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The Heathcote Election.

THE NOMINATION. THIS DAY. The nomination of candidates for the Heathcote seat took place this morning in the Heathcote Road Board office, which was crowded. Mr W. T. C. Mills having formally opened the proceedings, Mr J. H. Hopkins had the great honour of proposing a gentleman Jwhose name had been before the district tor many years — Mr Frederic Jones. (Applause). 6a the various local Boards Mr Jones had done good service. (Hear.) He had not come forward without being solicited, but had consented to do so in order to complete the work he had begun in a lower Ephere. He was well entitled now to promotion. (Cheers). If returned, as there was no doubt ho would be, he would continue to hold the confidence he had previously gained. (Cheers.) In every public body he had been connected with Mr Jones had won the confidence, not only of his conBtituents but also of his colleagues, as a thorough and industrious worker. (Cheers.) I It had been stated that Mr Jones could not speak, but it was often a man's misfortune that he had too much speech. (Laughter and cheers.) Mr Jones was a man of worth and a man of principle who would make no rash promises. He understood what he took in hand and was sure to carry it to a successful issue. (" Shut up !" Should there ever be a history of the "Men of Mark of New Zealand," Mr Jones' name would be among them. (Applause.) J Mr H. P. Davis, as a representative of the working man, seconded the nomination, j Mr Jones would be a man to sympathise with the working man, and to do all he could for him. (Cheers.) Mr J. Douglas, after paying a tribute to the memory of the late member, Mr Coater, proposed Mr Aaron Ayers a candidate, who, he thought, would honourably and straightforwardly carry out his promises — CO promote and encourage native industries and support a land and income tax. (Applause.) Mr Ayers would, he (the speaker) hoped, aboli&h all revenue derived through the tariff. (Cheers, and dissent.) Great opposition to Mr Ayers had been raised by men like Mr Cooj>er and others. (Mr Cooper : " Honesty i 3 better than policy.") Mr Ayers had worked so well for the City of Christchurch that he had been re-elected Mayor. (Mr I Cooper : " I put him there.") Mr Ayers would be found a man of ability and justice. (Applause.) | Mr W. J. Walter, senior, seconded the j nomination. He had been in New Zealand over thirty years, and in Heathcote eighteen years. He knew both candidates, aud felt certain that Mr Ayers would do the district justice — (applauße) — for he was an honest man. He would leave it to the judgment of the electors and to the ballot-box to put in the best man. (Applause.) Mr Williams had not shaken hands or rubbed noses with anyone. Returning- Officer: "Who is your nominator ? " Mr Williams : " I shall have to nominate myself." Returning Officer : All right, sir, go on. (Confusion.) Gentlemen, let everyone have fair play. Mr Williams is «n elector, and has a perfect right to nominate himself. (Applause.) Mr Williams would nominate James Arthur Williams as a fit and proper person to represent Heathcote. He had been in the country ever since 1851. He waß a breeder of stock, for that pursuit was his hobby, and if he did as much good in Parliament as he had done by breeding stock, he would be a good man. He had never helped anyone to perpetrate a swindle, and he flattered himself that he rould uphold the respectability of the district. He intended to hold a meeting to-morrow night. He considered the principal matters that had been spoken of by the other candidates ' were Protection, the question of what was to be done with our boys, and the West Coast Railway. These were all rot. (Cheers and laughter.) Two West Coast Railways would not make the country prosper. Fostering industries by State aid rae&at taakiag the working men slaves. All these matters he looked upon as exploded errora. (Applause.) He respected the electors as men, and would meet them and state his views as well as he could. ! Mr J. A. Morgan, who was loudly called for, said he was not going to nominate himself, as he had not sufficient money to do it properly. He had done it once, and knew what it cost. If the ballot were to be ueed it should be the entire ballot. He 1 preferred open voting, but if he could not get that he would have the pure ballot. He apologised for not coming forward this time. Neither candidate had any political experience, and he hoped that the session would give it them. (Laughter.) No one seconded Mr Williams' nomination. Mr P. Jones, who was received with loud applause, said he offered himself, not on his own motion, but in consequence of the numerously aud urgently pressed request of the electors. These gentlemen had expressed the opinion that the experience he had gained on local boards would be of great service to the district were he in Parliament. He hod at his various meetings given his views on general and local matters. (Hear.) His desire was to work hand in hand with the electors in lifting the country into a better position. The signs of the times were most promising. The markets for our staple productions were improving ; the West Coast Railway was 6barted ; there was a teeming and abundant harvest being cut and housed. (Applause.) What was wanted was more mutual confidence, and confidence in the immediate future of this our adopted land. (Applause.) He trusted that there would be abundance of employment for every man able and willing to work. (Cheers, and " That's what we want.") Let all pull together, and they must succeed. He hoped in this 1 election all would get aloug amicably, and j when it was over that all would be as friendly together as ever. (Hear.) He j had made up his mind to have no personalities. (Hear.) He was a free and ! independent candidate for a free and j independent constituency. (Hear.) He was the nominee of the constituency, and believed he would be placed in the proud position of head of the poll. Mr Aters, who was loudly cheered, regretted that the meeting was confined within the narrow walls of the building. (Hear.) He agreed with what Mr Morgan had aaid as to the ballot. Now the system was neither the ballot nor ope.i voting. The ballot itself was secret, but people showed their hands. The very meeting now being held was a violation of the spirit of the ballot. (Hear.) The nominations should go in in writing, and people could then go to the poll unfettered, whether as voters or as candidates. (Hear.) He intended, if not now, on some future occasion, to be in Parliament, when he would endeavour to have everything opposed to the spirit of the ballot done away '

'with. (Applause.) Mr Jones had supported him on several occasions,' and he (Mr Ayere) would say nothing against that gentleman. Neither anonymous correspondence nor anything underhanded should emanate from him or any of his friends if he could prevent it. As Mr Jones h.ad paid, the candidates had expressed their views at meetings held throughout the district. He was known to all in the district, and his interests were identical with tho3e of the district. (Applause.) He had an interest centred not merely in himself, but in the rising generation, for his family would make Ne w Zealand their home. He did not say this in disparagement of his friend Mr Jones, who had no wife or family. His ambition would be to do all he could for his family, and the district. The West Coast Railway would be of immense advantage, though be admitted, as Mr Williams had said, that two j such railways would kill one another. He had advocated the Midland Railway and the promotion of Colonial industries. He would support consistently the present Government, which had done as well as any that had preceded it. It was a noble and able Government, and as long as it pursued the lines it now did must ensure the welfare of the Colony. So long as they did this he would support them. He felt that he could leave his case in the electors' hands. Let them record their votes as honest Englishmen, and whoever was returned he would carry out his premises. (Applause). He would have the honour of again addressing them before the day of election. He had never evaded any question. (Applause). Thanking the meeting for the attentive hearing they had given him, he challenged any one to Bay he had ever sought for, or consented to receive a vote of confidence. The right place for that was the ballot box, next Tuesday. (Applause). The Return ing- Officer called for a show of hands, and declared the result to be in favour of Mr Aaron Ayers. The announcement was received with enthusiastic cheers. Mr Aters moved, and Mr Jones seconded, a vote of thanks to the Return-ing-Officer. Mr Mills acknowledged the compliment, and closed the proceedings by declaring that the poll would be taken on Tuesday next, between the hours of 9 a.m. and 6 p.m. '

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/TS18870202.2.17

Bibliographic details

The Heathcote Election., Star, Issue 5841, 2 February 1887

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The Heathcote Election. Star, Issue 5841, 2 February 1887

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