Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
This article displays in one automatically-generated column. View the full page to see article in its original form.

TOPICS OF THE DAY.

(Prom tbe '"Star's » London Correspondent.) SOCIAL, THEATRICAL. AND LITERARY GOSSIP. London, April 20. OBITUARY— THE DOCK ESS OP NOKFOLK MB SIWDECATE. The death of thn Duchess oi Norfolk, who succumbed to a painful complaint on Easter Monday,, waa by no means unexpected. She had been in poor health for years •: in fact, never should have married tbe Duke, who ha 3 himself a poor physique. The match was strongly discountenanced both by . the Howard* and the Hastings, but the young couple were deeply in love, and took thi-ir own way. The- birth of the poor licfte deformed child, known as the Earl of Arundel and Surrey, proved a terrible shock to both. The Duchpss, indeed, never properly got over it. The Duke, always as much as monk as man, became more of a recluse than ever, giving up his life almost entirely to Mother Church. He is said to hi quite heart-broken over the Duchess' death. Mr Newdegate, who died last week, was for many years a cognate, and on the whole popular personage in Parliamentary circles. He might have taken a really good position but for one thing. He had "a bee in hie bonnet." Roman Catholics were his abhorrence, and in every movement he distrusted he smelltd a Jesuit plot. This craze grew to such a pitch latterly that it became almost mania. Por example, Mr Guildford Onslow secured Mr Newdegate's support for "Sir Roger simply through persuading this champion of Protestantism that the Claimant was the victim of Jesuit machinations. Mr Newdegate would always spend any amount of time or money to thwart a Catholic or an Atheist. It was as much his persistent J "whipping" as anything else tbat kept Bradlaugh out of the House co long, and . the news of that persistent person's J ultimate triumph nearly broke his heart, j MBB BHOWN. POTTER. MV THK HAYMARKET. The Prince of Wales has been twice to ! the Haymarket Theatre in the hope of j bolßtering-up Mrs Brown Potter and *' Man j and Wife." Nevertheless, the llritith ; public decline to follow suit. The play ! people pronounce it dull and the actress a , failure. j " THE REE» LAMP." i Mr Beerboh 111 -Tree's forthcoming managerial venture at the Comedy Theatre excites unusual interest, from the fact that "The Red Lamp" is said to be the first attempt at drama of a highly successful novelist. The scene is laid entirely in Russia, and we are promised an absolute reproduction of " high life" in St Petersburg. Lady Monckton acts the part of a Princess devoted to her husband and the Czar,. hut is curbed with a brother who is a* Nihilist. Good parts have also been found for Mr Brookfield, Mr Sugden, and Marion Terris. AT THE PRINCESS. " Held by the Enemy," the new American play at the Princess', has hit the popular taste, and will probably run till Mi6s Grace Hawthorne takes over the house for "Theodora," which Sardou has promised to superintend personally. A KEMPTON PARK BACING SURPRISE. One of those little surprises which make the turf such a pleasant brows'ng ground for bookmaker?, signalised the laat race at Kempton Park on Bank Holiday. There were only two starters, Mr Starkey's wellknown "sprinter" Modiste (ridden by George Barrett), and an untried privately trained three-year- old called Ripa, on whom a stable boy named Hobday had his first leg-up. The Ring asked backers of Modiste for odds varyiDg from 4 to 5 to 1, but so good a thing did it look for the mare that the price was freely laid. Mr Sfcarkey managed to get on about .£SOOO to £1000 altogether, and many of his friends also plunged rather wildly. Their feelings may be conceived when the outsider, after making all the running, won in a canter by a couple of lengths. Need I say the Ring yelled till they were hoarse. OTHER BPORTING ITEMS. At Manchester, on the same afternoon, the victorious career of Mr Craig's famous steeplechaser, The Sinner, was checked by Kilmeague, an Irish colt of Beasley'B. -. In this case, as at Kempton, there were only two starters, and long odds (20 to 1) were offered on the favourite. Owing, however, to the Beasleys not fancying Kilmeague, very little money changed hands. How unlucky Fullerton was to lose the Lincolnshire Handicap we learnt at Newmarket on Tuesday, when Sir George Chetwynd's horse walked home for the Crawfurd Plate more than twelve lengths in front of anything else. Mr Baird's Doubloon Btarted favourite, but could not get near Fullerton, who is clearly very smart at a mile. In the Three-year old Biennial, the famous "magpie" colours were seen out (for the first time since poor Archer's death) on Blanchland (by Maccaroon — Syringa). Lord Falmouth's colt met a fair field, » including Jack o' Lantern, Devilshoof, Simonne, Belisarius 11., and Roger the Monk, and won handsomely in Webb's hands. Blanchland is now backed for the Derby at 20 to 1. On Wednesday Fullerton gave us another taste of his quality by carrying lllb penalty successfully in the Babraham Plate (handicap) over the Rowley mile, beating Oberon (4ys, 7st lllb), Cambusmore, Valentine, and Antonnia. Oberon was favourite, and seemed to have the race in hand at the Bushes, but died away opposite the grand stand, leaving Fullerton to win rather easily by a length, Cambusmore third. ARCHER'S GHOST. A fearsome legend is current just now in the villages surrounding Newmarket Heath. Every night at twelve (so the story goes), the ghost of poor Fred Archer,' wearing the Manton scarlet (in,which he lost the Cambridgeshire) rides frantically across the Heath, mounted on a grey throughbred. Hundreds profess to have seen the spectre, and any scepticism on the point is very ill-received. THE BARON. The Derby favourite, The Baron (who, by the way, it may not be generally known in Australia, belongs to Mr Burdett-Coutts), won the Craven Stakes easily on Thursday afternoon, conceding Porter's Kingsclere crack, Carrasco, 101 b, and beating an otherwise f airish lot of seven. The ring fielded strongly, in the hope of a turn-up, bufcthe odds of 2 to 1 laid on Mr " Fern's " *colt were never in danger. The Baron is now freely backed for the big event at Epsom at 3 to 1. A NOTABLE HORSE. Lord Lyon, who won the Two Thousand Guineas, Oaks, and Leger of 1866, died at Croft Stud on Easter Monday. He was not a great success as a sire, the beßt of his numerous progeny being Minting, Placida, Touchet, Poursuivant,and Biserta. NEW NOVELS. The novels most asked for at the libraries just now are Black's "Sabina Zembra" and Edna Lyall's "Knight Errant." The latter, though not so good as "We Two," or "Donovan," well deserves to be widely read. The hero is a young Italian named Carlo Donato, who. in order to watch over a weak and frivolous sister's morals, gives up both a fortune and his lady love, and embraces the (to him) distasteful career of an opera singer. The common sense of the proceeding is rightly questioned by almost every personage in the book. One cannot, however, help admiring Donato's character, which Miss Lyall has drawn with true artistic touch. Coarse, cynical, repulsive, and yet in all particulars horribly true, is the verdict which most people will pass on I "Dr Phillips," a realistic study ofi middle-class life amongst the Jews, which haß created a big stir both in I Christian and Hebraic circles, and now sells like wildfire. The writer gives hiß name as Frank Danby, but unless that gentleman and Mr George Moore, of « Mummer's Wife " notoriety, prove to be identical presently, I shall be surprised. Dr Phillips i 3 a popular Jewish doctor, who, j nevertheless, rather despises Jews. He

plays upon their various little weaknesses, and amutes himself by introducing to hia wife and her set as a widow a girl who is really his mistress. Of this woman he eventually growß so fatuously fond that ho ! kills his wife with an ioj-ction of morphia I in order to marry her. The woman, unfortnnately, has never rtally cared for him, and when the miserable man is making the culminating sacrifice for her sake, positively hates bim. The story ends in a young and perfectly unblemished Christian gentleman marrying this female fiend and carrying her off in triumph. The doctor at first contemplates shooting himself, but thinks better of the resolve, and — according to the gentle author — finds consolation in the black eyes and in the caresses of a trim little parlour-maid.

This article text was automatically generated and may include errors. View the full page to see article in its original form.
Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/TS18870613.2.37

Bibliographic details

TOPICS OF THE DAY., Star, Issue 5953, 13 June 1887

Word Count
1,423

TOPICS OF THE DAY. Star, Issue 5953, 13 June 1887

Working