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Australian and Foreign.

la the House of Commons on. June 8, Mr W. Johnston said : I wish to ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer a question, of . which I have not given private notice. It is whether it is the case that the Prime Minister is about to introduce a Bill in the other House to prohibit betting and . gambling. (Laughter). ) The Chancellor of the Exchequer : I have no cognisance of , the proceedings in the other House. I have a great deal to do in looking after 1 the proceedings of this House. (Laughter). For some days before the race for the Derby Lada9 was shadowed by zealous detectives, one of whom in his excitement after the race violently smote to the i earth an excitable person who wished to pat the winner. Nor was this the only curious incident connected with the police protection accorded to Ladas, for Lord Bosebery* himself, who had ventured to approach as the horae was being brought from The Durdana under escort before the race, was loudly and peremptorily ordered , to "take that dog up," there being a > terrier somewhere near him. The progeny of Sir Modred have been ! wonderfully successful in America. At i the meetings of the Brooklyn Jockey Club and New York Jockey Club, extending > from May 15 to June 19, they won no less ' than sixteen races, the majority of which were for two-year-olds. These eventb included the Great Eclipse Stakes of a guaranteed sum of 4000 soys, and probably worth more — the richest stake run up to that time during the present season — in which Connoisseur and Sir Galahad, both sons of Traducer's greatest son, finished first and second. On the second day of the Victorian Eacing Club's Grand National Meeting, as the cable has already informed us, Daimio 9at 31b won the Grand National Steeplechase, beating Cerberus 9st 81b and Reckless 9at 61b. Daimio was ridden by M. Bourke. Mutiny, who was ridden by Fergus, was not mentioned in the betting, but he finished fifth. Tayforth fell, and Mikado 11. was pulled up at the home turn. The Hurdle Race of 200 soys, two mileß, waa won by Apsley list 51b, with Neli list 41b second, the pair thuß filling the positions they occupied in the 1 Grand National Hnrdle Baca. The Lawn Handicap, of 200 boys, six furlonga, went to Erl Kingr 7efc 101 b, beating Tyraa 7st lib and Tassy Bat 101 b $ and Theodore 7et 51b, by Splendor, annexed the July Handicap, beating John S. 7st 111 b and i Croesy 9st 31b. M. Cannon, the well-known horeeman, attained his majority in May. He i has, since his marriage, settled down . at the lovely old spot named Ridgeway, near Southampton (E)» There ■ (says an exchange) his friends, in- ; eluding a contingent from Nottingi ham, gathered to celebrate the "double event" of the birthday and the house- [ warming. From all accounts " things . hummed." Afc midnight on Monday the i cup given to Morny on hi 3 wedding by the "Danebury Hunt" was filled, and the , health of " Morn and his wife " was duly ■ honored, together with various other toasts, i so various indeed that when Mr Willie Ford, who was one of the house-party, re- ' tired for the night, he repeated an award ' rendered famous first at Hurst Park, and ! in giving his decision upon the re3ult of the proceedings, declared it a " dead-heat • won by a neck." [ The following is the substance of an ■ interview between the special Commissioner of the London Sportsman and M. Dawson ; a day or two before the decision of the i Derby :— " I say, and I say it emphatically, > that Ladas is the beßt-looking horse I ever saw, and I've seen all the best for many ', years now.'* "And would you call him , the best as well as the best looking, Mr l Daweon?" "Ah, that is impossible to cay, for you know as much about him as I , do; no one knows how good he is, any i niora than we knei? about St. Simon." " Yes, that was an extraordinary horse indeed ; he could beat such as Harvester

and Busybody as if they were common platers, and though he and Minting, of course, never came together, lam satiefied from their trials that St Simon was at least a etone the better, and on that I proclaim that he would have heaten Ormonde." " And Ladas ia poasibly aa good as St Simon ? " "I have no reason to doubt it; be has not yet been 80 highly tried in public, that is all." Since 1889, new conditions governing the value and system of forfeit in connection with the Derby have been in operation, and the winner ia now guaranteed a fixed sum regardless of tbe number of subscribers and independently of any Bum that may be added from tbe race fund. By his success this year Lord Eosebery's' Ladas won £5450, according to the conditions as they stand, whilst last year Mr M' Calm on t, as tbe owner of Isinglass, received .£5515, including 60 BOVB Burplua entrance money. In 1892 Lord Bradford, who won with Sir Hugo, bccured £6960, that sum embracing 1000 soys given from the fund and 510 soys surplus entrance money. In 1891 Sir F. Johnstone, aa the owner and nominator of Common, won £5510, the odd soya representing two fines impoeed for the correction of entries. In 1890 (when the new conditions obtained for the first time) Sir J. Miller's Sainfoin credited his owner with £5330, of which amount 430 sots represented the surplus subscriptions given to the winner. The Duke:of Portland's Donovan, in 1889, won £4550, and the previous year, when the same owner's Ayrobire waa victorious, the value of the race was £3675, while in 1887, when it fell to the late Mr Abington's Merry Hampton, the states were worth £4525. In 1886, when Ormonde won for the Duke of Westminster, the value was £4700, and the previous season Melton credited Lord Hastings with £4525. Some previous records are appended : In 1884, when the race resulted in a dead-heat between Mr J. Hammond's St Gatien and Sir J. Willoughby's Harvester, the value of the stakes was £4850; in 1883, Sir P. Johnstone's St Blaise, £5150} 1882, Duke of Westminster's Shotover, £4775; 1881, Mr P. Lorillard's Iroquoie, £5925 ; 1880, Duke of Westminster's Bend Or, £6375.. The richest Derby on record was that of Lord Lyon in 1866, who then won for Ilia owner£73so. The time occupied by Lord Eosebery's Ladas in winning the Derby (run over about one mile and a half) was, according to Benson's chronograph, 2min 45faec. • A twelvemonth ago Isinglaiß covered the course in 2min 43sec, thus equalling the | previous recordß held by Kettledrum (1861), Blair Athol (1864), Merry Hamp- [. ton 1887), and Ayshire (1888). In 1892 ■ Lord Bradford's Sir Hugo occupied 2min. 1 44 sec, while the previous season Sir F. i Johnßtone's Common took 2min 56fsec, and in 1890 Sir J, Miller's Sainfoin won in . 2tnin 49f sec. In 1889 the .Duke of Port- [ land's Donovan was successful in 2min ■ 44§see, Ayrshire, also the property of the i Duke of Portland, occupying 2min 43aec in 1888. In 1887 the late Mr ' Abington's Merry Hampton made the . same record, and in 1886 the Duke of Westminster's Ormonde went the course \ in 2min 45§sec, against the 2mm 44|sec of Lord Hastingß's Melton in 1885. When ' Mr J. Hammond's St Gatien and Sir J. i Willougbby's Harvester ran a dead heat in 1884 the lime was 2min 46|sec, and ■ that of Sir F. Johnat one's' St Blaise, in 1883, 2min 48-jjsec Times for several • previous years: 1882, Duke of Westminster's Shotover, 2min 45f sec ; 1881, Mr \ P. Lorillard's Iroquois, 2min 50sec ; 1880, i Duke of Westminster's Bend Or, 2min i 46sec. Whan the conditions of the Derby were [ altered, those of the Oaks were changed on the same lines, but the amount guaranteed ',: to the winner is not bo large. The value of , the race won by the Duke of Portland's i Amiable was £4150, and laßfc year, when Mrs Butterwick won in the came ownership, , the stakes amounted to £5130 (including i the surplus entrance money of 980 soys). In i' 189?, when Baton de Hirsch's La Fleche i was successful, the amount credited to her was £5270, including the surplus entrance money (620 soys) and 500 eovs 1 given from the fund. In 1891 Mr N. Fenwiok's Mimi iron £4405, the odd i 5 soys representing a fine imposed for the 1 correction of an entry. In the previous ' season, when the Duke of Portland won , with Memoir, the stakes amounted to £4400, and in 1889 Lord E. Churchill's L'Abbease de Jouarre won £2600. In 1883, when Lord .Calthorpe's Seabreeze wa3 the winner, the stakes were £2950, and in 1887 Ee\ c dOr credited the Duke ! of Beaufort with £3300, while in 1886, when Miss Jummy won in the Duke of Hamilton's colourp, tke stakes were worth £3250. We append the values for several preceding years: 1885, Lord Cadogan'a Lonely, £3350; 1884; Mr AbiDgton's liuey- ! body, £3425 ; 1883, Lord Eosebery's Bonny Jean, £3475" ; 1882, Lord Stamford's Geheimniss, £3375, 1881, Mr W. S. Crawford's Thebais, £4050; 1880, Mr Perkins's Jenny Howlet, £4500. The Duke of Portland's Amiable won the Oaks Stakes (run over about a mile and a half) in 2min SOsec, while last year, when Mrs Butterwick won in the same ownership, [the time was 2min 44 faec. In 1892 Baron de Hirsch's La Fleche won in 2 min 43£ see, against the 2min 54|sec of Mr N. Fenwick's Mimi in 1891, an* the 2min 40f 36c of the Duke o£ Portland's Memoir in 1890, the best on record in connection with the race. In 1889 Lord Eandolph Churchill's L'Abbasse de Jouarre won in 2min 453 ec, and in 1888 Lord Calthorpe's Seabreeze occupied 2min 42|b63, which was record time up to that date. In 1887 the Dute of Beaufort'B Eeve dOr took 2min 50|aec, and in 1886 the Duke of Hamilton's Miss Jummy covered the course in 2min 54§sec. Lonely, in 1885, in Lord Cadogan's colours, was timed at 2min 43f see, and the following are the records for a number of previous winners : 1884., Mr Abington's Busybody, 2min 49aec ; 1883, Lord Eosebery's Bonny Jean, 2min 53sec; 1882, Lord Stamford's Geheimniss, 2min 59secj 1881, Mr W. S. Crawfurd's Thebais, 2min 46secj 1880, Mr Perkins's Jenny Howlet, 2min 49iec. A vast crowd, inoluding many notables, among whom were the late President and Madame Carnot, witnessed the running of the Grand Prix de Paris at Longchamps, on Sunday, June 17. Considerable feeling had bien developed because of the fact that the English colt Matchbox hßd been purchased and sent to France for the purpose of winning the event. There were apprehensions of a riot in case Matchbox should win, and some 1100 policemen and 500 guards wero at the course to preserve order. Matchbox, however, wbb defeated by a neck by Baron A. deSchickler's Dolma Baghtche and all danger of mob violence was averted. The finish for the race aroused the wildest enthusiasm. There were eleven starters. The ;betting was 11 to 2 against Dolma Baghtche, 7 to 4 on Matchbox, 20 to 1 against Mansour, 6 to 1 Gospodar, 12 to 1 Toujours, 30 to 1 Veronious, 50 to 1 Le Pompon, 60 to 1 each Ravioli, Vendeenne and Labira, and 100 to 1 Gouvernail. Eavioli and Matchbox at once went to the front, with Gouvernail, Toujours, Le Pompon, Gospodar, Dolma Baghtche, Lahire, and Veronious following in the order named. There was no change in the relative positions of the horses until they entered the straight. Then Eavioli yielded gradually to Dolma Baghtohe. The remainder of the race was a magnificent neck-and-neck contest between Dolma Baghtohe and Matchbox, and in the last few Btrideß the former drew out and won by a neck. Matchbox finished two lengths in front of Mansour, and the latter one length ahead of Gospodar. "Verax" in the Sydney Referee gives an interesting account of an interview he had with* an old Sydney trainer. Here are some extracts from it : — In answer to a question as to the best two-year-old of the year, he said, " The beet j two-year-old ? Why, Nobleman, by The I Peer out of Paradox, and the beat bred colt !in Australia, too. You don't know his { dam P Well, my boy, I do; and only for ; getting cast in her box while baing 1 saved for the Newmarket you would ! have known her, too. You know I have i had Borne pretty good 'uns through my handß in the old squire's time." " Yes, hang ypu, I do," remarked the other man, , " You out me out of £2000 once with a horae called Fireworks." •' Yes, I know about that," said the old man, " but I

mean real good 'nna— Myall King, &<»• Well, let me tell you about the colt's dam. We could have put Abercorn down with her." "Oh! nonsense, old man. Draw it Blow. That's a bit too strong," was the reply. "Not a bit. I Bay she could have beaten Abercorn over a mile. She was never tried further. How da I know? Wel|, I'll tell you. Ypw can remember how The Charmer stuck to him once or twice. We tried The Chaimer and Paradox together over a mile and over six furlongß at evena, and Bhe donkeylicked The Charmer both timeß. Thai's bow I know. I broke her in, and I have seen her do her six furlongs, with heavy shoes on, inside lmin ISsec, and there ain't many that ran do that fairly and squarely, is there now ? And tbat i? how I am sure we could have downed the old champion (with The Charuser aa trying tackle) with Nobleman's dam." The following account of various events run at Ascot wsb cabled to American papers: — The Aecot Stibei?, of 20 boys each, with 1000 soys added, two miles, was the feature of the racing on the firat day. It was won by Mr A. Taylor, jun'a, four-year-old Aborigine, by Exile 11. from Kookaburra. Sir R. J^rdine's Red Ensign waa second and Mr T. Wadlow's Spindle Leg third. Tne other starters were— Irish Wake, Avoir, Kilsallaghan, Theseus, Glengall, Quilon, "HoundEditch and Hettio Sorrel. The betting was 8 to I agst Aborigine, 7 to 1 Red Ensign, Bto 1 Spindle Leg, 5 to 1 each Irish Wake and Avoir, 7 to 1 Kilsallaghan, 8 to 1 Theaeus, 12 to 1 each Glengall, Quilon and Houndaditcb, and 17 to 1 Hettie Sorrel. Aborigine won by two lengths from Red Ensign, who beat Spindle Leg by a length. Quilon was fourth, only a head away. Time — 3min 43f sec. The Prince of Wales' Stakes, of 50sova each, with 1000 added, for three-years-old, about one mile and five furlongs, waa won by Mr Henry Milner's Contract, by leonomy, from Wedding Ring. Lord Bradford's Beighterton was second and Mr Douglas Baird's Sempronius was third. El Gauoho also started. The betting was 4to 1 agßt Contract, 5 to 2 Beighterton, 6 to 4 Semproniuo, 4 to 1 El Gaucho. The Gold Vase, value 200 sove, given by her Majesty, added to a sweeps! akea of 20 soys each, for three-year-oldß and upward*, two miles, was won by Lord Penrhyn's Quaesitum, with Lord Cadogan's Sarana, by Saraband — Wild Hyacinth second, and Mr J. B. Burton's Barmecide, third. The betting was 5 to 1 agst Qaaesitnm, 10 to 1 each Sarana and Barmecide, 2 to 1 Paddy, 4 to 1 Childwick, 8 to 1 Irish Car, 10 to 1 each Montezuma and Golden Slipper. The Coventry Stakee, of 10 bovb each, 1000 added, for twoyear-oldß went to Mr Dobell's Whieton. Mr D. Cooper's Saintly was second and Mr W. Johnstono's Galinne (late Royal Bride) third. The betting was 17 to 1 agst Whiston, 4 to 1 Saintly, 20 to 1 Galinne, 9 to 2 Humphrey Clinker, 6 to 1 Beckhampton, 8 to 1 each Chasseur and Tarporley, 10 to 1 Briardale, 12 to 1 each. La Sagesse aud Dro3B, 14 to 1 Galeotta, 20 to 1 each Oriental Princess and Jaunting Car. Whieton won by half a length. Saintly was six lengths ahead of Galinne. The Royal Hunt Cup, a piece of plate valued at 500 bovb, added to a handicap sweepstakes of £0 soys each, new mile (seven furlongs and 166 yards), was won by Mr T. Worton's Victor Wild, four years old, by Albert Victor, from Wild Huntress 5 Sir W. Throckmorton's Avington was second, and Mr H. E. Beddington's Maundy Money third. The other starters were Amandier, Cabin Boy, Adoration, Haut Brion, Oatlancle, Nobleman, Llanthony. Sweet Duchesa, Court Ball, Molly Morgan, Juvenal, Pennyless, Pitcher, Lady Hermit, Mrs Butterwick, Indian Queen, Evermore, Barbary, Shelley, Laodamia and Qui kly Wise. The betting waß fiO to 1 agßt Victor Wild, 25 to 1 Avington, 10 to 1 Maundy Money, 7 to 1 Amandier, 3 to 1 Cabin Boy, 10 to 1 Adoration, 14 to 1 each Haut Brion, Oatlands and Nobleman, 17 to 1 each Llanthony, Sweet Duchess and Court Ball, 18 to 1 Molly Morgan, 20 to I Juvenal, 25 to 1 Pennyleßs, 33 to 1 each Pitcher and Lady Hermit, 40 to leach Mrs Batter wick t lndian Queen and Evermore, 50 to 1 each Barbary and Shelley, and 100 to 1 each Laodatnia and Quickly Wise. Victor Wild won by half a length.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/TS18940730.2.53

Bibliographic details

Australian and Foreign., Star, Issue 5014, 30 July 1894

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2,907

Australian and Foreign. Star, Issue 5014, 30 July 1894

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