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AUSTRALIAN AND FOREIGN.

The Australian-bred horse Moorehouse recently died in India. After hia racing career in India he was purchased by the Government for atnd purposes, and was located at one of the best breeding depdts, where while being brought out of his box he reared and fell back, fracturing his skull. Moorehouae w&b by Moorthorpe from Geraldine,' by Tattendonfrom Atholine by Blair Athol. Iq Australia he won in Mr W« A. Long's colours the Sydney Tattersall's Club Lady Carrington Plate, Victoria Racing Club Nnrßery Handicap, and Victoria Amateur Turf Club Hawksburn Handicap. Shortly after the purchase of Carbine by the Duke of Portland Mr C. M'lvor sent him a larga radiated pedigree, tabulated in the style which has been copyrighted by the designer. The receipt of the pedigree appears to have given his Grace great pleasure and satisfaction, for in addition to expressing his approval of ib, he haß written deßiring Mr M'lvor to similarly work out the breeding lines of the following horses which he owns: St Simon, by Galopin; Ayrshire, by Hampton ; Denovan, by Galopin ; St Serf, by St Simon ; Eaeburn by St Simon $ Kilmarnock, broterh to Ayrshire; Child of the Mist, by Blair Athol; Johnny Morgan, by Springfield? Havoc, by Tnnnderbolt; Mate, by Blandford; Ajax, by Donova'n. The Duke of Portland expresses himself pleased with his new purchase, and anticipaios successful results from the mating oF Carbine with the St Simoa and other mares which will ba put to him.

That flourishing charity, th« Bentinck — Pand,- was originated by. and not merely n&tndd aft or, ad many doubtless imagine, Lord George Bentinck. Shortly after bis ' appearance with the flag at Doncaster (aaya an exchange) a publio testimonial wftfl got up for his lordship, and all sorts and conditions of sportsmen literally . hurried up to hand in their contributions. It. was a testimonial collected on a scale of vr&ich anyone might have been proud, and there ib not the least doubt but that it wbb a source of intense gratification to itsnobJe recipient. The sum Dubßcribed amounted to several thousands of pounds sterling ; and how nobly lie acted when he received it . From hia own private fortune he added a large donation to the amount presented to him by the unanimous vote of gratitude and esteem on the part of the motley community over whom he exerted such a lordly sway. And then he placed the whole sum in the bands of permanent trustees for the aid and maintenance of distressed jockeys and traiuera' families, to be denominated for.- over the Bentinck Benevolent Fund. .-■ It'-If, we believe, to this fund that the guitea each jockey pays annually for his license to ride is devoted, while » further aeuKCo of -sustenance ib furnished by sundry :&aoH exacted by the strtwards or race meetirga and the Jockey Club. Ih hia review of the ficßt day's lacing of

the South Australian Jockey cluVe sapSß?m&2L s earned the palm Thu is a really beautiful mare, and although she looked rather above herself John Hill waa confident she would win. Freda is another charming i^S Martin was not very sanguine. -Birksgate ; has improved very much since the spring,, S,u fc li " Pffbable that Thunderer has not. . The two fillies Freda ana Amaru had the . fun to themselves and the former won nicely at the finish, while Gehenna «"> pnsed everyone by getting third. The : Leger was a great surprise, »8 " ? looked a moral but the Trenton filly ; Haughtineas just managed to beat her. Destiny was too sore.to extend himself . Her race in the South Australian Stakes must have done Aurana good, as she stayed out the distance in the Elder Stakes ; A. Taylor, the well-known Victorian i trainer.waspresent at the South Australian \ Jockey Club's Autumn Meeting. Taylor j waa interviewed and a portion of hw re- 1 marks are exceedingly interesting to New Zealanders. They are as follow :—" This ; is my firßt vißib to Adelaide, and if I were i leaving Victoria Adelaide is where I would ; make for. The climate is splendid for man •■ and horae, and I should like very much to : live here. With reepect to the totalisator, ; I am convinced that it is the only thing J that will purify the sport, and we are sure <. to have it in Victoria soon. Here a man, j say with ,£lO in his pocket, can put it in : the machine, and if he loses he can tdo i anything on the nod. With -the book- ; makers a man can put .£lO on a horse and lose it straight away. Then he goes to "the books/ and on the nod lays another •tenner/which he also loses. Thinking he has a good show perhaps in the last race, he puta down £20 on the'nod'in the hope oP recovering bia lobs, but leaves the track £40 out of pocket. Thoro is no betting on the nod with the totalisator, and in that respeot it is a veiy groat improvement. I Bhould be very sorry to see it abolished, as unqueßtionably it is the only way of purifying racing." • If Captain Webb stands a thorough preparation and starts for the Victorian Grand National Hurdle Bace, he is sure to be supported in New Zealand. The following remarks, on hU display in the hurdle race at the Victoria Amateur Turf Club's meeting on May 4, which appeared in the Melbourne Sportsman, may therefore be interesting and instructive :— No matter how good horses may be, the beat of them require condition to aid them before they can be expected to show their true worth. Evidence in support of this reasoning was provided at Caul field on Saturday in more than one case, but especially by the poor exhibition made by the htghly-thought-of Captain Webb in the Hurdle Eace. JLb far a? looks went, there was nothing in the race in the same street as the Maorilander. Captain, I Webb certainly is a gentleman in ■ formation, and moreover, he ie, when j well, unquestionably a dandy both on the .flat and over hurdles. But to one not I very intimately acquainted with him. Mr Gollan's horse appßared on Saturday to be not quite at hrn best. Notwithstanding this, how«ver, Captain Webb had any amount of baokerß, who would not hear jo£ Jllß defeat, aad argtted that" he'd only I want'to behalf well to beat that crowd." rHowfartbea& people were astray in their j calculations the reault nhowed. Captaia ! Webb jumped a bit anyhow, but he ; manaered to hold his own for just about j half the journey, when he had had quite i enough, and from that out he fell away. As before said, the Captain is, no doubt, 1 a big cut above the average when all right; i but, as on this occasion he did not have ■ that necessary good staying condition to j see him through, he bad perforce to give i way to others—inferior, perhaps, but more ; fit for the battle. . MrC. Duncan's Euclid (6yrs, 7st 121 b) i won the Lincolnshire Handicap (run over ! a mile) in lmin 44*aec, and the value of the = stakes was J61415. Last year Baron de 1 Eothschild'a Le Nipham (4yrs # Bst 71b) j covered the course in lmin 43aec, and the stakes amounted to .£1505} and in the i previous season, when Mr J. W. Smith's I Wolf's Crag (3yre, 6at 7lb) was successful, ! the time occupied was lmin 46Bec, and the stakes were represented by £1600. In | 1892 Sir J. Blundell Maple's Clarence ; (Syrs, 6st 8lb) won in lmin 45|3eq, and credited his owner with ,£1695, while in 1891 Prince Soltykoff'a Lord George (syra, Bsfc) went the cpurae in lmin 44Jsec, and the stakeß were worth J61685. In 1890, when Mr,J. O'Neill's The Eejectod (6yrs, Bat Hlb) was succesßful, the time was lmin 50sec, and the value of the stakes ,£1455. In 1889, Sir E. Jardine's Wiseman (4yrs, 7at 81b) won in j lmin 47f aec, and the value of the Btakea j was 15a. Mr Legh's Veracity (4yrs, 6at 10lb) scored in the previous year and went the distance in lmin 42f«ec, the stakes then amounting £1684 15s. In 1887, Mr Manton's Oberon (4 yrs, 7st 81b) was the winner, the time on that occasion being j lmin 45faec, and the value of the stakes ; £1584 15b. The records for several previous • years follow: 1886, Mr Nayletfs Pulmen j (6yrs, 7st 131 b), time lmin 41sec, value .^61634 15s ; 1885, ,Mr H. T, Barclay's Bendigo (syre, Bit 61b), time lmin S6|3eo, value J81724 15* j 1884, Mr J. W. Smithes Tonans (6yrs, Bsc 41b), time lmin 43sec,

value .£1734 153 ; 1883, Mr J. Davis's Knight of Burghley (aged, 7st 8lb), time

lmin 48faec, value £1414 15a ; 1882, Count F. de Lagrange's Poulet (syre, Bst7lb), time lmin 43-j-aec, Value 159 ; 1881, W. S. Crawiurd'a Buchanan (4yra, 6st 101 b), time lmia 45seo, value .£1925. One day towards the end of March "Vigilant"; of the: London Sportsman paid a visit to Newmarket, and the following ate some of the notes he wrote upon, what he saw : — Just aa I was struck by' Sir Visto at this time; last year, so was I now by a two-year old colt named WinterKing, a beautiful mover, and very promising. Gallican led Sir Visto, and here it is undeniable that the Derby horse has been making all possible improvement since last season, and for action . he cannot bo beaten— unlesß, indeed, it may be by this other, who follows on, in the wake of Chad, with Craig Crook behind him. Needleaa to say I refer to Ladas, than whom a finer mover never was seen. Striding at his ease up the hill, he looks a perfect picture; and there can be no doubt of hiß well-being, Big and hearty a'ter a winter's rest Ladas, if all goes well with him, will readily smash up all possible opponents fchia year. After this we saw Prieetholme leading Eaconteur, Isinglass, United, Balweary, and Kilsallaghan a nice gallop of a mile or so, and the brother to Childwick went well, though hardly 36 well as Sir Visto. The rather long and peculiar head of Raconteur always makes him easily recognisable, and I had a close look at him as he passed, the impression left being not altogether favourable — I mean he did not strike me aa having come on very much since last season— but a mere impression of this kind is not to be trusted, and I hope to ccc Baconteur several timea again before he carries silk thia year. IsinglaßS was evidently doing well. Walking back to the town we were treated to a view of the American horses whose boys

ride in Btrange fashion — from our point of view— so short that the one on Stouenell had his knees somewhero about ihe florae's withers and hia feet reaching forward as if | to clear the way for the subsequent j approach of Stoneneil, who is a good stamp ! of horse and goes well. Montauk is, a fine j colt, and Banquet, ridden by the jockey ! Siina, went a good speed gallop in good j form, though how the American horsaman j will acquit himoelf against our jockey* I | should ba r.fraid <;o prophesy. Certain it ia that if his Btyle ia right ours must In wrong. I understand that the boys wtio ride the horses have no other work to do, : strappera being engaged for the stable business, e.o ihece yoiing gentlemou, who light up their cigarettes as they ride off the Heath through the town, must indeed have fin easy time of it. j London, March 30. After the long, dull winter we have

J^TSK Sd £^bXth£ sK3SBeSr 2 Jjewor^ , absent from the Car. *"" J Kor that " the boys " are nar Jdw. Hot that thcHbof. ge P« f* to.keep the Lgs clear, and very well i i . afternoon seldom °P e°f of a n particu Lly thrilling character, g^ere £ the bettii on th/ big handi. °™™ watclK Up t0 Monday few oomaisJ*™ w £ wor P th the na y me, had been ;££&. El Diablo, 6yrs, Bst 81b, was the JJ*£ winter fayo y uti' tej and * a nttle X" hftd dribbled on Amandier, aged, * Dumbarton 4yrs 9st, and Lottie'a "J * The investment of J«™'J • however, have brought any- *™'" • h' eftd rf affairfl, Oa tning c wafl d , gJJJ™^. a trial by Shanorotha, and s fc c^mencad ia fine, bright eunwitn tntJ Triai stakes, in which Mr Coben» 8 Qre9n Lawn, 4yrs, 9st 111 b, by E en( j ai,_Buda, easily defeated six others, Qreen Lawn bejng the. trial horße of Missal for the bj handicap,. the latter came with ft rush in the betting, and from 15' a waa bacted down to 100 to 8* A Sailing Plate fonowed> i n which Charlie Archer threw a Baoo6Bßfai mai n wjth Armoire, 3yra, 9at glb b Hagioscope—Excellence. There were nintt runnerßj and the price of Bto 1 Qn offjjr againßt the winner did not look lik<J oao of Archer's good things. The filly won> no. weverf though only by a 8h * rfc headi from Mt Miller's Blank D 8 _ rßj 9fl(. slb) Mr Jackson's Watch To^ er gyts, lOst 71b, third.. It then tralJSpired a ni Cc B.p. cov%< had been i&a^ and that the London bookies were «touched" for substantial sums, Tho Northern Welter, over a mile, fell to the favonrite. Queen's Jester, 3yrß, 83t 61b by Sycophant—Poem, and the first two-year-old race of the Be*son to. General Owon -wiUiamß's filly by Hambletonian— p anacea There were a dozen runneta for tfaß j atter> but barring Mr L. de Eothsohiid' B Violent*, they were not much to look at# t db fiatthyany Stakeß is a handiCftp north 600 soys, and run over the straight .five furlongs. On Monday there were fourteen runners, the favourite being M. Lebaudy's Pet of the Fancy, at 9to 2, syrs, Bst slb, Mr Ryan's Chasseur, 3yrs, 7 8t 131 b, being also well backed at 6to 1. Bar the trio, notbipg carriad really heavy metal, though, at 10 (to l r Mr de Bothsohild's Grig, 3yrs, Ttt 81b, Mr Marshall's Ganges, 4yra, Bat 51b and Mr Bankeas's Sally Brass IE, Syrs, 9at lib were occasionally backed. The race proved a good thing for Grig (by Crafton —Merrie Lassie);, as, after the favourite and Chasseur had looked well below the distance, Mr Leo> de Rothschad's colt shot out and won in. a. canter by three-quarters of %' length from chassenr, with Sir J; 8.. Mapio'a Eatar. third.' ' • ; ' The first big handicap of the season ia run oTer a straight mile, and worth 1000 BOra> The roll of winners includes some .go9d horses, notably Vulcan, Controversy, Bendigo, Veracity and Wiße Man. On Tuesday there were fifteen runners only, tne field being the smallest since Royal g^ waa BuccessCul ia 1870.. In 1874, -^ Arpher.., won.' on tomahawk, there thit^-aveatarterßi and The Gunner in 187S, and Footatep.in ISME; each. defeated thirty-one-,others. Directly the weights appeared Colonel ]jorth'a El Diablo, 6yre, 8«t 81b,. was matked down " good goodp^'and weight of money at last made him a strong favourite at&tol. Nexfc in demand were Amandier, aged, Bst 31bi The Qwl,,3yrai. Gat 61b, and Dumbarton, 4y re, 9at, at 9- to 1 each* and at this- price the Jubilee winner of 1892, Euclid, 6yrs, 7et 121 b, was also well backed. Later, however, Mr Duncan's colt was easier, and 12 to 1 could be had. Missal, 4 yrß> e ßt 131 b, had friends at 10 to 1, and of the outsiders, Carrick, aged, Bat 21b, at \qq to 6, seemed moat fancied. Misßal got the best of a good start, and made tne running, with Marnovia, Sancho .p anza and; Earl of Annandale in close Dursuit, and the favonrite, Amandier and, Euclid next. They kept this 'order for, rathermore than six furlongs, when Missal compounded, and shortly after Sancho p ftnzft and Earl of Annandale were also i n distress. Euclid then went to the front, and at the distance was challenged by the favourite and Amandier. Neither, howeTerj coui d collar him, and drawing away, the aon of Prism won by a length and a fcalf, wjth Amandier a respectable third. Euclid, by Prism from a. mare by Speculum _Nydia» belongs to Mr Dnncan, of the stock Exchange, and had been unfortunate Hince he scored as a three-year-old at Kempton, running in upwards of a dozen b j g race 3 without securing a winning bracket. He is engaged in the Kempton jubilee Stakeß this spring, but a i4\b penalty bringß hiß weight np to Bst 91b, under which the old horse can s3arcely be dangerous. El Diablo ran well, and with Euclid away would have won easily enough, bat Dumbarton cut np wretchedly, and the three-year-olda were never prominent. Twenty-one runners went to the post for the Brocklesby Stakee, but. I have only time, now; to pay ihe race fell to Mr Wallace Johnstone^a Kyoto (by Miguel), who beat Mr I'Anson's Salebeia by a head. , —-

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https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/TS18950530.2.42.3

Bibliographic details

AUSTRALIAN AND FOREIGN., Star, Issue 5271, 30 May 1895

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AUSTRALIAN AND FOREIGN. Star, Issue 5271, 30 May 1895

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