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Heathcote.

The nomination of candidates for this seat took place outside the Heathcote Road Board office to-day at noon. A large number of electors were present when Mr W. T. C. Mills, the Returning Officer opened the proceedings in the usual manner.

Mr H. D. Davis had very great pleasure in proposing Mr Frederick Jones as a fit and proper person to represent their district in Parliament. Mr Jones was a man of worth and principle, and had filled many local offices with credit to himself and great benefit to the community. Mr Jones was elected as a supporter of the Stout- Vogel Government, who had done more for New Zealand than any other Ministry for many years. He asked them to return Mr Jones to represent them in the House of Eepresentatives. (Cheers.) Mr B. W. Muffett seconded the nomination of Mr Jones. _Mr J. S. P. Claeke nominated Mr J. H. Hopkins as a member of the House of Representatives. Those who vwre ' supporting Mr Hopkins had gr<sat respect personally for Mr Jones. He differed from

Mr Jones politically. They did not believe that the Stout- Vogel Government really meant retrenchment. Heasked the Government to practice what they preaohed, and .not to run about the country as the mem bera of the Government were doing at that time at the expense of the country. It had been stated that Mr Hopkins had been put forward by the Reform Association. (So he has). The Reformers were a drag on us. The; were no good, and Mr Hopkins was., the best man in the whole crowd, of them (laughter) and the only one who had the pluck to contest a. seat in or around Uhristchurch.

Mr Andrew Scott seconded the nomi nation of Mr Hopkins, whose plank was Retrenchment, and no further taxation. Mr Hopkins was on a sound platform in this matter. (Boo !) Mr Jones said that he did not intend keeping them long that day, because he intended to address them again before the polling day. He could not help recalling to mind the fact that only some seven months ago he Btood on that same platform as a candidate for their district. On that occasion, they would all remember, a large majority made up their mindt to return him. ("We will do it again/) They placed their confidence in him on that occasion. His platform was the same then as now, and he had not deviated from it by one iota. (Cheers..) He went to Wellington pledged to support economy, and to give a general support to the Government. At that time, they all remembered, he had no stronger supporter than Mr Hopkins. (Hear, hear.) Mr Hopkins at that time said such good things of him that he had no idea that he was entitled to so much as Mr Hopkins then informed him of. Since then Mr Hopkins had Been fit to change his opinions. That change took place very recently. It did not come about through his (Mr . Jonea') conduct in Parliament, because if it had done so Mr Hopkins would have acquainted him of it. Seeing the lightning changes of Mr Hopkins, he would not be surprised if Mr Hopkins that day week voted for him. (Great laughter.) He felt sure that the support which the electors gave him seven months before would not be withheld from him on this occasion. He ~ was in favour of bringing the expenditure within the income, and not to borrow any more money if it could possibly be avoided for' some years to come. In regard to the financial proposals of the Government, he had voted for these proposals going into Committee for discussion. The Opposition, by throwing them out, had forced on the elections, and had done very serious injury to the country at large. He concluded by thanking them for their support. (Loud cheers.) Mr Hopkins said that the direct tjjsue before the country was whether they" would consent to further taxation to the tune of over a quarter of a million of money — whether we pay our debts or not. That isauewas before the electors to-day. Mr Jones stood before them that day as a supporter of the Government.— (Hear, hear) — and that being the case he (Mr Jonea) endorsed the policy of the Government. There was no necessity for increased taxation. His flag was economy, and not taxation. No single individual inside or outside the district had supported him with their purse. He would give £50 to a charitable institution if anyone could prove it. (Eden George again.) He concluded by declaring himself a free and independent candidate. (Faint cheering.) The Returning Officer called for a show of hands for Mr Jones, when the great majority of those present' held up their hands, only a few in comparison voting for Mr Hopkins. The show of hands was declared to be in. favour of Mr Jones.

Three hearty cheers were then given for Mr Jones and the Stout- Vogel Government.

A poll was then demanded on behalf of Mr Hopkins. The poll will take place on the 26th inst., between the hours of 9 a.m. and 7 p.m.

A vote of thanks to the Returningofficer brought the proceedings to a close.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/TS18870919.2.28.1.4

Bibliographic details

Heathcote., Star, Issue 6036, 19 September 1887

Word Count
876

Heathcote. Star, Issue 6036, 19 September 1887

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