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Local & General.

Messrs Ayers and Co. advertise an auction sale of freehold town sections in Lyttelton for next Tuesday.

A meeting of persons desirous of joining the Canterbury Yeomanry Cavalry will be held at the Empire Hotel on Monday, at 7.30 p.m.

A social gathering is to be held in the Fendalton schoolroom at six o'clock on Monday evening, for the purpose of welcoming the new incumbent, the Eev J. Chaffers-Welsh.

The City Council are about to call for tenders for the gates and fences for the proposed new cemetery, near the canal reserve, and the work of surveying the boundaries, &c, will be commenced at once.

The late City Guards Band will continue the series of open air concerts on the lawn of the Working Men's Club this evening at 8 o'clock, when they will play the following programme : — Quick Step " lolanthe;" Quadrille, " Shamrock Leaves 5 " Selection, "Homage au Nord;" Valse, " Under the Stars ; " Polka, " Imperial ; " Selection, "Royal Musketeers;" Schottische, " Enchantment ; " Quick Step, " Good-bye, Nellie dear ; " Galop, " The Scout 5 " National Anthem.

A batch of larrikins received a severe lesson in the Waimate Court yesterday. It was proved that they visited a farmhouse at Makikihi, at 2 a.m., on NewYear's Day, kicked up a tremendous row, and hurled stones on the roof and through the windows, doing damage to the amount of £2. The farmer remonstrating was called outside, knocked down, and struck several times. The offenders— four in number — were fined in the maximum penalty of £5, with the alternative of a month's imprisonment, the Resident Magistrate stating the Bench was determined to put down the nuisance of larrikinism.

A meeting of the South Canterbury Caledonian Society was held yesterday evening at the Grosvenor Hotel ; the President (Mr Donald Maclean) in the chair* The balance-sheet in connection with the recent sports was adopted, showing a net balance to credit, after paying all expenses, of ,£127 Bs. This was considered highly satisfactory, and Messrs M'Pherson (Treasurer) and D. Stuart were authorised to invest for twelve months with a building society or bank as a fixed deposit. A donation of £o was voted to the funds of the Timaru Hospital, and a bonus of £5 to the Secretary, Mr Sydney Davis, for his assiduity, together with a hearty vote of thanks.

Yesterday, Judge Hardcastle had along sitting in the Ashburton District Court, hearing the case of Martin v. Brown, a claim of JEIOO, for damages alleged to have been suffered by plaintiff through the carelessness of defendant and his workmen. Plaintiff, on Nov. 21, had received a nasty cut on the knee, caused by a chisel which had flown from the hand of one of defendant's workmen, while engaged on a verandah, underneath which plaintiff was walking. Judgment, after lengthy evidence, was given for plaintiff — £5 special damages, and £2 6s 6d medical expenses, but costs were not allowed. When the case was over, it was discovered that Judge Hardcastle, though Deputy Judge for Timaru and Christchurch, was not deputy for Ashburton, and the .whole of the proceedings had to be quashed.

A combined meeting of the Pioneer and Christchurch Bicycle Clubs was held at the Commercial Hotel last evening. Mr T. Searell presided, and there was a good attendance. The Chairman announced that the races held in Lancaster Park on Boxing Day had been very successful, both ; as regards the competition in the various events and financially. After paying prizes and all expenses, a balance of .£ls remained to the good. The total amount of prize money amounted to £76 ss, .£3B 10s of which had been given by private donors. On the motion of the Chairman, hearty thanks were accorded to those gentlemen who had given prizes, and the Secretary was instructed to convey the thanks of the Club to the donors. It was decided to have a run to Tai Tapu on Saturday, Jan. 19, in which members of both Clubs are invited to take part. A discussion took place on the Dunedin Bicycle races, on Feb. 2, and a very good suggestion was thrown out — that the two Clubs should combine in contributing towards the expenses of two or three of their members who should go to Dunedin to race for the honour of the Christchurch bicyclists.

Yesterday a number of the members of the South Waimakariri Board of Conservators paid a visit to the protective works at Chaney's Corner, in order to decide -what action should be taken in consequence of the encroachments of the river at that spot. Those present were Messrs Peryman (Chairman), England, White, Jones, and Moorhouse, and the party left town in a drag from Mr Terrell's stables at about 10 a.m., returning in the afternoon. It was found that the cause of the trouble was the water coming from the north branch of the river through Coutts' cutting, which, during the recent small freshes, has thrown up a shingle bank in the river bed a little distance above embankment No. 1. This . bank causes the water to set in against the river-bank above the work. As the former is of a loose, sandy nature, it does not afford much resistance to the stream. As, however, the encroachment is not dangerous to Christchurch — the river there is not on a muoh higher level than the city — and as the Board have not funds sufficient to erect and maintain the works necessary to protect the threatened spot, it was agreed to leave the matter in abeyance for the present. An opinion was pretty generally expressed that the best solution of the difficulty would be the making of a cutting across the island so as to convey the water from Coutts' cutting into the river below the bridge. This work, however, is one which does not come within the jurisdiction of the Board.

It may be news to very many people who have watched the glowing sunsets of the last four months that the sunrises present the same phenomenal appearance. Not so extended as the sunsets, they are on the whole more intense in hue and more varied in colour. It is not uncommon to see the sky of a morning tinted like a rainbow, from light green and yellow to bright pink and rose. Yesterday, at dawn, the eastern corner of. the Port hills was to be seen darkly outlined against a brilliant mass of rose-coloured light. Just then the firebells rang and brought people out of their beds. It is safe to say that nineteen of every twenty imagined the fire was in Lyttelton, or in that direction. One observer, learning where the fire really was, said: "Well, what is that light over the hills ?" " Why, the glow before sunrise," was the answer. '•What, sunrise at a quarter to three ! I declare if I haven't been watching that light out of my window for the last quarter of an hour, and thinking what a tremendous fire it was." This " watching from the window " business was the experience of more than one who eagerly scanned the morning papers for the account of a tremendous conflagration. The fact that no fire was to be seen from Howe's Btore materially helped the illusion. Other people, who knew where the fire was, were certain that there was a serious blaze in Lyttelton, too, and their simplicity mightily amused the few who were in the secret. It Beems rather too early an hour to get np at three o'clock, but the sacrifice of two or three hours' sleep any fine morning will be rewarded by a more gorgeous spectacle than even the magnificent sunsets afford. i

Last night the Christchurch Regatta Club was formed, officers were elected, and it was resolved to hold the regatta on Feb. 23.

Tho whole of yesterday was occupied at the Supreme Court by the trial of Daniel Maydwell on a charge of false pretences. It resulted in a verdict of " Not Guilty."

The following items appear on our fourth page : — Tale — "The Reverend John Creedy " (concluded) ; Annual School Festivals ; Annual Sports ; The Bitter Cry of Outcast London.

The election of a Councillor at Kafapoi to fill the vacancy caused by Mr Moore's accession to the Mayoral chair took place yesterday, and resulted in Mr W. Fraser defeating his opponent — Mr A. Simpson by 37 votes. Considerable interest was manifested in the election. Both the candidates returned thanks. The actual result of the poll was— Fraser, 92 ; Simpson, 55.

The work of erecting the large iron gates presented to the Domain Board by Messrs Joubert and Twopeny has been just completed, and they now form an appropriate ornament to the main entrance of the Domain, at the end of Hereford street. The gates formerly in that position have been removed to the entrance beside the Museum, and are a great improvement upon those formerly at that place.

A meeting of tho Cure Boating Club was held on Wednesday evening, Mr Wearing presiding. The amounts due to the winning crews in the recent regatta were passed for payment, and a vote of thanks was also accorded to them. The Secretary was appointed delegate to represent the Club in the liquidation of United Canterbury Boating Club. Other matters of detail were dealt with, and the meeting adjourned.

The Polk Company appeared again in "An Arabian Night last evening, when there was a moderate audience, the stalls and pit being fairly patronised. This evening " The Strategist," with which the Company made such a hit on their arrival, will be repeated for one night only. " Sarn'l o' Posen " is announced for its first production on Saturday, when the Company make their farewell performance in Christchurch.

The Committee appointed to establish a public library and reading-room at Richmond, have so far completed their labours that the rooms, which are situated at the junction of Stanmore road and London street, are now open. In addition to tbe ordinary reading-room, an apartment has been provided for the accommodation of smokers, and provision has also been made for playing chess, draughts, &c. The books for the circulating library are expected to be ready in a few days, and Mr AbercroinbieTias been appointed librarian.

The Lyttelton Naval Brigade will shortly commence heavy gun drill, in consequence of the Defence department at Wellington having forwarded a heavy gun complete, fitted on a ship's carriage, for the purpose of the Bpecial drill pertaining to Naval Brigades. The idea was a wise one on the part of the department, as the men were getting surfeited with the rifle drill, and this new departure will tend to give renewed vigour to this popular and successful corps. There are a good number of applicants for admission in the ranks, this being the recruiting month.

About 8 o'clock last evening considerable excitement was occasioned in the vicinity of Armagh street bridge by the misfortunes of a horse harnessed in a trap containing Mr H. Duncan and his younger brother. They had driven the vehicle into the river, for the purpose of watering the horse, but the animal, finding the water up to its belly, became frightened and refused to stir. The efforts of the occupants of the trap to urge the animal out of the stream soon attracted a crowd, and a rope Was fastened to the brute's head to endeavour to lead it out. The animal resisted strenuously, however, and, on the application ef the whip, began to rear and plunge, and finally fell over, becoming so entangled in the shafts and harness as to be unable to rise. It struggled violently, but was unable to extricate itself. The crowd on the bank of course yelled out all sorts of contradictory advice to the occupants of the trap, who at last jumped out of the vehicle up to their waists in the river, and, while one held the horse's head above the water, the other disengaged it from the harness, and> after some few minutes, got the animal clear and led it out. Though it had certainly had a very narrow escape from being drowned, it did not appear to be much the worse for its adventure. The harness was a good deal damaged, and the trap slightly injured.

A late issue of the Wellington Post states that the Gear Company ace preparing to make large shipments of frozen meat to London shortly. Their first vessel will be the Lady Jocelyn, whoee chambers have been enlarged to a capacity of 10,000 carcases, which will be frozen on board. All the space is engaged, and she will leave about the end of the month. The steamer Victory will leave sooner, and will take 2000 to 3000 carcases. The Shaw, Savill and Albion Bteainer Bombay will follow the Victory next month, taking about 7000 carcases. Her cargo will be frozen on a hulk, the machinery for which will be ready in a few days. 'The Company have made arrangements to freeze meat and dispose of it in London on the shippers' account at a commission of 5 per cent and a payment of 3sd per lb for general expenses, and the Post is informed that a large number of runholders and graziers are availing themselves of this opportunity to forward shipments of mutton at their own risk. The Directors have been placed in an awkward predicament, about 5000 sheep purchased in the Wairarapa district for freezing being "stuck up" owing to xome of the runs through which they must pass on their way to Wellington being infected, and the Inspector refused to grant a permit, and the Government decline to interfere.

The Imperial Patent Office at Berlin hat recently decided a dispute seriously affecting the interest of the paper trade throughout Germany. A German professor some years ago obtained a patent for a process invented by himself for the employment of wood pulp in the manufacture of paper. Since that time he has been issuing licenses, and every manufacturer in the empire who has made use of the process has had to pay the inventor the sum of 15,000 marks, or \£7sO sterling, per annum. The revenue of the professor for some time past is calculated to have been nearly half a million marks, or .£25,000 sterling, annually, as the number of firms paying for licenses was between 30 and 40. A few months back, however, Herr Behrend, a paperutftker of Varzin, in Pomerania, brought to the notice of the Imperial Patent Office the fact that the professor's process was precisely the same a* that invented by Mr Tilghman, an American, and patented in Washington some time before that of the German inventor at Berlin. The announcement naturally produced great excitement throughout the trade in Germany, and the decision of the authorities was awaited with the deepest interest." After a thorough investigation into the matter by the patent officials the result was announced. It declared the so-called cellulose patent of the German patentee null and void, his process being found identical with that of the American, which had been patented abroad, but not in Germany. The professor thus at once loses his splendid revenue of half a million marks, and the German paper trade rejoices to find itself so unexpectedly liberated from a burdensome and vexatious impost. It is anticipated that the effect of the decision will be a large increase in the export of paper from Germany in future.

A late number of the Diario do Brazil says that while workmen were clearing out the river Joanna, one of the email streams flowing through Rio, a large and very old cedar chest was come upon buried in the mud, and when opened was found to contain many valuables, with gold and diamonds, such as lamps, swords, &c, which were taken to the Museum. As usual, the treasure trove is supposed to have belonged to the Jesuits, and to have been thrown by them into the river when pressed in their flight from Bio*

Municipal licenses of all descriptions for the preaent year are now ready for issue at the City Council offices, and licensoeß are requested to at once take up the same, in order that they may retain the numbers by which their permits havwbeen distinguished hitherto, and so save themsolves the trouble and expense of having to renumber their vehicles, &o. ,

In October next, oh joy ! the Claimant (says an English 2>apur) will be liberated on ticket-of-leave. His frionds have promised to then rally round him and sot him up in a publichouse. This is as it should bo, for a sporting bar is jiißt the place for him. My conviction is that in this position he Will attract enormously, and uiairc almost as much money as if he had contrived to get the estates to which he once aspired. His inn is to be colled the Tichborao Anna. — London Correspondent.

An unfortunate young fellow (flays an exchange) seeking to escape from Hamburg hid himself among the bales of merchandise of a ship he supposed to bo bound for England, taking with him a piece of meat that would have^ Bppplied him for such a voyage. The ship, however, was sailing for the west coast of Africa. On arrival at its destination, and its cargo being unloaded, his body waß found " completely blooked in bales." He had been evidently starved to death. What agonies uvußt have been his through the long watches of the night, aud worse, in the day time, when the sailors worked and sang above him, and he had no means of making his presence known to them P "ABtranger both to crew and passengers," ho is described 5 yet Bomeone had known and loved him, doubtless; and his age, "abfeut 20." Poor Btowaway !

A meeting of those interested in resuscitating the Eangiora Debating Society waß held at the Institute on Wednesday evening lost. The Rev J. A. Dawson was chosen Chairman. After some discussion it was decided that the Society should be again started, and called the Bangiora Literary and Debating Society. Mr C. E. Tribe was elected President, and Mr Wallace Haworth Secretary. Rules were formed, one being that no discussion on theological subjects should be allowed. It was agreed that no perBon Bhould be admitted a member of the Society unless a subscriber to the Literary Institute, the fee for admission to be the nominal one of a shilling. Wednesday evenings were fixed for the weekly meetings, and it was^arranged to have a discussion at the next meeting, probably on " Protection v. Freetrade." The meeting then adjourned.

The Marlborough Express has been shown a le# sft Gin in length, and fully 9ift across in the widest part, which was cut off a palm-like tree, at a height of some 3000 ft above the sea, on a mountain in the Upper Pelorue. Mr Goulter informs the Express that this is the first tree of the kind he lias ever come across in the Colony, and the only other persons we can ascertain to have ever seen similar trees are Mr Wilson, of the Survey Department, and three men working for him, who found a couple of trees near the summit of Mount Stokeß in the Pelorus Sounds district. Mr Wilson and his men, though all most experienced bushmen, had never seen a similar groWth'bpfore. The tqee has the appearance or a very large-leaved cabbage-tree, and has probably grown from seed of one of the larger classes of palms indigenous to the Islands, and brought hither by chance by some migratory birds.

The tnißtees in the bankrupt estate of Hudson, Ridley and Co. (Messrs M. Harris and A. Moore) have accepted H. E. Hay 'and Co.'s cash offer of 8« 6d in the *<or the drapery stock and 10b in the & for the glassware. The stock Was taken at landed cost. ■ [Ai>vt.]

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Permanent link to this item

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Bibliographic details

Local & General., Star, Issue 4896, 11 January 1884

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3,302

Local & General. Star, Issue 4896, 11 January 1884

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