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Christchurch South.

The Oddfellows' Hall was crowded at noon to-day, when the nominations for the district of Cliristchurch South took place. Mr Alexander Lean, the Returning-Officer, presided, and as each candidate appeared on the platform he was greeted with applause by his friends and supporters. The Retuuning-Officeti formally opened the proceedings punctually at noon, and

asked every elector present to assist him m keeping order. Ho . in met} dulyqualified electors to propose candidate*. : Mr Hawlet proposed a candidate wheta lie thought deserving of. the honour, one whom he had known for over twenty-five years. If returned, the electors would; 'nave no cause to be ashamed of- htm, as he wou?d do his duty to the Colony and Canterbury. Be had great pleasure in nominating Mr Aaron Ayers. (Applause and disseatA Mr Wood Fcconded the nomination. (Applause.) Mr Aaron Ayers bad been tried during nine years, .and had.nevt-r been ton ndwan ting. ..";- ;. _•* ■_[ Mr W. A. JEWELS proposed Mr Eden <3eorge. Before- sitting down lie vroutd like to say a few words about the canvassing that had been going on. (DUaenf.) He had been asked to sign a requisition to Mr. Perceval, and had signed, .it, .and pledged himself to rote for tbar. gentleman; (" You would sign anything.") Ee' ; had/ net heard Mr George then, but since hearing him be had determined to support him. Mr TttGsiPEON seconded the" nomination. Mr J. G. Kxjddenklau, who was received with cries of "Grand, old man," &oiproposed Mr -Westby B. Perceval ,as a fit and proper person to represent Chrisb- ■ church South. Mr Perceval was a young man with no political sins to answer for. (Applause.) Hib action with regard to the West Coast Eailway showed him to be thoroughly staunch. (Applause.) As far as he (Mr Ruddeuklau) could see, Mr. Perceval was not only the best-look-ing candidate bufc the most eligible. (Laughter and applause.) He did not support Mr Perceval because he was a Government man; but because he was the best man to represent, the constituency.(Applause, and cries of "Cut it short.") What was wanted was an energetic and able man. (Applause.) Mr Danes, with great pleasure, seconded the nomination of Mr Perceval. (Applause.) Every one must recognise the necessity for having good men to represent the Colony, and make ifc what it ought, to be — the Britain of the South. By sending good men to Parliament, work would be found for willing hands. , Mr C. Cuff (who was received with loud disapprobation), proposed Mr Henry Thomson. (Here the noise became so great that the speaker waa quite inaudible.) Mr H. B. Lake seconded the nomination i in dumb show. ■

Mr Aykrs, who was received with loud cheers, stood up, but . The Returning-Offieer called for a show of hands. The result was an overwhelming majority for Mr W. B. Perceval. The announcement was received with longcontinued applause. .. ... Bar Ayebs, who was received with applaujt and hisses, addressed the meeting: . He believed he would be consulting the best interests of the electors by being as brief as possible. (Hear^) Suffice it to say that he placed his services at their dieposa, as their representative . (Boohoo) with the utmost confidence that he would receive their support. • He had been amongst them twenty, seven years, nine of which had bees spent in their service. (Interruption.) He had had to appeal to them again for re. newed confidence, and had received it." It public service meant anything, and hfl believed it did in the heart of every honest man he would have no fear at the opening of the ballot box. (Cheers and jeers) . Mr Eden Geobge, ,who was received witl applause and roars, eaid as he was suffering {from a very severe cold, be hoped the meeting would give him a hearing. H6 intended addressing the electors again, and therefore would not detain them'longei during the dinner-hour. His platform was Retrenchment, Protection, the completion of the West Coast Railway, a change it railway management, and a united Canterbury, &c. He hoped the electors would not let money win, but brains. He had been offered two bribes, to retire. (Ap* plause.) He did not know whether thej would have been carried out or wer« only a catch, but he would prove thai the last bribe had emanated from friends of Mr Perceval. (Applause and interruption.) He had not made a cowardly attack. Mr Perceval was ther^ and he hoped his friends would give thp,{j gentleman a hearing. (Interruption.) The Returning- Officer: For goodflteeft sake let us hear what the candidate has ia say. (Hear.) ' , ; Mr George : He liked to Eay the thing tc Mr Perceval's face. Mr Best had come ta him and offered him .£IOO if he would retire. (Applause.) Mr Best was one oj his (Mr George's) Committee men, but had been told— (interruption). If they gave him two minutes he would finish ("Ah, sit down!") Ho would produc« evidence, and back his word, that he had 6&id he would not take £1000. He had asked Mr Parry, who* brought the las! offer, to ascertain where it came from. Mr Parry had gone to. Mr Scott, and hence the rumour had been spread that he wanted a bribe, (Interruption). He wanted Mr Perceval to deposit .£2OO, and forfeit the money if it was proved tfcat the offer came from his (Mr Perceval's) side. (Applause). '. Mr Perceval, who w»b received with applause, followed by groans, and three cheers for someone, Baid he would keep the meeting very few minutes. He would first tell them all he knew of tha accusation made by Mr George. Neither he nor any member of his Committee-, with his consent had offered anything to Mr George. All he knew was that one of Mr George's Committee had been round, and asked if Mr, George's expenses would be paid if he retired. His (Mr Perceval's) Committee had refused tobave anything to do with it. (Applauee.). He thankedthem for their show of hands, and would not detain them longer than to say that his platform was economy, encouragement" of local industries, ', and the East and West Coast Railway. To succeed in these matters he would support the, Stout-Vogel Government. (Applause and groans.) Mr H. Thojisox, who was received with groans and applause, would not detain them a minute. (Interruption.) He was quite prepared to take the decision of the electors at the ballot box, but it did appear to him a little unmanly that they should, refuse him a hearing. . (Applause and interruption.) He would not detain them by any explanation, but trusted, that his platform— (The rest of the candidate's remarks were inaudible.) Mr Hawlet demanded a poll on behalf of Mr Ayers, who handed to tho Return-ing-Officer the requisite amount of JEIO. Mr Wood seconded this.

Mr George, Mr Perceval, and Mr Thomson respectively handed in their deposits. . -

The Retckning-Officeb. announced that the polling would take place on Monday. Sept. 26. . ;.'. Mr Peecevaj, moved, and Mr Ayers seconded, a vote of thanks to the Keturu-ing-Officer. . . -.

This was carried by acclamation, and closed the proceedings,' which had been, very noisy but good-humoured throughout.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/TS18870916.2.10.2

Bibliographic details

Christchurch South., Star, Issue 6034, 16 September 1887

Word Count
1,181

Christchurch South. Star, Issue 6034, 16 September 1887

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