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Miscellaneous.

Amsterdam intends her coming International Exhibition to be a great succeis. Klaborate arrangements are now being made for the buildings, which are to include numerous annexes and to cover 70 acres of ground, while the visitors will be enlivened by the mußie of all nations and a captive balloon rivalling the Paris monster of 1878. The Exhibition will, however, be chiefly devoted to Colonial products and articles connocted with the export trade, and the Dutoh are particularly anxious to compare their own Colonial exhibits with those of our Indian, African, and Australian possessions. Tho British Colonies will be largely represented, and a special Commission has also boon formed for Great Britain. By the Orient steamer Austral, sailed from this country for Now Zealand Mr and Mrs Francis Arkwright and daughter, of Overton Hall, Cheshire We Btated some time ago that Mr Arkwright had decided to settle in the Colony, and he now goes to reside upon his proporty at Wanganui. Previous to his departuro the Conservative Associations of the division recently represented by Mr Arkwright, took tho opportunity of presenting him with an album of views in Derbyshire, and an address expressing their regret at his removal from amonget theai, and their deep sense of the services which he had rendered to tho constitutional cause. In acknowledging tho gift Mr Arkwright said he did not think it probable that he 6hould ever renew his Derbyshire associations by residence. Tho reputation of tho Black Poll bulls is, we know, world-wide, but it is astonishing tho keen demand which has sprung up for Hub breed of late, and it is probablo that within the pist eighteen months moro than 500 specimens have been shipped to Australia, South America, Canada, and tho United States. Tho cry from tho United Stales is still for more Polls, and it would seem that if all animals of the breed now in this country wore eont across to them, the wants of our Transatlantic coußins would still be unsatisfied. This great expansion in the demand for tho northern Polls has of courso brought forth a corresponding incroaso in their market value. About twelve months ago good Polled cows, with ordinary pedigrees, would havo sold at from 30 guineas to 45 guineas, whilo others of the better breed and moro distinguished families sold from 50 guineas to 100 guineas on an average. 6im-o then prices have risen by ut least 50 per cent, and still higher figures could be obtained for choice animals if their owners could bo induced to part with thorn. ■ Tho Premier, replying to a congratulatory address prcsontcd to him by tho Liberal Ahsociation at Pennmonmawr on Oct. b, whilo , the Hight lion gcntloman was returning wilh j Mrs Qladttono to Hawarden, roforrod, among t other topics, to the waj in Egypt M ft juitifi-

able one, and said:— "l thank God tbe Almighty for the great success whioh has been given to British arms, and we have caufse to thank the gallant men who .formed the army and the officers who led those gallant men to victory, and the able and skilful General who planned and carried out the campaign. This war has preyed that our army is composed of men as brave as their forefathers everywhere, or wherever led to victory by generals in the past. I should not speak of the mere triumph of armies in any glowing terme wero not the oauee of the war justifiable. We have carried out this war from a love of peace, and I may say on the principles of pence. We have been pulling down a military anarchy. It is impossible for any country to prosper under a military tyraany ; and now that the war is over we trust that Egypt, the great gateway to the East, may once more be prosperous and happy." It is no easy feat of administrative ability to conduct an army of 16,000 men of all arms of the service over six miles of dcßert without a tree or landmark of any kind, oh a pitch-dark night, and place them at a fixed hour in their precisely appointed places at stated intervals without hesitation or mistake; and this is what Sir Garnet Wolseley bo ably did the night before the battle of Tel-el-Kebir. The oonduct of the advance was placed chiefly in the hands of General Good enough, Colonel Buller and Lieutenant Baweon, which lastnamed officer was unhappily subsequently shot. They steered by the stars, and their astronomioal lore was never for one moment at fault. When the Indian contingent were at Zag-a-Zig, says the Daily News correspondent, they paid a visit to Arabi's native village, a plaoe called Kharich, three milee from the town. He has a farm there of fifty-three aores, and at Tel-el-Mouftah, about five milee from Zag a-Zig, he haß another farm of ninetyseven acres. Shortly before the bombardment of Alexandria he purchased eight hundred fedans of land at Lekhawioh, Gargounah, and Kiad, and paid for it, but has not yet reoeived the title-deeds. At Kbarioh and Tel-el-Mouftah the Indian Cavalry cut down all the green maize for their horses, and seized all the barley and ohopped straw. Many Arabs were found there of the fellaheen class, who had known Arabi from hit infancy, and had been playmates in his childhood. His father and brother usually resided on these farms, but had fled at the approach of the English. It has been determined to give a war medal to all who took a military part in the recent Egyptian campaigns, and plans have been taken to aeoure its distribution immediately on the return of the first troops from the war. The design on the reverse will be a Sphinx, with the word "Egypt" and the date 1882 On the other side will be the Queen's head, the same as that on the Ashantee medal. The colour of the riband and number of clasps to accompany the medal have not yet been deoided upon. A private of the Ist Life Guards came in, after the oharge at Kastassin, with a nasty sabre out across his left arm. Bespeoting this wound the following conversation was heard to ensue :— " Why, Bill, how did you get that?" "Well, you Bee, I got off my 'orse to take one o' these Harabs prisoner, and blessed if the beggar didn't up with his cheese knife and give me this 'ere slice," " Well, what did you do ?" " Well, I drew my sword and halved the beggar !" Major G. W. A. FitzGeorge, 20th Husears, who has been selected by Sir G. Wolseley to carry home his deipatches, will get a brevet lieutenant-colonelcy for his special Bfirvioe, but will not get the money reward of £500 which was formerly given. The money grant was abolished at tbe close of the Zulu campaign. Major FitzGeorgo has been doing useful service at the War Office for some years, and his selection for this special mission may be regarded as a well-merited recognition of his professional services. It is worthy of remark that Sir Garnet Wolseley is the first General who hap had a British force under command in whioh discipline had to be maintained without recourse to the lash. This faot, it is said, is mainly attributable to the teetotal principles inculcated by the General. The supply of tea was liberal, and beer was allowed on the march, while spirits were positively interdicted to men and officers alike. " Firewater" appears to be the most active agent in leading our men into acts of insubordination, and commanders in future campaigns will do well to note the example set by Sir Garnet Wolseley.

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Bibliographic details

Miscellaneous., Star, Issue 4546, 18 November 1882

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1,275

Miscellaneous. Star, Issue 4546, 18 November 1882

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