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THE BANQUET TO SIR JULIUS VOGEL.

I New Zealand Defences. The West Coast Railway. '■'• Village Settlements. Last night, at the Queen's Theatre, Tuam street, the Hon Sir Julius Yogel, K.C.M.G., Colonial Treasurer and M.H.R. for Christchurch North, wa3 entertained at a public banquet by his "Worship the Mayor and the citizens of Christchurch. The Hall wa3 beautifully adorned, a large number of very fine ferns, collected and grown by Mr Mudd, being brought into requisition for the occasion, and the scenery on the stage also was so disposed as to add to the general effect. A capital band, provided by Mr Fleming, occupied the stage, and contributed in no small degree to the general enjoyment. A novel feature of the evening was the attendance of ladies, who filled all the available space in tho gallery, the centre of the front row • being occupied by the Mayoress, Mrs Hulbert, who had on her right hand Lady Yogel. The catering was dono by Mr W. H. Messenger, in his usual style. The number of gentlemen present on the floor of the hall could not have been less than 300, but the tables were so disposed that no difficulty was experienced by the waiters in supplying all their requirements. During the evening, refreshments wore supplied to the ladies. His Worship the Mayor presided, supported on his right by tho guest of the evening, Sir Julius Yogel, Messrs L. Harder, F. J. Garrick (M.H.R.'s), H. P. Murray- Aynsley; Mr R. Beetham (R.M.), Lieut.-Colonel Lean, Mr J. T. Matson, and Messrs Walker and Lance (M.H.I-.'s) ; and on his left by His Honor Mr Justice Johnston, the Hon J. T. Peacock, the Hon W. Reeveß, and Colonel Brett (M.L.C.'s), Mr J. Holmes (M.H.R,), and Mr John Ollivier. Ihe Chairman proposed tho toasts of. "Tho Queen," "The Prince of Wales and the Royal Family." Mr A. C. Wilson proposed "The Army> Navy and Volunteers," responded to by Colonel Brett and Major Lean. Mr T. I. Joynt proposed "His Excellency's Advisers," briefly responded to by Sir Julius Yogel. Mr C. W. Turner proposed " The Parliament of New Zealand," responded to by the Hon J. T. Peacock and Mr John Holmes, the member for Christchurch South. The latter gentleman was enthusiastically received. THE TOAST OF THE EVENING. The Chairman, before proposing the toast of the evening, stated that apologies had been received from His Excellency the * Governor and suite, from members of the i Ministry, from members of both Houses of Parliament, and from numerous private citizens who, in the majority of instances, expressed their high appreciation of the object for which the banquet had been arranged. .. His Worship continued : — Your Honor and Ladies and Gentlemen, — The primary object of this gathering tonight is to endeavour to do honour to a gentleman who, for the past 20 years (except for a brief interval) has occupied a foremost position in the public affairs of thi3 country. It-cis unnecessary to say I allude to our guest, Sir Julius Yogel. Doubtless a majority of those present here are old Colonißts, and, therefore, well aware of the length and value of the services rendered to New Zealand by the Hon the Colonial Treasurer. But I believe lam correct in stating that a very large number of the present inhabitants of this Colony possess but a limited knowledge of the numerous public offices held, the great abilities displayed, and the personal sacrifices made, by Sir Julius Yogel for the welfare and prosperity of this country. It is not my intention to weary you with the details of this, but I think you will • agree with me that tho occasion justifies my stating a few facts for the consideration of those who are not so well informed on the subject as yourselves, but before doing so I should like to say that, in my opinion, it would be unbecoming in me, and distasteful to the honorable gentleman himself, that. I should attempt anything in the shape of flattery or praise in my remarks. It is now some two or three-and-twenty years ago that our guest came to Dunedin, and occupied the position of editor of one of the principal newspapers in that city, in which his abilities and knowledge of public affairs were soon recognised by his fellow citizens, who elected him as a member of the Provincial Council of Otago, and, some time after, as a member of the Executive Government ; and, I believe, the residents of that portion of the Colony are indebted to the honorable gentleman for many useful and progressive measures which assisted in making Otago ono of the first, if not tbe most important Province in New Zealand. At all events, his efforts j were so much appreciated that he was elected to a seat in the House of Representatives, and, in 1869, joined the Fox Ministry, and in 1870 introduced his famous Public Works policy, which, after great opposition, was adopted by Parliament. Ladies and gentlemen, there are certainly differences of opinion j even in this day as to the wisdom and j results of that policy ; but I believe I am • justified in saying that, in spite of our in- \ debtedhess, in spite of the depression \ which exists in Canterbury and other parts of the country — that, taking the Colony as a whole, it is in a more prosperous and j healthy condition than it wasfor some years ' previous to the introduction of the Public Works policy ; and further, it ia the opinion '• of many that if the fundamental principle of that policy had been adhered to, viz., that the enhanced value given to the lands of the country by the introduction of population, and the expenditure of large sums of money, should be reaped by the Colony instead of by private individuals, our indebtedness would have been less, and the Colony more prosperous, than it is at present. Before leaving this subject, and not in the least desiring to take any ciedit from the honorable gentleman, which he deserves, but I believe years ago he was pleased to admit that in the materials for that great scheme he was somewhat indebted to his dear friend, and the friend of Canterbury, the late William Sefton Moorhouse. In 1879 we find the hon gentleman acting as Agent-General for the Colony in London ; and it must be in the recollection of most of y«u how ably he served and defended New Zealand in that capacity. And now, ladies and gentlemen, just a few words on what I may, without irreverence, term the' second advent of Sir Julius Yogel, and I have done. It is only a short time back that this part of the country, at any rate, appeared to be drifting into a chronic state of depression, if not absolute despair, and it was thought by many that we needed a strong public man, with progressive views, who was free of the party cliques and combinations which provent the public interest being truly served. There was the opportunity, and, in the opinion of a great many, the man also, in the person of our guest, Sir Julius Yogel, and, gentlemen, what would have been our condition, if he had refused or been prevented from serving the country at this juncture. I think the fate of the first Ministry, which was formed on the fall of the late Government, and which contained, with one exception, all the leaders of the Opposition, is an answer to that. We should simply have been handed back to our old rulers, and in that case, taking the past as our guide, do you think the East and West Coast Railway Bill would have become law, and our delegates in London with every prospcet of successfully negotiating the construction of the line ? Do you believe I the various Harbour Bills, of which great results ar-v anticipated, would have been ■ introduced and passed, and the works actually in progress? ,Would the North Island line have been in its present forward state ? And now, without in the least wishing to detract from his colleagues or hi 3 followers in the House, I think we may fairly say that our guest did his share in bringing about those results. Ladies and gentlemen, I will conclude by asking you to assist me in drinking the health of our guest, Sir Julius Yogel

r >_ — _ »j lmc-t-wkb e-. — wu- iiiiiu ■noaa— — mini 11 iron I His Worship was frequently loudly ap plauded during his speech. Before Sir Julius replied, the Chairman added that he had a very pleasant duty to perform at the request of Sir Julius Vogel's Committee, on behalf of his constituents, and this was to present him with the proof that they had paid the whole of the expenses connected with his late election. (The presentation consisted of a neatlyframed number of photographs of the principal buildings of Christchurch, surrounding a document showing the amount paid.) SIR JULIUS VOGEL'S SPEECH. Sir Julius Yogel then addressed the assembly for more than an hour and a quarter to the following effect :— He was at a loss tb express, in terms that would sufficiently do justice to his feelings, his grateful sense of the magnificent way in which he had been entertained, of the kindness with which the Mayor had proposed his health, and of the enthusiastic way in which the toast had been received. Above all, he was at a loss how to thank the people of Christchurch for their kind actions towards him since he had been in the Colony. (Applause.) It was much more easy to persons accustomed to Parliamentary warfare to speak when they were attacked and had something to defend than when they felt assured that they were addressing an audience entirely disposed to be kindly. All he could say was that the best evidence he could give of his grateful sense of the kindness he had received at the hands of the people of Christchurch would be the placing at their disposal, as much as possible, such poor services as he could render them. (Applause.) To public men occasions like the present were the blue ribands Of public life. As a rule, public men had, perhaps, larger responsibilities and more unpleasantness to bear than was generally supposed, and this remark he meant to apply to all who occupied positions, whether in the Government, in Parliament, or m local governing bodies. He was sure that they would agree witb him that it' would be well, on an occasion like that, he should introduce into his speech as little as possible of controversial matters. It would be idle for him, however, to refrain altogether from them, but he desired to avoid all party and even all personal questions, and he trusted that he would say nothing which would wound the feelings of any. (Applause.) He thought it right here to say that he would probably on that day week, if possible, ask his constituents to do him the honour of meeting him at a public meeting, so that he might express his opinions more fully and completely than he could then (applause), because after the kind waj^ those present had received him they would not be disposed to take the ordinary privileges of constituencies of not only praising their representative, but also subjecting him to more or less harsh treatment. (Cheers and laughter.) It was now quite a year since he arrived in New Zealand on this, which the Mayor had happily called, his second advent. At that time he had no intention of going into public life. He had some business to transact in this Colony, and nothing was further from his thoughts than any idea of entering public life ; but he was bound to say that he felt bo keenly the sad position into which the Colony had drifted, not only from the absolute loss and reduction' in business, but from the diminished hope and energy as shown by those with whom he came into contact and throughout the Colony, that he could not resist the inclination, crippled as he was, to try if he had remaining any of the old power, as certainly there remained the old •wisli, to be of use to the Colony. (Applause.) Of the many offers which he received from various part 3of the Colony, he without hesitation gave his choice to the warm and cordial offers which he received from Christchurch. (Applause.) He had done so, feeling that whatever use he might be able to be in public affairs would be very much increased by the warm support ho anticipated — and he might say his anticipations had been fully realised — on the part of those who had committed themselves to him when they asked him to be their representative — (applause) — and he would say that there could not be a question that such influence as he possessed, or might yet possess, would be found to be materially increased and strengthened by the warm support and excellent advice which ho had received during the last session from his friends within the City of Christchurch and the Provincial District of Canterbury. (Applause.) More hearty and judicious support could not possibly have been accorded to him. He was not going to discuss the circumstances under which he had joined the Government, because he thought the particulars relating thereto were more fitted to come before the larger body of his constituents whom, as he had said, he proposed to address next week. The same remark applied to tho history of last session, if, indeed, it was worth while entering into minute details thereof when the matters relating to the last session were co thrown into the shade by the question of greater interest — what is to ceme during the next session . (Applause.) He might, perhaps, be allowed to say that he had, so to speak, to parcel himself out. He felt like a person who had committed himself to give a series of public entertainments. It did not do to repeat on every occasion the same address, and as he was to address different meetings he would divide his subjects so as to avoid repetitions. DEFENCE OF THE COLONY There was one subject occupying the minds of the people, not only of New Zealand, but of the other Colonies also, the subject which had been so eloquently treated by his old and valued friend, the Hon Colonel Brett ; and reference to which he could not well omit. Not only was it a burning quesl tion with the Colonies generally whether i it would be desirable to aid in the camj paign ie the Soudan, but there was another j subject touching our hearths and homes, i and that was, what was to be done in order to place in a fairly efficient condition : of defence the Colony, which was, so to say, committed to our guidance. (Applause.) i Were we, as in times past, to say, '* We j will run the chance, not only of the matej rial loss which might be occasioned to us ! by the visit of a hostile privateer, but of . that loss which would leave an impression . enduring much longer than any material loss, from the shock it would give to our contemporaries and our successors — that a powerful English Colony could not do her fair share towards resisting the enemies of hec country, and should lie at the mercy of any small privateer that chose to come to her. (Applause.) As to the campaign in the Soudan, he would be very sorry if anything he said should appear to reflect upon the patriotic action taken by a neighbouring Colony, but he thought that they would agree with him that the circumstances of New South Wah?s and New Zealand were very different. What gave the charm to the action of New South Wales was not the money or the men sent, but the fact that that Colony stood forward as the type of the British Colonies to say to the world that when assistance was wanted by the Empire it would not be denied. (Applause.) But he thought we might ask ourselves whether it would not be indulging in a vain-glorious feeling for us to send men away to defend other parts' of the Empire at a time when we could not but feel conscious that we had not sufficiently fulfilled our own obligations in defending the Colony entrusted to us. (Applause.) The Government did not think that a question of this kind should be decided without Parliament being consulted, and he might say that there was nothing Government might do which would preclude Parliament from taking such steps as it might think desirable. This he would say, that if it should be thought desirable to send a body of men to the Soudan, we could muster such a body as would be a credit to the Colony, and which would do as good service as any aimiiar body from any other part of the Empire. (Applause.) But would it not be a mistake to deprive ourselves of men whom we wanted for the sake of earning perhaps some eclat while leaving our positions at home undefended ? And after all, when we spent money on the defence of this Colony, were we not spending it really on behalf of tho Mother Country '( If a privateer were to come and iaiiict injury here, would it net be felt

from one end of the Empire to the other ? (Applause.) And if, on the ot_er hand, we could give a good account, as ho believed we could, of any privateer coming hore, would not this be felt to reflect credit on the whole of our countrymen ? (Applause.) For his part, he looked upon these Colonieß as supports of the Empire, and believed that we ahould do greater service to our futuro Sovereigns by training up a body of men whose peaceful instincts would carry on the heroic work of colonisation, but who, when required, would be able to help the Empire at any threatened point. (Applause.) He thought the first step must be in the direction of the defence of the Colony, and he hoped to be able to say that Government would propose a definite scheme by which, within a reasonably short period, we should put into a condition of defence the four principal harbours of the Colony — Lyttelton, Port Chalmers, Wellington and Auckland. (Applause.) But it was not enough to say that the Government intended to make these proposals. We lived in stirring times, and it might bo that there was more or less of an emergency. At any rate the ; Government felt that no time should be lost in patting n position the guns already ; possessed by the Colony, and in doing what could be done in carrying out a proper > system of defence,- which they were sure I the Parliament would sanction. And here he might point out that it was a singularly fortunate thing that they had in his Excel- j lency the Governor a gentleman who had ■ obtained a celebrity, he might say as a ■ specialist, in regard to matters connected • with defence. He need not say that his j Excellency was willing to place at the • service of the Colony the knowledge and ! experience which he possessed. (Applause.) ! He might here express his own opinion j that, whilst he would not in the slightest . degree derogate from the patriotism of j New South Wales, he could not help feel ing ; that, apart from the desire to avenge that ' great and good man, General Gordon, the war in the Soudan was not of a nature which was likely to create the utmost sympathy in all parts of the empire. However, he felt, further, that should this war assume a serious complexion, the people of New Zealand might well consider that it was not right that their brethren at Home should be afflicted by the tax-gatherer in consequence. They might naturally feel that it would be worthy the consideration of Parliament whether the Colony shouldnot proffer — not men, whom it could not spare, but money or produce to help in their privations the soldiers suffering in the barren desert. (Applause.) He thought he had dwelt sufficiently long upon this question, and that his hearers must now well understand that the Government proposed to introduce an explicit proposal to carry out an efficient system of defence, and that they also intended to do all they reasonably could before Parliament met. And now he came to a subject in which he was sure they were all interested, judging . from the enthusiasm displayed when it had been already alluded to in the course of the evening. And this was the EAST AND WEST COAST RAILWAY. (Applause.) It wa3 not new to the greater part of them that he was a great and ardent believer in it. He had committed himself to it when he stood before them, and 'had told them fairly that, in his opinion, we should first seek to have it done by-fyrivate enterprise, and if it could not be done in that way, ,it was a work that ought to be done by the Colony. (Applause.) He might say that the more he thought of it the more convinced he was of.the justice of the view he had taken. And this view was taken by his colleagues, two of whom — Messrs Stout and Larnach — had just been on a visit to the West Coast, and, he was happy to say, had become as enthusiastic as himself. He thought he might embody their opinion in half-a-dozen worda by saying they had come back with the idea that it would be sinful to neglect the development of the West Coast. (Applause.) And they would allow him, perhaps, to say, as he had referred to the name of the latest member of the Ministry, tho Hon the Minister of Mines, that he (Sir Julius) thought it was of the utmost importance to the Colony that mining should be duly encouraged. In selecting Mr Larnach to take the position of Minister of Mines, the Government had selected one who would have a nice discrimination as to the limits within which assistance ahould be given to this important industry. He was quite.r'fiure the Government would not only have performed a duty to the Colony, but also done a benefit to the whole world if they could succeed in bringing to light the vast deposits of gold which lie believed still to exist in the Colony. A large amount of the distress existing in the world was due to the depieciation and waste of the universal legal tender. The discovery of additional gold mines here would have a beneficial effect. They had only to see the assistance which Victoria gave in the shape of diamond drills. One of the principal causes of the change in circumstances that Victoria. was now enjoyin j, was due to the encouragement given by the Government to mining industries. Victoria was now one of the most prosperous of the Colonies — from having been a few years ago one of the most depressed. A considerable portion of her prosperity was due to the fact that the Colony had a Government which seemed to .understand her wants. He did not agree with those who alleged that the prospects of a Colony were not affected by the prudence of those who conducted its Government. (Applause.) Now, he did not think that it was necessary for him to point out the fact that when this railway to the West Coast was, he would not say finished, but in course of construction, it would bring vast trade to Christchurch,, and would awaken a vast amount of productive enterprise, which would do good not only to Christchurch,) but to the whole of that strip of the Island which was known as the East Coast. The people here would have an opportunity of exchanging their products for those of the West Coast. The timber trade alone would be enormous, and he did not think it would be easy to magnify the extent it would reach when the railways were in progress and the harbours of the West Coast were made equal to the accommodation of large steamers and ships. He had recently been on a visit to Auckland, and when he saw the gigantic proportions which the timber trade had reached there, and its effect on the whole district,he thought that he could not exaggerate the effects that would follow when they were able to export not only red pine, which he believed would be found, merchantable, not only in the Colonies, but elsewhere, but also the black birch, which he believed would be found one of the most valuable trees of the country. And now as to the question of what were the probabilities of this railway being carried out by a company in England. Ho thought they were fairly good; and it would be interesting to them to know that on Wednesday he had telegraphed to the Agent-General to know what the delegates were doing, and he had that afternoon received a reply which he thought they would think satisfactory : " Delegates working discreetly and safely. Tentative steps neoessary at present. Please inform Canterbury and Nelson." Now, he thought that telegram was very satisfactory. (Applause.) It showed first of all that they were working harmoniously with, and to a certain extent, it might be supposed, with the aid of, the Agent-General ; and secondly, it showed that they had a knowledge of what they were doing, and that they were not idle. He was convinced himself that it would be best if carried out by private enterprise, but at the same time he was of opinion that, if it was not, it was a railway that the Colony would have to undertake to construct itself. (Applause.) ! He would like to refer to another question which was of great interest to the Colony. He had heard it said that an endeavour would be made to get up an opposition between town and country on the subject of LOCAL GOVERNMENT. He hoped no such idea was entertained, for a greater fallacy than to suppose an antagonism between the interests of town and country could not be found, for the prosperity of the whole of the country depended upon the prosperity of every part. At Auckland, when addressing a

meeting, he had thrown out the idea; trifitt the Government would consult the Chairmen of County Councils and the Mayors of Municipalities ; but this idea had beea abandoned, as the Government had made up their minds as to what they would submit to Parliament. The scheme would I provide for only . two local bodies— the j Municipalities and the County Councils — \ having to be dealt with. Obviously ' it must be so arranged as to give the i subdivisions of the Counties power and j control over funds. Whilst agreeing to this it was the opinion of the Government that the local bodies should have separate and reliable functions, and not have. to come up to the Assembly as suppliants— he would not use the word " beggars " — asking for this road and that bridge. They wanted to foster a spirit of self-reliance in the local districts, and this could only be done by placing them in possession of ' means for their own wants. The main objects of local government were the effecting of local improvements in the shape of roads and bridges, and attending to sanitary objects. The last term had, a very wide range of meaning, and included attention to the dwellings of the labouring classes, the progress of settlement on the land, and that suggestion in the report of the Unemployed Commission — THE FORMATION OF VILLAGE SETTLEMENTS. The Government was deeply impressed with the necessity of planting the j working population on the land, from ! which they might add to their incomes by gardening and bee farming. They considered that such settlement in the neighbourhood of large towns would prevent a recurrence of the unemployed difficulty. They were not blind to the fact also that it was necessary for colonists to use their own productions as much as possible, and to buy less from the foreign market. He was glad to be able to '■ say that his colleague, Mr Ballance, who j was alfcenthusiast on the subject of village settlements, would be down here in two or ! three weeks' time, and would be able to j arrange with the local authorities for a fair I trial being given to the system. He denied that there was any possibility of a return to the Provincial system, which was absolutely dead, but the Government thought that one feature Df it might, in some sort, be revived; that feature was the delegation of certain powers to the local bodies, in some instances, though the principle would not apply to all. They thought that the police, which, for the sake of economy, had a central organisation, might be more under the control of the local bodies. To sum up, he would Bay that the principles were, first, to make as little of a sudden wrench in changing as possible ; next, to do whatever was done in harmony with the feelings of the local bodies themselves, and, lastly, to so arrange that whatever was done might be of an elastic nature, so Hhat it should not follow that what was suitable for one part of the Colony should be arbitrarily applied to another. Before leaving the Bubject of local government he would refer to a remark which had fallen from the Mayor, which exactly expressed his own sentiments. He referred to his indebtedness to the late William Sefton Moorh»use. (Applause.) The proposals of the Government in 1869, extensive though they were, were small compared with the heroic proposals, made to, a mere handful of people, to construct the Lj-ttelton tunnel. (Applause.) DIRECT STEAM. While referring to questions particularly germane to this Province, it would be wrong for him to refrain from alluding to the New Zealand Shipping Company, of whioh Canterbury Bhould be proud, for to that Company was due the credit of being the pioneer of direct steam communication with the Mother Country. (Applause.) He would be sorry to undervalue the services of the other Company — the Shaw, Savill and Albion, and he deeply regretted the loss of a very valued friend, the late Mr Galbraith, one of their Directors. The benefits of direct steam communication with England, both practical and sentimental, were immense, and the New Zealand Shipping Company deserved credit for having effected that unaided by any Government subsidy. MANAGEMENT OF THE RAILWAYS. Regarding tlie management of the railways, the public of Christchurch had that day seen a sight which they would hardly have seen but for the StoutYogel Government. He alluded to the large number of visitors from Timaru. The cheap excursion trains were part of the new policy introduced by his colleague, Mr Richardson, not without a great deal of anxiety, and he might add, of opposition. Thoy were the beginning of a new era ,• of railway management. (Applause.) The opinion of the Government was this, that it was better that six persons should contribute to the railways in smaller contributions than they should have to depend upon one person - r and this applied not only to passengers, but also to freight. Accordingly, they had made what reductions they could in the grain rates. He thought, however, that, no matter how good the Minister was, the railways would never be managed in the best way till they were controlled by non-political Boards. (Applause.) In order to prevent the scrambling which had occurred in the past, he thought that it should be clearly laid down !as soon as possible what were to be [ the trunk lines, not necessarily that they might be constructed immediately, however. Districts requiring railways should guarantee the annual amount of interest on the cost. He would like to say a few words on the question of finance. The brilliant success of the last million loan, which, by the way, it had been said, would be a failure on account of the abolition of the sinking fund, had been a complete vindication, of the policy of the Government. (Applanse.) He trusted that the depression spoken of in Canterbury and Otago would soon pass away. It was not general throughout the Colony, and he would put it to the common sense of his hearers whether it would continue to rage in a small part of the Colony when it was not prevailing in the rest of it. (Applause.) Laws applying to politicalas to physicalmatters wore, he would remind them, subject to modification. The very law that moulds a tear, And bids it trickle from its source, That law preserves the earth n sphere, Ar.d guides the planets iv their course. They might not alter the general laws, but these were capable of so wide a range of application that what might be beneficial to some would be harmful to others, yet the eternal truth of those laws could not be denied. It was for them to consider how to apply these general Laws, and, if successful, the Governmert would fairly earn for themselves the best reward, in the knowledge that they had benefited the country over which they ruled. In conclusion, he must say that the memory of that evening waß one of the most delightful recollections, •which he would carry with him to the grave, aud he would fain hope that hewould live in thoir memories. When he thought of the hospitable way in which he had been treated, he could not help asking to be allowed to quote those lines of Moore — Ami still on that eveniu-y when pleasure fills up To the "highest top, sparkle each heart and each, cup; "Where'er my path Hea, be it -arloomy or bright, My soul, happy friends, will be with you that night ; Will join in your revels, your sport and your wiles And return to me teeming all o'er wita your Bnrilos, Too blest if it tell me that, 'midst the j*ny ohoer, Some kind voice will whisper, "I wis_ flu? were here." Before ho concluded, he hoped t_,ey would allow him to propose a toast, which he was sure they would receive with enthusiasm, the health of his Worship the Mayor of Christ-church. (Loud and prolonged applause.) The toast was drunk mosc heartily. The Chairman then thanked them vory much on behalf of tfc,e citizens and tba City Council of Christchurch. The Council, , he was sure, was doing its best fo«- the | good of the citizens, especially i"a the matter -rf sanitary improvement. There j were some {legislative difficulties the j Council laboured under, for the- reason that (what law suited one part ot the Colony did not suit another. Soiue of the provisions ' of the Tolice Qff p liee-* Act. wore espcc:;Uly

frith reference to th-? «Qocation of rfinee, did not apply well to> municipalities. (Cheers.) The remaining toasts were " Tbe Ladies," proposed by Mr John Ollivier, and moat happily responded to Mr Loughrey. " The Bench and the Bar," proposed by Dr Frankish and responded to by His Honor Mr Justice Johnston and Mr F. J. Garrick. " The Agricultural, Pastoral and Commercial Interests," proposed by Mr J. T. Matson and responded to by Messrs T. Bruce, J. Cooke (President of the Chamber of Commerce), Scott (President of the Industrial Association) and A. G. Howland. " The Press," responded to by Mr E. A. Loughnan, and— in the absence of Mr Guthrie— Mr Briggs. "The Chairman," proposed by Mr Murray- Aynsley ; " Lady Yogel," proposed by Mr J. T. Matson, and "The Visitors," proposed by the Chairman.

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THE BANQUET TO SIR JULIUS VOGEL., Star, Issue 5258, 13 March 1885

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THE BANQUET TO SIR JULIUS VOGEL. Star, Issue 5258, 13 March 1885

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