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MAYORAL INSTALLATIONS, CHRISTCHURCH.

At noon yesterday, the City Council met, according to statute, for the purpose of installing the Mayor elect, Mr A. Ayers ; present — His Worship the Mayor (Mr Hulbert), Councillors Vincent, Manning, Tait, Grinsted, Gray, Crooks, Kiver, Louisson, and Bowman. A number of pasßcd Mayors and Councillors, with Mr Holmes, M.H.R., and some personal friends of the new Mayor, also were present. The Mayor called upon Mr Ayers to make the usual declaration. Mr Ayers made and signed the declaration, and was duly invested with the Mayoral chain. He then took the chair. Mr Hulbert addressed the new Mayor to the following effect : — In installing him in his office as Mayor of Christchurcn, he (Mr Hulbert) congratulated him and wished him a pleasant and profitable year of office — pleasant to himself and profitable to the ratepayers. From Mr Ayers' experience in municipal affairs, and with the assistance of the members and officers composing the Council, he (Mr Hulbero) felt sure of the result. To be placed in so high a position was, in his opinion, one of the greatest honours which a man's fellow citizens could pay him, but attached to the honour were considerable duties and responsibilities. To some extent the comfort and convenience of the citizens and the good name of the City were in the Mayor's hands during his time of office. The new Mayor would find that a large portion of his time and attention would be required to properly perform the duties of his office to the satisfaction of the ratepayers and i the Council. It would be impossible for | him to please all parties, but, speaking from his experience, he (Mr Hulbert) felt certain that if the Mayor's actions were in the interests of those he represented, he would be well supported, not only by the members of the Council, but also by the public and the Press. During the past few i years some improvements had been made 1 in the City, and necessary works had been 1 undertaken which would prove of ultimate j advantage to the ratepayers, as t-iey facilitated materially the more economical j carrying on of the business of the City, ' but a good deal yet remained to be done if i it was sought to make Christchurch a ! desirable place of residence. Much of ; this he (Mr Hulbert) believed could be j done without increasing the City's liabili- ; ties or raising the rates. He would not i occupy the time of the Council by entering into particulars, but would conclude as he ' 1 had commenced, by sincerely wishing His ] Worship a pleasant and profitable year of office. (Applause.). His Worship, addressing the retiring Mayor and the others present, said he would take leave to thank Mr Hulbert very heartily for the very kind manner in '. 1 which he had spoken. He was quite sure ■ that he would have such a support from ' his Council as justified him in entering upon his duties with pleasure. From his > experience of the Council he know that the ■ Mayor always received that support and ' help which made the work light compared i with what it would be with an inferior ; Council. He entered upon the duties of ■ his office with some diffidence, however, 1 for he knew something of its difficulties, I having been in the Council, as they knew, for some years. He felt that he was not ■ competent to fulfil the duties so ably as some of his predecessors had, but he could promise that, to the best of his ability, '< that portion of his time which he could , possibly spare should be devoted to the service of the citizens. Though he might not be able to carry on so progressive a ■ policy as Mr Hulbert had done he hoped that, with the assistance of the Council, and tho meins at his disposal, as much [ work as possible would be done. As they • all knew, no one could do much without money. But he did not expect that during ' the ensuing year the Council would have as much money to spend as it had had in the past year or two. However, he was not hopeless in the matter, for he was disposed to think that the country at large, as well as what was the leading city of the country, was going to inaugurate a progressive policy. (Hear.)

He felt sure that Christchurch waa not going to be left behind, for he held that she was the leading city of the Colony, and was prepared to take up her true position in the race of progress. (Applause.) With the support of the Council, he would not be backward in inaugurating any new work that the City might be able to undertake. He would not take up any more of the time of those who were anxious to get away. He would only say that he hoped to be able, at some future meeting, to lay before the Council a programme, which, of course, would depend upon the amount of money the citizens would place at their disposal. ' He thanked them for the manner in which they had welcomed him, and had only to announce that the retiring Mayor had added his link to the chain. This was all I the business of the meeting, and he had now to declare the Council adjourned to the next ordinary meeting night. At the invitation of his Worship, those present then partook of a champagne lunch, during which a few toasts were proposed and heartily responded to.

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https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/TS18851217.2.26.4

Bibliographic details

MAYORAL INSTALLATIONS, CHRISTCHURCH., Star, Issue 5494, 17 December 1885

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MAYORAL INSTALLATIONS, CHRISTCHURCH. Star, Issue 5494, 17 December 1885

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