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On our fourth page will be found a continuation of the story commenced on Saturday; some illustrations of instinct and reason, and some "hash." As already announced, a meeting of the Industrial Association will ba held this evening, at half-past seven, in the Congregational schoolroom. The meeting of ratepayers in the Avon Eoad Board district will be held this evening at Paponui, to take into consideration, the amended boundaries of the district. Some magnificent peaches, of the " Apricot fleshed " variety have been shown to us by Mr Jaciman, in whose orchard they wero Crown. Eighteen of these fine peaches weighed exactly six pounds. Only nineteen dogs hava been registered this year in the Borough, of KaDgion*. Asa ranger has now been appointed, the memories of dog owners will no doubt be revived. According tn a Daily Times correspondent whole fields of excellent wheat have been destroyed by rabbits in the vicinity of the Waikaka river. The following will play at Ha»ley Park on Thursday for the M.0.0.0. against Lyttelton : — Messrs A tack, Judge, Dunbar, Bell, Hill, Harper, Pavitt, L'orner, lodge, Cohen, and Saston. : A lady put her watch under her pillow the other night, but couldn't keep it there because it disturbed her sleep. And there, all the time, was her bed ticking right underneath her, and she never thought of that at all. The Auckland Star regards the privilege of electing the Licensing Committees as the fora-runner of many other similar advantages. On that' account it regrets the extreme apathy of the Southern districts. The following have been choßen to play for the Midland Club in their return match against the United Club, to be played on the next three Saturdays :— Messrs Atack, Buchanan, Cohen, Fowke, J. Fooler, tfairhurst, Fuller, Fhilpott, Strange, Washer, Watson; emergency, Lodge. An extraordinary disclosure was made at the Police Court this morning, respecting the sanitary condition of one of the principal hotels in this city— the White Hart. The Health Officer addressed (he Court in refer ence to the danger arising from suoh a state of things ; and the maximum penalty was imposed. More of our waste and natural produotß are at length to be utilised, and in a direction which ought to tend very appreciably towards the advancement of our farming in* terests. The New Zealand Drug Company, having successfully initiated the manufacture of sulphuric acid, are about to undertakeon a large seale — the production of artificial manures. What the Press of this morning says it most likes about the nefociations between the two kings, Bryce and Bewi— if, as the Press cautiously remarks, they can be called negociations— " is the scrupulous regard to tenth and candour displayed by the Minister*, and the total absence of anything like cajolery." Evidently our contemporary is very pleased indeed at even the faintest indication, in Ministerial actions, of altogether unlooked-for virtues. Fresh evidence is being contributed as to the serious risks to life and limb caused by the now numerous street obstructions. More than one ugly-looking accident has occurred in streets in which tramways or drainage works are in progress ; but so far as can be at present judged, the civio authorities are either lamentably helpless or shamefully apathetic. A Linwood resident, writing to the Times of thiß morning, givea a telling instance of the danger of the obstructions. A contemporary assertß that the prolific weed known as the Bathurst burr is spreading in the North Island. This intelligence may not, perhaps, appear of much importance, to persons unacquainted with the characteristics of that troublesome and prolific weed ; but the Australian sheep farmer has learned to regard it with an aversion whioh no Englishman ever felt towards docks or thistles. The burr becomes entangled in the wool of sheep, seriously lessening its marketable value. By the last English mail Mr Armstrong, curator of the Public Gardens, received very valuable collections of seeds from Edinburgh and Germany. They were composed principally cf Beedß of Alpine aEd other herbaceous plants, and included three new species of iris, a scarlet flowered clematis, a North American yellow flowered mallow, and . several rare plants from the Punjaub. In addition to the above, some seeds have been received of a new species of raspberry from Japan. The work of erecting the Exhibition building is makirg good progress. The laying of the floor will probably be.' commenced by (he contractors for the walls and the roof, Messrs Cormichael and Son, about Wednesday next. The promoters intend applying to Government for the police pro* tection required for the Exhibition, and also for certain concessions in the Customs' tariff and railway arrangements. The application will be sent in when the Hon John Hall returns to Wellington from the North. A novel suggestion was made at the Christ* chuich Police Conrt this morning. A raid had been made on the Chinese, who appear to have been indulging in their national and " child-like " amusement, fan- tan. A remand beins reqnirsd by the counsel for the accused, the tioteciivo declared that if they were dispersed it would be impossible to identify them. Thereupon it was proposed to have photographß taken of the Celestials. The provision of a £25 surety in each case appears, however, to have been considered a sufficient safeguard. An aerial spectacle of singular beauty was visible to-day between one and two o'clock. About noon the wind changed to a southwesterly breeze, and the annual emigration j of thistle Beed from the Peninsula hills set in. By looking steadily skyward from a sheltered position, the air was seen to be laden with the silvery seeds ; and fieldglasses served to show that the unaided vision had not been able even to appreciate the depth of the seed-cloud. By a number of people who had become aware of the occurrence, the migration was watched with mach interest ; though possibly agriculturists on the plains would entertain somewhat different ideas on the subject. A late achievement in the art of newspaper printing is Scott's web printing and folding machine, on which the Chicago Telegraph is printed. In speed, ease of access and simplicity of arrangement, compactness, and excellent construction, it is said to be far superior to any machine yet produced. It can print and fold 30,000 perfect copies per hour, with only oue man and a boy to attend to it, and makes but little more noise than a sewing machine. The folding is dono by rotary creasora, and the folding devices can bo changed to fold different sized sheets and a different, number of folds. Messrs C. Potter, jun., and Co., of New York, are the buildors. The Fremier has been a-fishing ; and what is more, he proved himself to be either a wily or a lucky angler. According to a northern contemporary, the p.s. Tongariro went on a fishing excursion beyond Bangitoto reef, having on board the following gentlemen:- ■ i? on J. Hall (Premier), Hon F. Whitaltr, Messrs W. Swanson, T. Peacock, T. Thompson, Cosgrave, A. Whitaker, G. AicHn, T. T. Masefield, Bennett, W. Aitken, W. Buchanan, J. B. Macdonald, and Dr Honeyman. " The fiehiDg wa3 very successful, the Premier himself being about the mostrfortunate. He hauled them up two and three at a time, until he had secured over thirty-five fish." We refuse to believe that the paragraph is merely a malicious reference to the political angling in which the Premier has been indulging of late. At the outset of the scarlet foyer epidemic in Onehunga, gays the Auckland Star, the grossest negligence prevailed, and the town is paying dearly for its carelessness. We have heard of one milkman, owning about twenty cows, who permitted his children when recovering from the fever to milk the cows and deliver to his customers around the town, while the skin was actually peeling off their hands. Dr Scott avers that fifty cases in the beginning of Jannary were distinctly traceable to this one cause. The act 6eems to have been done in ignorance, but under a proper administration euch ignorance would be impossible. The pica is a very poor excuse to parents mourning the loss of dearly loved children who would have been living if men in authority had taken stops to enforce the hygienic regulations which the law places at their command.

The surveys and documents relating to the I Weßt Coast railway project were posted to Bir Julius Yogel on Saturday, in terms of the resolution passed at the recent meeting. It is in contemplation to hold a Bhow of autumn flowers in connection with the International Exhibition. It will probably take place some time during May. A show of provisions and produce will also be held in Ihe month of June. The infant child of a farm labourer, named Henry Faulkner, residing at Tai Tapu, died on Saturday, a few hours after its birth. Dr Preston, of Lincoln, saw the child after its death, but could not certify to the cause. An inquest will therefore have to be held. The nomination of members for the Oxford Licensing Committee was held at the Court-house on Saturday, at 12 noon, O. WMtefOOrd acting as Returning-Officor. The following gentlemen were nominated: — Messrs J. R. Gorton, E. L. Higgins, Wilson, Fisher, W. A. Nalder, F. Luerß, and G. A. White. A poll will be taken on March 8. On Wednesday last one of the Charitable Aid men employed in the Public Gardens had a narrow escape of being shot. He was working near the corrugated iron fence at the > back of the College put-buildings, when a bullet, fired from within the College grounds, passed through the fence, and fell at his feet. Houlin, who is suffering from heart disease, was severely affected by the fright, and did not completely recover from the shock for a day or two. The members of the Lincoln road Band of Hope assembled at the Lincoln road Baptist Church on Friday last, and were marched to a paddock, kindly lent for the occasion by Mr J. Hellewell. After lunch, all kinds of sports were indulged in, each child receiving a present. Tea was partaken of at half-past 5, after which, the children, headed by the banner, walked in procession to the churoh, where they were entertained during the evening with songs, readings, recitations, and speeches. Tho Band of Hope waß established in 1870, and now numbers 150 members. A noteworthy addition has been made to the rare and choioa flowering plants at the Public Gardens, in the form of a splendid new begonia. The seeds of this fine flower were received from London last Beacon, and it is now in bloom. The blossoms are cf a deep rose pink, wtih bright yellow stamens, and are of remarkable size, some measuring from four to five inches across. It may be safely asserted that thiß begonia is superior, both in the size and profusion of Ub flowers, to anything of the kind grown here before. Mr Armstrong has bestowed on his new acquisition the name of " Lady Gordon." At a meeting of the Vestry of St John's Church, Bangiora, held on Friday evening, the tender of Messrs Pollock and Thompson to erect the new nave and aisles in accordance with^the part already completed, for the sum of £718 12s 6d, was accepted. The plans were prepared by Mr Mountfort, architect. Ihe building, when complete, will be one of the best of the kind in the Provincial district ; it is lofty, well ventilated and lighted, and in striking contrast to the present naves and aisles, which are to be aold for removal as soon as the work commences. A meeting of the members of tfee German Church was held at 2 p.m. on Saturday, at the Wellington Hotel. Over 40 gentlemen were present, and the chair was ocoupied by Mr J. G. Euddenklau. It was resolved, on the motion of Mr P. Tisch, seconded by Mr C. Vogel—" That the accounts sent in by Mr P. G. Jacobsen cannot be paid out of the money now in the hands of the Trustees." It was also decided, on the motion of Mr C. Yogel, seconded by Mr E. Menzel— " That the Trustees be empowered to invest the money now in their hands as they think proper for a term of two years." The proceedings then terminated. A meeting of the North Canterbury District 1.0.0.F.,M.U., was held in the Oddfellows' Hall on Saturday. The purpose of the gathering was to receive the report of the Committee appointed to consider the subject of getting up some demonstration in connection with the festivities of the Exhibition season. Ihe chair was occupied by Bro Woodford, District G.M., and the Committee reported in favour of holding a monster procession of Friendly Societies at some date to be hereafter fixed. During the discussion which followed, some other suggestions were made, and it was decided to refer them to the various Lodges, who were requested lo appoint delegates to consider the matter. On Friday evening, Mr Benjamin Btocks, who has occupied the post of Foreman at the Lyttelton Graving Dock works during its construction, was presented with a very handsome clock cased in marble, and bearing a suitable inscription, by the employees on the work. In making tho presentation, one of the employees said that Mr Stock's just and impartial manner had gained him the esteom of all on the work, and he asked Mr Stock's acceptance of the present as a token of the general respect in which he was held by them. Mr Stocks, in replying, complimented tho men on the manner in which the work had been done, and thanked them most heartily for their very handsome present. A Committee meeting in connection v/i h the forthcoming Begatta at Kaiupoi was held in the Council Chamber on Friday evening ; present — Mr J. C. Porter, Commodore, in the chair, and eight members of the Committee. The collectors reported the result of their canvas for subscriptions, and the meeting drew up the programme for the regatta, to be held on March 17. The sailing race is to start at 11 a.m., and tho first pulling race at lpm. It was reaolved to advertise the programme in the Times and Press newspapers, bb well aB tenders for a band and for the sale of privileges and cards. A suggestion to add to tbe number of the Committee was negatived, as the preliminary public meeting had fixed the number after considerable discussion. The meeting then adjourned to March 10, to receive moneys and appoint sub- Committee. The afternoon exhibition of Thompson's Diorama of the Zulu War on Saturday last was attended by an enormous crowd of juveniles, the Academy of Music being thronged in every part. The youngsters expressed their approbation of the pictures and mechanical displays by the heartiest applause, and were sent away at the conclusion of the show in the best possible humour, each child having received a toy by way of a memento of its visit. In the evening there was also a large attendance, and tho various scenes depicted, and tho proprietor's graphic descriptions, were received with the usual warm applause. At the conclusion, a large number of gifts were distributed among the audience, the chief present, a lady's gold watch, beinggiven to Mrs Bamsay. The diorama will bo shown again this evening, when tho principal gift is to be a suite of furniture A similar suite will be given away each night during the week. Tho Biccarton School Committee met on Monday last; present— Key C. Bowen (Chairman), Messrs N. Ellis, F. Holmes, and T. Wilson. Ihe question of the formation of Fendaltown into a district school district wua postponed, as it was found that no new district could be constituted until January next. The following persons were voted by thottonimiltee for election to the vacancies in the Education Board, viz. : Messrs George Booth, William Montgomery, and William Parkorson. Mr T. Wilson explained, with reference to tho complaint mado by him at the annual meeting about home lessonß, that his statement as to tho number of sums which hia son was set to do had subsequently been verified by the master, who had acknowledged himself to have been mistaken in the matter. The Chairman corroborated Mr Wilson's statement, and expressed regret that he should have been so far misrepresented. Complaints having been made of the master's horse being at large in the school enclosure, it was resolved that Mr Williamson be requested to keep his horss off the playground during school hours. The Committee then adjourned. Somo prominent citizens, including tho Mayor and two of tho City members of Parliament (says the Dunedin Slar), on Thursday got up " sweeps " under the very nosea of the police. Of course their names were taken down, with a view of ulterior proceedings, by tho vigilant detective oflicer in attendance. They were nothing daunted by tho proximity of tho officer of the law, and had their "swoops " on every race. Some of the fair sex oven had the temerity to draw crown " sweeps " on tho Cup ; but we imagine that the police were too gallant to intorforo with them. Possibly the police were awed by the threat of the

wife of one of our leading citizens, that if they were to be summoned sho would go round tho course and. collect shilling subscriptions with which to pay the possible fine and costs. A cricket match was played on Saturday at Lancaster Park between an Eleven of the Lyttelton 0.0. and the Third Eleven of Lan* caster Park, resulting in a victory for the latter by seven wickets. Scores — Lancaster Park, 85 and 13 for three wickets ; Lyttelton, 26 and 68. The butcher's shop and dwelling-house belonging to Mr Brown, Bituated at Woolston, od the Ferry road, about a quarter of a mile from the steam wharf, were completely destroyed by fire at half- past two this morning. Very little property was saved from the fire. The building was insured for £300 in the Viotoria office. The first and second prizes in the Nelson match, being £10 and a cup value £10, and £9 respectively, havo been struck out. All the other prizes have been reduced 25 per cont. With regard to the latter, there will be a reconsideration by the Council, and it is probable that the amount deducted will be refunded when the Association is in funds. " Gelatino-diaspon " ia the name given to a new explosive produced by a M. Anders. It io composed of wood-cellulose and nitro-glycerino j is unaffected by cold, is not sensible to blows or shocks, and explodes only by a sudden increase of temperature to about 320 degrees Fahrenheit. It burns quickly when ignited in the open air, and is not affected by water. An estimate has been published of the Municipal estate of the City of Paris. From it all national monuments and buildings situated in Paris have been left out. This estimate shows property of one kind and another valued at £42,000,000, in which sum are included sixty-four churches, worth nearly £7,000,000, twenty barracks worth £1,000,000, 143 primary schools set down at £2,500,000, nineteen cemeteries at £1,300,000, forty-four parks and squares at nearly £11,000,000, and ninety-six statues and fountains at £140,000.

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https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/TS18820227.2.10

Bibliographic details

Star, Star, Issue 4320, 27 February 1882

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3,204

Star Star, Issue 4320, 27 February 1882

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