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Local & General.

♦ Mr J. L.Wilson has been elected without opposition to fill the vacant seat upon the Waimakariri Harbour Board, caused by the resignation of Mr E. Moore. On Friday night last Constable Ryan succeeded in arresting the two absconders from Burnham, named Giles and Rayner, at Little Eiver. They were forwarded in charge of Constable Simpson to Christchurch by train on Saturday. Laat evening Mr B. Cass delivered a lectuire in the Baptist school, Oxford Terrace, east, on the Prophecies ofthe Book of Daniel, with special reference to the second adrent of Christ. The lecturer's remarks were illustrated by a chart prepared to elucidate the subject. There was a moderate attendance, and the Eev C. Dallaston occupied the chair. We have to record a fatal occurrence in the Bangitata district. On Monday last, Mr Heney, senr. (proprietor of the coach running between the Bangitata Bailway Station, Bangitata, and Peel Forest), did not return to his home, and his son-in-law, Mr Adam Eae, on Tuesday morning went to search for him. He was found in the cutting near the Bangitata traffic bridge, lying under his overturned coach. The unfortunate man was quite dead. How the accident occurred, at present no one can tell. Mr Heney was a very old resident in the district, and universally respected. The final meeting in connection with the annual sports at Sefton was held on Monday evening last. Owing to the inclemency of the weather there was only a moderate attendance of the Committee. Prizes and accounts to the amount of £70 were passed for payment. In the protest lodged by Mr Truman in the Flat Hack Eace it was decided to allow the dispute to stand over till the return of the Secretary of the Eangiora Eacing Club. The Secretary was instructed to apply to the Secretary of the Canterbury Jockey Club for certain information re the above. A vote of thanks to the chair terminated a very successful country meeting. j The fortnightly meeting of the Ashburton Borough Council was held on Monday evening last; present — all the members. On the recommendation of a sub-Committee, Mr Davison was reappointed Inspector of Nuisances, at a salary of £50 per annum. In reply to a request from the Secretary, and on the motion of Councillor St Hill, it was resolved to vote the sum pf .£ls to the Western Fire Brigade. The Works Committee were empowered to dispense with the services of the labour gang for two months, to enable the men to go harvesting. A sub-Committee was appointed to deal with the question of making fresh arrangements with the Gas Company for lighting the [town, and cab and drivers' licenses were granted to D. M'Bae and J. W. M'Eae, and, after the transaction of some routine business, the Council ad- , journed. The members of the Bangiora branch ef the Blue Ribbon Gospel Temperance Mission held a meeting at the Good Templar Hall, Eangiora, last evening, to elect a permanent Committee to carry on the work of the Mission. About 40 persons were present, and after the meeting had been opened with prayer, the Yen Archdeacon Dudley was voted to the chair. The Eev J. A. Dawson, Secretary to the Preliminary Committee, read a statement of the receipts and expenditure in connection with the public meetings held some time ago, showing a debit balance of lis lOd. It was then resolved to elect a President, two Vice-Presidents, Secretary, Treasurer, and a Committee of twelve to govern the movements of the branch. The following were then elected : — President, the Yen Archdeacon Dudley ; Vice-Presi- i dents, the Bey J. Parkin and Mr J. ] Johnston ; Treasurer, Mr G. Watson ; Secretary, the Eev T: Hodgson ; Committee, the Eev J. Smith, Messrs T. Keir, J. Seed, W. Allington, S. Ayers, J. Lewis, T. G. Smith, J. Sutcliffe, W. Efford, : T. Smith, E. E. Good, and W. Foster. Some discussion arose as to whether a Committee of ladies should also be appointed, but it was agreed to leave the matter in abeyance until the next public meeting. It waa decided to hold a public meeting in the Institute Hall on Tuesday evening, Feb. 5, and the Secretary was instructed to ask Mr T. S. Mannering to preside, and three other gentlemen (who were selected) to give addresses. A few minor matters were then arranged, and the meeting closed with prayer. j

Messrs Acid and Gray notify elsewhere that a trial of their New Zealand twine i binder will be held to-morrow at Fernside. An address on the Nationalisation of the Land question will be delivered by Mr J. Ollivier, at 7.30 to-morrow evening, in the Oddfellows' Hall, Lichfield street. Sir William Fox is expected to visit Christchurch in about a month or six weeks' time, when he will probably lecture on temperance questions, and also lay a memorial stone at the new building of the Young Men's Christian Association. The tender of Messrs Ogilvie and Co. has been accepted for the construction of gates and fencing at the new cemetery, on Eeserve No. 210. The surveying of the boundaries has been completed, and the fencing will be proceeded with at once. The following items appear on our fourth page: Tale— "Jungle Jenny; or the Eomance of a Girl Wild Beast Tamer (concluded.) Disastrous Gale at Barotonga ; Application to Cancel a Prohibition Order ; Meeting of Societies ; the Crops. Messrs Thomas Atkinson and E. Clephane have been nominated to the seat on the Christchurch District Drainage Board, rendered vacant by the resignation of Mr A. Dunbar. The poll will b 6 held at the Heathcote Eoad Board Office on Feb. 1. The trial of grass-seed strippers under the auspices of the Canterbury Agricultural and Pastoral Association, which has been twice postponed on account of the late rains, will, weather permitting, take place on Friday at the farm of Messrs J Henderson and M'Beath, near the Junction Hotel, Spreydon. This morning a man named Arthur Hudson, otherwise known as " Stuttering George," was arrested by Detective O'Connor on suspicion of being concerned in a case of robbery with violence together with Charles Cooper, who was remanded at the Eesident Magistrate's Court this morning. A meeting of the members of the North Canterbury Hunt Club was to have been held at the Junction Hotel, Eangiora, yesterday afternoon, but owing, no doubt, to the bad state of the weather, very few turned up, and those who did attend decided to postpone the meeting until Tuesday. | The examination for teachers' certificates is now being carried on at the J Normal school, tmder the supervision of Mr Edge, Inspector of Schools. There are [ altogether 189 candidates, 31 of whom are I entered for Class D, 53 for Class E, and 55 for complete certificates, these last being candidates who failed in some one subject at the last examination. I In March next an Intercolonial Exhibition is to be opened in the Melbourne Exhibition buildings, for the purpose of displaying and comparing Australasian | products. There are fourteen classes speI cified in the schedule, including foods and j drinks, forest and plant products, and machinery, plant, and tools. It is intended that the Exhibition shall remain | open for a fortnight. "Mother Goose" was presented again last evening to a fairly good audience at the Theatre Eoyal, the attendanoe downstairs being especially large. The pantomime went as well as usual, and the customary demands for encores had to be acceded to. Miss Amy Horton and Miss Archer repeated some of their songs ; and the hornpipe was also re-demanded, as is generally the case. His Honor Mr Justice Johnston and a special jury of twelve were engaged all day yesterday with the trial of Crerar against the New Zealand Grain Agency. The business done consisted of the cross-examination and re-ex-amination of Mr Lawrence V. Desborough, the last of which was not concluded when the Court adjourned at 5.30 p.m. till 10 o'clock this morning. The case of Duncan v. Booth has been again postponed for a day. The Dramatic Society connected with the Christchurch Working Men's Club have arranged to produce Eobertson's comedy "Caste" to-morrow evening, in the new hall attached to the Club. Mr W. S. Williamß, President of the Dramatic Society, has been chiefly instrumental in arranging for the performance, and he haa been fortunate in securing the services of Misses Thompson and Fisher and Mrs Jerman to take the female characters in the piece. The Bohemians held their first annual meeting on Tuesday evening, at the Eoyal George Hotel. Mr W. Breen was voted to the chair. Accounts to the amount ef .£l3 7s were passed for payment, after which the election of officers for the ansuing term took place, and resulted as follows : — F. W. Parker, President ; A. E. Triggs, Secretary ; J. Francis, Treasurer ; W. Davis, stage manager ; W. Breen, property manager. A vote of thanks to the Chairman brought the meeting to a close. Gloucester street, in front of the Theatre Eoyal, was greatly thronged last evening, between half-past seven and eight o'clock, when the Australian Blondin gave a free exhibition of his wonderful feats upon the tight rope. Many of the large assembly thus got together continued the' amusement they had begun by adjourning to either the Circus or the Theatre Eoyal, the proprietors of which had no reason to regret their having changed what would otherwise have been a counter-attraction into an additional " draw " for their own "shows." A meeting in connection with the East Malvern Library was held in the Eoad Hoard office, Sheffield, on Monday evening. There was a small attendance. Mr C. J. Eae occupied the chair. The resolutions passed during the evening were : — " (1) That the resolution passed at the public meeting on Jan. 11, ' that the land be vested in the Public Trustee/ be rescinded; (2) that Messrs F. Bull, D. M'Millan, and J. Armstrong be the Trustees; (3) that Messrs C. Higgins and G. Brown be Auditors for the current year." The Chairman was also instructed to collect information re the cost of removing the Library building. The Handicap Tourney, under the auspices of the Canterbury Chess Club, was commenced at the room of the Club, in the Public Library, last evening. The following are the handicaps : — lst Class — Messrs H. Hookham, P. F. Jacobsen, F. Horwood, J. Wood; 2nd Class— Mr A. H. Todd ; 3rd Class— Messrs W. Acton Adams, E. M. Clissold, W. Cuddon, O. Peez, E. A. Joseph ; 4th Class — Messrs J. G. Scott, A. Smith, and H. J. Tancred. The first class gives to the second a pawn and a move, to the third a knight, and to the fourth a rook. The second gives to the third a pawn and a move, and to the fourth a knight. The third class gives a pawn and a move to the fourth. Mr A. M. Ollivier acted as handicapper. Each competitor has to play two games with every other competitor. At the conclusion of the play last evening tliree games were decided, Mr Hookham having won one from Mr Tancred, Mr Jacobsen one from Mr Scott, and Mr Acton Adams one from Mr Todd. The following is the Inspectors' report on tlie Eangfiora Borough schools: — Number of children on the roll, 279; number present, 250; average last quarter, 205'G ; percentage of attend- | ance to roll number, 73 ; presented in standards, 138 ; passed, 110 ; percentage passed, 797 ; percentage of roll number presented, 49-3. The general remarks made by tho Inspectors ran as follow: — "The tone and discipline of the school are good ; the children are well behaved and set about their work vigorously. We, however, would draw attention to the fact that there is too much shouting at the children, and a corresponding amount of noise on the part of the latter. There is an advance in the quality of the work, but there is still room for noatness. Reading and recitation have been more carefully taught throughout the school. The arithmetic of Standard IV. and the geography of Standard V. are much below what they should be in such a school as that of Eangiora. The infant department, under Miss S. Kitchingman, is well conducted. The class drill and singing aro of considerable merit. Drawing and science are fairly well taught. Sewing is also well taught."

The Te Anau reached Lyttolton this afternoon from Wellington, after the long passage of 28 hours. The London correspondent of the Melbourne Argus states that Dr Barker's experience as a frequent attendant at executions in Victoria during the last quarter of a century has been referred to in the Times, in justification of the steps lately taken by the public hangman Binnß when executing a criminal at Liverpool. At the inquest Dr Jameß Barr complained that the hanging- was badly done, because " the noose was placed in the wrong position, in the nape of the neck, instead of under the ear ;" the consequence of which was that the man died from strangulation, and had not his neck broken. " Physician," writing to the Timee, points out that even the hangman should not be censured ignorantly, and proceeds to state " that Dr Barker, of Melbourne, who haß beon striving for 27 years to make hanging as merciful as possible, advocates the knot of the noose being placed on the spine as the most effectual means of fracturing the vertebras. He made 50 post-mortem examinations of criminals hanged in the ordinary way, and did not find dislocation or fracture of the vertebrae in a single case. But by his method of placing the knot about 2in from the spine he found that there was a dislocation between the second and third cervical vertebra, with fracture of the third, and pressure on the spinal cord. The Berlin correspondent of The Times, writing of Field -Marshal Count von Moltke, on the eve of his eightyfourth birthday, says :— " Before the autumn manoeuvres, from the middle of August to the middle of September, he disappears every year from public view, and even his friends and familiars do not know where he is. This time is devoted to travelling, and especially to mountain climbing, in whioh exercise he usually excels his young companions. Although he has a substitute in the QuartermasterGeneral, Count Waldersee, he likes to decide all important matters himself. Essays by officers of the general staff and opinions of the heads of departments are constantly sent up to him for criticism, and he writes on the broad margins, in a small, clear hand, observations remarkable not only for professional acuteneas, but for beauty of style and precision of thought. He rises early, takes a walk in hie own grounds at Ereisau, or sometimes, when in Berlin, in the Thiergarten, and then works f enerally till the hour «f his simple dinner. [c seldom smokes after that meal, snuff being the form in which he, like Frederick the Great, enjoys tobaoco. When he works he always has his snuff box near him. In the afternoon he receives or pays visits. In the evening he likes to play whist with his nephew, Captain von Moltke, and other friends. Even during the Frenoh war he was accustomed to play whist when possible, and his adjutant, Colonel de Claer, had to provide suitable players. After the Emperor, Field Marshal von Moltke is beyond question the most popular man in Germany. Count von Moltke is a widower, and has no children. He was happily married for 28 yearß to a lady whose maiden name was Burt, who died in 1868. Being very simple in his tastes, he spends little on himself, but is ever ready to help his relations." Mr Charles Rogers, an old Ballarat resident, has of late been working on the Barnet-Falk diamond fields, Bingera, New South Wales (says the Ballarat Star), and according to a statement made by him, he has succeeded in securing 4000 diamonds in return for 12 months' work. The diamonds range in size from half a grain to eight carats. He states that so far his success in diamond-finding has only been the result of scratching the surface of the ground, but with the view of further development, Mr Bogers says that he has sold the lease of the diamond-studded ground to a company of diamond merchants, Messrs Falk and Co., and that he has joined them in securing that portion of the district which is so rich in treasure. The value of the ground or property contained in the lease is estimated at .£1,000,000. Mr Rogers has come to Ballarat for the purpose of purchasing suitable machinery for " rooting up " the diamonds in Bingera. Messrs Philip Falk and Co., who are connected with the lease, have, we are informed, branches of their firm in London, Hamburg, Melbourne, and Adelaide. The Shanghai correspondent of the Times has the following relative to the falling-off in the yield of China silk. In 1882 the falling-off was considerable, but last year the quantity fit for export was less than half of the average amount. He adds : — " And the worst of it is that there is some reason to suppose that the deficiency is owing to a disease in the silkworm similar to that which committed suoh ravages in Europe. If it should be so, the effect upon our trade would be most serious. The exports from China are barely sufficient to pay for the imports, and it needs no prophetic vision to see that a permanent falling-off in such an important item as silk would reduce the purchasing power of the country in a very short time The attention of the Pekin Government has been called to the fact by a complaint from this Province, that owing to the falling off in the internal dues on silk, the local exchequer is unable to meet the calls on it as heretofore. The complaint in question ascribes the decrease to the adverse season solely, but it is high time steps were being taken to have the question settled, for if it is really true, as alleged, that disease is rampant, the direct loss to Government in the falling off of duties would be moßt serious, and the indirect loss by the disorganisation of a large part of the foreign trade of the country would be little less than disastrous. Nothing, however, can be done, except by the Government itself. We have been so jealously excluded from all participation in the preparation of silk in the interior that the information and assistance which foreigners might have rendered in a case of this kind cannot now be forthcoming." The author of " Underground Rusßia" pub; lishes in the Spectator some account of the present condition of affairs in that country. He states that the Czar, influenced by his Danish relatives, returned from his recent visit to Copenhagen with the desire to grant a larger measure of liberty to his subjects. In this project he is said to have been supported by the Melikoff section of his own Court. Further, he is said to have been startled by the state of things in the Army, where revolutionary ideas are taking root. It is alleged that at Timborsk as many as 104 officers and men have been put under arrest. But the great parties in the State are not agreed as to the remedies. One idea iB "to divide the Empire in 20 Kingdoms, each with its own Parliament and Viceroy." " The present crisis," says Stepniak, " may result in important reforms ; it may equally result, after a few weeks of indecision, in nothing more than a change of personnel and a few bureaucratic palliatives."

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Bibliographic details

Local & General., Star, Issue 4906, 23 January 1884

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3,269

Local & General. Star, Issue 4906, 23 January 1884

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