is still there bearing his nineteen yaers heartily and well, nor is it unlikely that before the year is out some great two-year-old 'by him will come out to remind us what life there still is in the sire, of Ormonde. Whatever temporary falling off there may have been in the racing qualities of Bend Or's stock, there has been nothing but increasing proof of the value of his daughters as brood mares. Quetta, Rydal, and Ornament at this stud — what more praiseworthy matrons can a man find?— all by Bend Or, and all producing successive winners, such as Grey Leg, Helm, Eampion, Bluewater, Labrador, and Brooch. Then, too, Orange, by Bend Or, though drafted from Eaton, left the Duke of Westminster a rare memento in her son, Shaddock. Time flies and we pass from Bend Or to his mosti'arnous grandson, Orme; not Orme as we uyed to see him fighting out desperate battles on the Turf and exciting endless controversy, but Orme, as one of the very finest stallions that man ever beheld, grown quite half an inch since I saw him last, and developed to the greatest perfection of sinewy, blood like power. Quiet and good-tempered, he takes but a careless interest in Mr Fitzpatrick, who is seated, in a corner of the box painting his picture. Not a few times have I stood up alongside Orme and admired that peerless forehand — peerless I say advisedly, at any rate, in my experience—and now all his good points seem better still. Perhaps he is rather more like Ormonde now than he used to be, but he has a character all his own. and those curious semi-lop ears of his are alone sufficient to stamp his individuality. The forejoint where the trouble was that taxed all John Porter's skill during Orme's third season on the turf still catches the eye, but that, of course, is nothing; the horse himself has in every way done well — better than even I ventured to expect. The American Futurity Stakes, which, worth as it is .£I I,OOO, is the richest two-year-old race in the world, was decided on August .15. The following remarks on the fade, taken from the New York. Spirit of the Times, are so interesting that we publish them in full: — The Futurity of 1896 will go \ down into turf history as the greatest surprise of the decade, and will always be regarded as the Marcus Daly Coup Futurity. Never in this country has a great coup been so skilfully manipulated, nor so successfully carried into effect. Moreover, it is doubtful if ever a larger sum of money was taken out of the ring by any stable upon any single event, a conservative estimate by a well-known bookmaker, who was himself caught to the tune of 084000, placing the amount pt ,£33,000. This sum would have been larger had not the ring cried "Hold, Enough," before Mr Daly's commissioners had finished their rounds. Campbell, trainer for Mr Daly, who discovered the great speed of Ogden, performed his share of the coup to perfection, preparing the horse at Saratoga's deserted course, securing an almost unknown though competent jockey to pilot his candidate, and sending him to the post in the pink of condition. As to the race itself, Ogden showed himself a remarkably fast and thoroughly game colt, placing the Futurity record (distance six furlongs) a fall second lower than the best previous (Imin llsec) by The Butterflies, in 1894, and winning handily by one and a half lengths. Although the Futurity has been the only true test of his quality, and it is a well-known fact that one swallow does ] not make a summer, the greatness of the ; performance stamps Ogden as the best colt of the year, Ornament being excepted until these youngsters have , another and more favourable opportunity i fora meeting. There can be no question : but that the owners of Ornament made a ; grievous error in putting up upon their ( heavy-headed colt Sloan, a boy weighing : only seven stone, compelling their entry to ■ carry 191bs of dead weight. Sloan, though . the cleverest of oiir lightweights, was unable to keep the sluggish son of Order ( with the leader in the early part of the race, . and though he finally succeeded in rousing Ornament in the last three-eighths, the , effort was not only too late, but seemed to : have cost him all his strength, as he could < not hold Ornament together after he had , made up his ground. As to Ogden, there is little to be said . as far as the actual . running of the race is concerned, except . that he secured the lead at the start, held ' it throughout, Ornament alone of the entire field coming alongside of him, and ' filially won handily by a length and a half , from Ornament, who was two find a half lengths in front of the despised outsider Eodermond. The Keene filly , Ehodesia, second favourite at three , to one, ran a most disappointing , race, finished a bad fourth, and must be considered a jade, though there is no faster two-year-old in the country when she chooses to run. From a breeding point of view the Futurity was a, triumph for English and Irish blood over American families, as Kilwailin, Ogden's sire, is Irish bred, while Oriole, dam of the Futurity winner, is an English mare. Kilwarlin, the sire of Ogden, was bred in 1884 by the late Tom Connolly, trainer at Curragh View, County Kildare, Ireland, and is the fourth produce of Hasty Girl, who is by Lord Gough. Kilwarlin was purchased when a yearling by James McKenna, the trainer, who sold him about Christmas that year to Mr C. J. Blake, who gave 1000 guineas for him on behalf of Captain Machell and himself. His racing career was creditable, and among other victories gained by him was the St Leger of 1887. He was defeated in the Jubilee Stakes by Bendigo, and in the Rous Memorial by the mighty Ormonde. His last race was in the Tenth Great Challenge Stakes at Newmarket, Friday, October 14, 1887, in which he carried 9st 21b and easily defeated Frondeuse, Wise Man, Fleur de Marie and Bella Donna. He is by all odds the best son of Arbitrator. Kilwarlin's best winners in England this season are Kilcock and Hebron. Kilwarlin was sold at TattersalTs Newmarket sales, July 15, 1895, to Sir E. Affleck for 1500 guineas. Oriole, the dam of Ogden, »vas bred in 1887 by the Duke of Westminster, got by Bond Or, her dam, Feuella, by Canibuscan, out of La Favorite, by Monarque. She was sold at Tattersall's, Dec. 14, 1893, to Mr J. McCaig, agent for Mr Marcus Daly, for 520 guineas, and was then in foal to Kilwarlin. Feuella., the dam of Oriole, throw Douranee, by Eosicrucian, and also Eossiter, by Eosiirncian. Eossiter was bred by Mr W. Bienkiron. Althoughla cripple, he was imported by Mr Charles Eeed, of the Fair view Stud, for stud duty, he paying 500 guineas for him. Douranee was th? dam of Quetta (by Bend Or), who threw Groy Leg, by Pepper and Salt; Cayenne, by Pepper and Salt, and Helm, by Morion. La Favorite, the dam of Fuella, was the dam of Flageolet, the sire of imp. Eayon d'Or. The gross value of the race was .£11,400, of which .£BBSB goes to the winnei'. ■

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Bibliographic details

AUSTRALIAN AND FOREIGN SPORTING., Star, Issue 5700, 20 October 1896

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2,431

AUSTRALIAN AND FOREIGN SPORTING. Star, Issue 5700, 20 October 1896

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