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Frederic Jones, M.H.R.

[jETAT 58.J By the death of Mr Frederic Jones, M.H.R., for Heathcote, who died in Christchurch early this morning, the community loses one of its most useful members. Possessed of considerable ability and energy, but unobtrusive withal, Mr Joneu was a representative of a class of men whose influence in a' young country is none the less powerful and beneficial for being, to some extent, unobserved. Though not a robußt man physically, he was a hard worker, for many years on his own behalf, and for many years more in the service of the community. In both public and private life he was consistent, tolerant, and painstaking, and in both he was respected. He had what is commonly termed " a mind for details," and this made him a most useful member of the many local governing bodies with which he was connected. Probably no man in the Colony had a better knowledge of local government matters, and of the various Acts of Parliament relating thereto, On this subject he was looked up to as an authority in all the public bodies to which be belonged. It need scarcely be said, therefore, that he was a strong Bupporter of local government, and a determined opponent of centralism. In affairs connected with the industrial progress of the community he took a deep and intelligent interest, and in this connection it may be mentioned that the last public act of his life was the discharge of his duties as a member of the Sweating Commission. Mr Jones was fifty-eight years of age at the time of his death, having been born in 1832. He was the third son of Mr John Humphreys Jonos, of Arley Castle, Shropshire, and waß descended from one of the oldest Welsh families, that of Sir Thomas Jones, of Stanley Hall, High Sheriff of Shropshire, heir of Sir Thomas Jones, Chief Justice o£ the Comt of Common Pleas; who devised his estates to his maternal cousin Thomas Tyrwhitt, who by the testator's wish assumed the surname of Jones. The present holder of the title is Sir H.T.Tyrwhitt,'of Stanley Hall. Mr Jones was a first cousin of Mr E. W. Humphreys, M.H.R. He received his education from tho Eev G. TVharton, vicar of Kinver, and followed the profession of architect and surveyor. He was for some years in the office of Messrs Haslam and Butler, architects, Cannon street, London. In January, 1863^ Mr Jones arrived at

Lyttelton with his brother, the late Mr T. D. Jones, in the ship Chariot of Fame. It may here be noted that his second brother was Mr John Humphreys Jones, of DaUton, London. The principal cause of his seeking a new land was the deßire to benefit hia health by a change of climate. For several years he was in the office of Mr F. Jenkins, buiider, and afterwards in that of Messrs W. Montgomery and Co. He, and Mr Jenkins and Mr Inneß, started a flax mill at Kaiapoi.on the sitenow occupied by the Woollen Company's Mills. The speculation, like others of the same kind, was a failure. Many years ago Mr Jones became a member of the Heathcote Road Board, of which he was at one time Chairman. In 1880 he was chosen to represent the Heathcote distrist on the then newly organised South Waimakariri Board of Conservators, now the South Waimakariri River Board. As a member' of thiß Board, of which he was for some time Chairman, Mr Jones did excellent service. His report on the Board'B work, the protection of Christchurch from the troublesome northern river, was one of the best contributions to the literature — if such it can bo called— of the subject. He retired from the Board in December, 1887, owing to the pressure of Parliamentary and other public duties. In 1831 he was elected to the Selwyn County Council as member for the Heathcote Riding, which he continued to represent till hia death. It is a mark of hia utility on the Council that he was a member of every one of its Committees. He took a principal part in originating the Halswell drainage scheme, and was largely instrumental in securing the Cashmere hills domain as a public domain. In December, 1883, he was chosen to represent the Seiwyn County Council oh the Board appointed to manage that domain, and held office as its Chairman till his death. On the institution of the Hospital and Charitable Aid Boards in 1885, he was chosen to represent the County Council on both Boards, and has done so to the present time. He was Chairman of the Charitable Aid Board in part of 1886 and 1887, and at the time of his death was Chairman of the Hospital Board. In January, 1882, he was choaon representative of Heathcote on the Drainage Board, but resigned in May of the same year, owing to a difference of opinion with his constituents. Mr Jones' Parliamentary career began in February, 1837, when he was elected M.U.R. for Heathcote on the death of Mr J. L. Coater. At,the general election, later in the year, he was again returned for the seat. As a member of Parliament he was »uccessful, though not a great talker.- His intimate acquaintance with local government matters made him a very useful man in the House, and he was scrupulously faithful to his election pledges. He took part, it will be remembered, in the agitation in favour of the West Coast railway. Mr Jones waa one of the principal members of the Industrial Association, and sat on the Committee for a considerable time. His fine taste in horticulture made him a valuable member of the Christchurch Horticultural Society, of which he was, for a time, Honorary Secretary and Treasurer, having'taken office on the death of Mr T. Greenaway. He took a keen interest in the fruit-growing industry, and strove to advance its welfare in many ways. He waa also a Director of the Lancaster Park Company. Readers of the above record will agree that there aTe few men in the Colony of whom such could have been written,fewwho have worked in so many capacities in the service of the community; and very general will be the feeling of regret that an active, useful life has closed. Mr Jones had been in failing health for several months. When sitting on the Sweating Commission, he was so unwell as to be hardly able to discharge his duties. He was attacked with La Grippe at the time of the prevalence of that epidemic, and later en an affection of the liver, with which he had long been troubled, became serious. Nevertheless he refused to lie up, and only took to his bed the day before his death. The Hospital Board, whose regular meeting is on Wednesday, will, it is stated, adjourn oub of respect to the memory of their Chairman. [Per Pbess Association.] WELLINGTON, Sept. 8. On meeting this afternoon the House of Representatives will adjourn till 7.30 p.m., out of respect for the memory of the late Mr F. Jones.

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https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/TS18900908.2.28.1

Bibliographic details

Frederic Jones, M.H.R., Star, Issue 6954, 8 September 1890

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1,180

Frederic Jones, M.H.R. Star, Issue 6954, 8 September 1890

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