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The Star. MONDAY, OCTOBER 13, 1884.

j We were not able to find space, in our j issue of Friday, for any full report of tU* ; presentation of a requisition to His Worship the Mayor, and Mr Hulbert's reply thereto. We briefly mentioned the fact tt>at Mr Hulbert had been requested by a large number of influential citizens to. offer himself for re-election, and that oltimately he had consented to do so. Perhaps th» 1 primary inducement in, making such a

request was the existence of a rumouir that Mr Hulbert did not intend to again offer his services. The fact is, the Mayor has found that any adequate discharge of the official duti necessitates much personal sacrifice. An immense amount of time has to be directlygiven to the work, and indirectly the Mayor is assumed to be always at the disposal of the public. And if it be objected that during the past year there have been no burning civic questions, and no special occasions for a display of civic hospitality, it must, on the other hand, be conceded that the aggregation of routine dutieß has been enormous, and that many of these duties have demanded no slight degree of judicial skill. It must not be forgotten that during the year we have passed through the excitement of a general election — through a political campaign in the course of which the Mayor has been called upon to preside over large and sometimes stormy meetings. Nor must that agitation wave, crested with the foaming of the " unemployed," be overlooked. This question alone has involved much patient enquiry, much action, and, no doubt, many a display of unthankfulness, if not open abuse. How has the Mayor acquitted himself ? When he was about to assume office, the community was not all friendly. His line of conduct has been closely watched by two classes— those who hoped -and believed he would acquit himself with credit, as we did ; and those who anticipated (possibly wished for) errors of judgment, exhibitions of hasty temper, or some other of the little blemishes which in a public man become big, black blots. But, during the whole of Mr Hulbert's term of office there has been no reason for adverse criticism, nothing out of which carping objectors or detractors could make capital. This is saying & great deal in the Mayor's favour, seeing that friction is infinitely more likely to occur in the multiplicity of routine duties, than in the discussion of the larger civic questions which sometimes arise. The deputation told Mr Hulbert that he had done well ; that he had acquitted himt^lf zealously and straightforwardly; that he had laboured untiringly in the interests of the citizens, and that a majority of the citizens would be pleased to see him re-elected. TVe cordially endorse the utterances of the deputation; and we should very much like to see the perfect compliment paid to Mr Hulbert of an. unopposed return.

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https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/TS18841013.2.9

Bibliographic details

The Star. MONDAY, OCTOBER 13, 1884., Star, Issue 5131, 13 October 1884

Word Count
490

The Star. MONDAY, OCTOBER 13, 1884. Star, Issue 5131, 13 October 1884

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