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THS GENERAL ELECTIONS

THE NOMINATIONS. CHRISTOHUROH NORTH. The nominations of candidates for the electoral district of Ohristohurch North were made at the City Council Ohanabers at noon to*day, before G. L. Lee, Esq., Returningofficer. A temporary platform had been erected on the plot of ground before the Chambers, round which wero gathered a number of electors and others, notwithstanding the inconvenience of a shower of rain that fell during the proceedings. At the appointed hour the Returning-officer asiended tho platform, and read the writ, and called upon any elector of the district present to nominate a candidate. Mr J. Piper said that three years ago he had Eoccnded the nomination of a gentleman whom he now proposed to represent the district in the General Assembly, Mr S. P. Andrews. Mr H. Atkinson seconded the nomination. Mr J. P. Jameson proposed Mr H. Thomson, an old resident of many years' standing, as a gentleman who would certainly look after the interests of the city. Mr Thomson wob also a supporter of the Hall Government, and had had considerable experience as a public man in the Hospital Board and other bodies. Mr J. M. Thompson seconded the nomination. The Returning Officer ihen called on Mr Andrews, as being the firßt candidate nominated, to address the electors present. Mr 8. P. Andrews would not detain them in the wet with a long speech. He had, as a previous representative of Christchurch in the Assembly, always acted openly and fearlessly. He denied tbat he was a class representative, and as he had done in the past, so would he always in the future support any good measures, no matter what man brought them forward. He had been brought up as a Liberal at the feet of Mr Wynn Williams, whieh gentleman had first brought him forward as a candidate on a previous occasion. If they returned him he would always act straightforwardly, and as he was free from any connections that would hamper him, would expose any abuses that camo under his notice. He left the result of the election in tbeir hands. Mr H. Thomeon had an objection to public nominations, as being contrary to the spirit of the ballot. He denied tbat he was the nominee of the Hall Government, but if returned he would give that Government a general support if their future action was consistent with their past. In New Zealand the distinction between Liberals and socalled Oonservatives existed only in the imagination of some people. (No, no.) He would like to seo a strong Government with a strong Opposition. He quoted from Sansard to show that Mr Andrews had been inconsistent in his aotion in the House, supporting and Bpeaking in favour of the Government afc one time, and opposing them in other measures. They were aware that he was not an inexperienced publio man, and that he had a knowledge of conducting public business, besides which he had leisure and would be able to go to Wellington untramelled by considerations of personal affairs. He was content to leave his oause with the electors to be settled on the 9th. The Returning-officer then called for a show of hands, which resulted as follows *. — Thomson 26 Andre wb 20 The show of hands was declared to be in favour of Mr Thomson, and Mr Andrews demanded a poll, which will take place at the Council Chambers on Friday, Deo. 9. Tho official declaration of the result will be made at noon on Saturday, Deo. 10. OHRISTOHURCH SOUTH. | The nominations for the Ohrißtchurch South Electorate took place in the Odd- | fellowß' Hall, Lichfield street. The Returning*Officer was Mr Alexander Lean. A I number of gentlemen occupied seats on the platform, and in the body of the hall there was a large attendance. The writ having been duly read, Mr Lean invited the electors to propose candidates. Mr Peter Cunningham nominated Mr John Anderson, whose career was too well known to need eulogy. He had known him for 20 years, and from the first day he had known him he had never ceased to respect him. Even his opponents would admit that ho was a worthy citizen • and hiß seeking Parliamentary honours was a fitting and a noble aspiration. (Applause.) If Mr Anderson was too old for the work, the best statesman in the world ought to have retired 20 years ago. The only difference in this respect between the candidates was that one had white hair on his hoad, and the other had none ot all. (Laughter.) We did not want speakers in the Houbp, aud Mr Anderson would be essentially a worker, who would represent trade and commerce in the Assembly. Mr Anderson having been tho representative of several institutions in Ohristchurch, ought to have a fair trial as a member of Parliament. (Cheers and hisses.) If the gentleman who started the hissing was a sensible man, he would give the speaker credit for upholding his own opinions, just as tho speaker was willing to do by others. Mr Clarkson Beconded tho nomination. Mr 0. P. Hulbert nominated Mr John Holmes, barrister. Very many people in this important district of some 2000 eleotors were of opinion that their representative should be a man of ability, who could so put forward his opinions as to oommand attention and respect. Mr Hulbert briefly stated the aims which his nominee had in view in seeking a parliamentary position. Mr Nicholas Bowden seconded the nomination. Mr John Anderson briefly intimated that if returned his entire support would be given to such Liberal measures— fairly for the good of the country — as might be brought forward from time to time. Ho would most certainly try to suppress this most objectionable system of nomination (hear, hear), which wos bo contrary to the spirit of the ballot. (Applause.) Mr John Holmes would take especial care to secure an amendment of the Regulations of Elections Act in the matter of nominations. He explained tho Bystem of written nominations obtaining in Victoria. The speaker touched upon Bome personal matters, combating the assertion put forth th<\t he was a political adventurer, and explaining that he had a large stake in the country, as an owner of land, and as an employer of labour. Whilst ho was paying about £70 per year in taxation under existing circumatances, he would be paying doublo as much under the systems of taxation which he had advocated. That, he thought, effectually disposed of Mr Hall's sneers againat those who advocated certain proeressivo measures, (fjoud applause.) His religion mattered to no man ; for the law knew of no distinction. And with regard to his nationality, ho wa?, like Fitzgerald and Crosbio Ward (cheers), an Irishman of English descent. The speakor touched upon his profession, upon tho advantage of the power to fjivo fit expression to opinions, upon tho enthusiasm wliich ho had for a long course of years studied politics, ond upon the thoroughness with which he had alwayß supported true Liberalism. Land reform was spoken of afc eomo length, and the speaker, in concluaion, claimed that his training had been such as to fit him for an athlete intellectually, which was what was wanted, having a due regard to tho interests of this portion of tho Colony. (Mr Holmes rosumed his seat amidst prolonged applause.) Tho Returning Officer : Tho show of hands is in favour of John Holmes. (Loud and prolonged cheering.) Mr P. Cunningham : Mr Returning Officer, I demand a poll on behalf of John Anderson . A voto of thanks to tho Roturning Officor terminated the proceedings. SYDENHAM. Tho nomination of candidates for the representation of Sydenham took placo at tho Borough Chambers at noon to-day. A convenient covered hustings had been erected for the accommodation of the candidates and othora taking part in the proceedings. About 70 persons were present. The Returning Officer, Mr G. Booth, read lho advertisement colling the meeting. Mr T. H Bone proposed Mr J. W. Treadwell as a fit and proper porson to represent the Borough. Mr Treadwell, as an elector of the Borough, would second his own nomination, as tho elector who was to havo done so had discovered that his name was wrongly spelt on the roll. ! Mr K. Pavitt nominated Mr Charles Clark, who he said was a gontloman of considerable

experience in public life, and who had in the past fought the battle of the people against what was known as the squatting class. He waß also a gentleman who would be likely to possess influence and to make friends in the House. Mr W. B. Campbell seconded the nomination of Mr Clark. Mr S. Powell had much ' pleasure in nominating Mr J. R. Andrew, who was, he considered, the most truly representative man in the district. What the electors Bhould consider was nofc fche geniality of tne candidate, but his politics. Mr H. Ballinger seconded the nomination of Mr Andrew. Mr E. Jones had to perform the plea#ing duty of nominating Mr W. N\ hite. (Hear, hear.) That gentleman had worked for tbem with zeal in the Council, and would do the same if returned to the House. Mr W. Miller had much pleasure in seconding the nomination of Mr White. He counselled the electors not to be led away by a combination of squatters, freetraders, and land sharks. Mr Treadwell said that the present Customs tariff was merely an engine foi* drawing blood from the working and trading classes. The squatters, of whom the Hon J. Hall was chief, had wrongly acquired land, and acts had been passed to legalise this spoliation. The squatters should be compelled to pay more than they did towards the coßt of the railways. He had been attempted to bo bought over from the interests of the labouring classes twice during the past 6 years. Once by the editor of the Press, and on another occasion he was offend £1200 in Messrs Miles and Co.'s office, for eome property he wished to dispose of, if he would abandon Sir George Grey, and write for Mr Hall. If returned, he would go in to the House as a representative of the working classes, who would be able to beard the Treasurer, and show him how his accounts were cooked. Mr Clark said that he had come forward simply because, at the time he did so, Mr Treadwell was the only candidate in the field ; and he thought the electors should have a ohoice. He was, in spite of what had been said of him, a friend of progress. He would support the Hall Government, but would insist on their passing further Liberal measures. (Hear, hear.) [A Voice : " You won't be returned."] He then proceeded to critioise the opposing candidates. Mr Treadwell was a conundrum. If Sydenham got a second member, he hoped Mr Andrew would be his colleague. Through all the dense fog of Mr White's 'speeches, the only thing visible was that he would either want a vote of want of confidence in the present Government, or at least vote for it. Mr White had led him to believe he was not coming forward. As to himself, 'he had Berved the public faithfully for many years, and had cared neither for squatters or merchants. Be was not under the power of any bank. [Question.] No ; it was no question. With regard to the drainage question, he would not support anything contrary to the wishes of the electors (Hear, hear) He had received a number of letters from all parts of the Oolony, wishing him success. [A Voice : From John HaU ?] No ; there was one from an actor and true gentleman, Mr Hoskins. (Laughter. A Voice: He wants another benefit.) Mr Clark also spoke briefly on various other matters. Mr Andrew said he would not detain them long. Mr Treadwell was a man who could prove that black waa white if he thought fit. A great injustice had been done to the whole Oolony by tho way in which the Native lands had been disposed of ; 600,000 acres were being oisposed of at about 6s 6d an acre. He quoted from a speech of Mr Bryce in 1879 to show that the matter had not been considered in the Cabinet. Mr Bryce also said he would stop the sales to private individuals, yet this had nofc been done. A few private persons — a Canterbury speculator in particular — had prevented the views expressed by Mr Bryce from being carried out. He (Mr Andrew) asked them not to be led away either by a popular or an eccentric man, but to calmly consider who was the best man. (Hear, hear.) Mr White would content himself with putting himßelf right on one or two points in which he had been misrepresented or misunderstood. It had been said he was opposed to the West Coast Railway. This was erroneous. Now that he found the Government was unable to make the line, he was certainly in favour of a company making it. Then it had been said that he was in favour of the reduction ot wages. He would point to his action in the past to show that that was not truo. He held the labourer was worthy of his hire. The Government had not acted rightly in this matter. They had reduced the wages of the platelayers, who had to work ail tho year round without a single holiday. It had been said that the Government had allowed him to thro-v his contracts up, in order to gain his support. This was not true. According to the terms of the contracts, ho was perfeotly at liberty fco throw them up, and Government Was unable to prevent him. He had never led Mr Clark to believe that he was not going to come forward. All he had dono was to make sure that his business would allow of hie going to Parliament bofore he intimated his intention of coming forward. He expressed hia intention of avoiding personalities, which did no good. Be thought that open nominations were wrong, and opposed to the spirit of fche ballot. (Hear, hear.) Mr Clark stated that he had been led to believe Mr White was not coming forward from a conversation he had with that gentleman and Mr Hill of the Bank of New South Wales. Mr White said he certainly did not remember such a conversation. A show of hands was then taken, which resulted : — W.White 33 0. Clark 8 J. R. Andrew 7 J. W. Treadwell 6 A poll was demanded on behalf of Mr Clark, and a vote of thanks to the ReturningOfficer, moved by Mr Clark, and seconded by J Mr White, terminated the proceedings. j STANMORE DISTRIOT. The nominations for this district took place at noon in the Pubic Schoolroom. The Returning Officer, Mr F. E. Wright, having gone through the usual formalities, Mr Ephraim Toomer nominated Mr W. P. Cowliahaw as a gentleman of experience and able to represent the diatrict. Mr B. Greon seconded the nomination. Mr W. F. Hubbard nominated Mr W. H. Pilliet, whose career showed him to havo been a consistent Liberal, and the only true Liberal in the field, representing no class or institution, and standing on his own bottom. Mr J. Jamison seconded the nomination. Mr W. H. Cooke nominated Mr W. Flcsher as tho most suitable and proper candidate, whose character as an honest man was unimpeachable. Mr W. Kerr seconded the nomination. Mr Olepliane nominated himself, Robert Olophane ; apparently with the aole object of making a speech in favour of Mr Pilliet. Mr Cowlishaw seconded the nomination. Mr Flesher, bolieving that Mr Cowliahaw was not an elector of tho district, would second the nomination of Mr Clcphane. Mr Pilliet disclaimed all knowledge of Mr Olephano'B tactics. The Roturning Officer was about to take tho show of hands, when Mr Flesher urged that the respective candidates should first be allowed to address tho mooting. Tho Returning Officer, in the absence of any legal opinion, decided to take the show of hands at onco. The Bhow of hands was then taken, with following result: — For Mr Cowlishaw, 18; for Mr Pilliet, 29 ; for Mr Flesher, 20 ; and for Mr Olophane, 6. Mr Olephano begged to retire from tho contest. Mr Flosher, as seconder of Mr Olephano'B nomination, would not conßPnt. to his retiring. 3he Returning Officer declared that Mr Pilliot had tho majority. Mr Cowlißhaw domanded a poll, which tho Returning Officor announced would tako place on Doc. 9. A voto of thanks to the Returning Officer having been carriod, tho business of the meoting closed. AVON. Tlie nomination of a condidate to represent the Avon district in the General Assembly took placo at noon yostorday at tho District School, Riccarton. Thoro was a very small attendance of electors. Tho Roturning Officor (Mr F. J. Kimbell) having explained the business and read the writ, called upon those present to nominate ' a candidate.

Mr C. 0. Bowen proposed the re-ei ec ti 0 n of the Hon. W. Rolleston. Mr Jupp seconded the nomination. No olher candidate being proposed, tho Eeturning Officer declared the Hon W. Rolloston duly elected. Tho Hon W. Rolleston thanked the electors for the renewal of the confidence they had reposed hi him for bo many years, and took occasion to refer to Mr Stout's letter published in the Times of this morning. He said Mr Stout was altogether wrong in his facts, which was the more objectionable as coming from a former Minister of the Crown. Ho commented upon the more important passoges in the letter, and then proceeded to remark upon the telegrams forwarded to the Times by the Bishop of Nelson, and published in to-day's issue of that paper. He also read fche subjoined telegram from him-elf to the Bishop, which, on being called away from Christchurch, he forwarded from Temuka : — ; r " Temuka, Nov. 30, 1881. * " To tho Bishop of Nelson, " Napier. " 1 have received your Lordship's telegram of the 20th inst. The wholo correspondence will be published on my return to Chrißtchurch tomorrow or Friday. I have only to remark that it iB not your oppoaition that I deprecate, nor should I wish to avoid fair and intelligent criticism. But no publio man, any more than a private individual, can silently tolerate the slanderous imputation of base motives. "His character ia the property of the publio, and by the public he musfc bo judged." Mr Rolleston then concluded by again thanking the electors for again returning him as their representative. A vote of thanks to the Returning Officer concluded fche proceedings. HEATHCOTE. The nomination of candidates to represent the Electoral Distriot of Heathcote took place to-day at noon, in the Oddfellows* Hall, Woolston. The Returning Officer, Mr J. Grierson, having opened the proceedings, called for nominations. Mr H. A. Bamford proposed Mr J. T. Fisher, and dwelt upon the many services that gentleman had rendered the district for a long period, bofch as a member of the Road Board, a member of the Provincial Council, and also of the General Assembly. Mr A. Dunbar seconded the motion. Mr R. Vincent proposed Major Alfred Hornbrook. Mr John Smith seconded the nomination. Mr W. Neighbours nominated Mr W. H. Wynn- Williams. Mr A. Cracroft Wilson seconded the nomi* nation, end expressed an opinion that if they elected Mr Williams they would elect the best man. Mr Fisherj who was greeted with applause, announced himself as a deoided opponent of the present Government. He had selected this part of the distriot because his political career had been oonneoted with it from the first, and although he could have gone to. Lincoln or Sydenham, he preferred meeting hia old friends afc the Beathcofct*. Alluding to the candidature of Mr Wynn- Williams he thought it would be better for the electors to choose a local man — one acquainted with the wants aud of the district— rather than a Ohristohurch gentleman, who, for all they knew, might have been waited upon by gentlemen from the Drainage Board, a body whioh he (Mr Fisher) had strenuously opposed. Alluding to the present Government, he said that they were Micawber-like— always waiting for something to turn up, and then Bailing with the stream. (Oheers and disapprobation.) He could assure them that he meant to go to the poll, and if elected hi would, as he had hitherto done, endeavour to serve them faithfully. If, however, they should think fit to choose another man, he would retire upon the honours they had con- . ferred on him in the past. (Oheers.) Major Hornbrook, who was suffering from bronohitis, thought that the Dog tax should be allocated to the Road Boards. He was in favour of the strictest economy, but would not object to borrowing more money, provided that it was expended on reproductive works, and on no others. He waa in favour of cutting up the large runs, and submitting them to public auotion. He was also in favour of the purchase of land, say from 50 to 600 acres, by deferred payments. (Applause.) In reply fco a question, Major Hornbrook said that he would go in as an independent member — " measureß not men " was his motto, and he would support the Government of tbe day, sb long as they brought forward good measures. (Oheers.) Mr Wynn -Williams said that as he purposed addressing the eleotors fully on Monday night, he would not detain them now. He had been a resident amongst them for 25 years, and had had the honour of being returned unopposed to the Provincial Council for the Heathcote district. So far from being connected with the Drainage Board, no man had opposed that body more than he had done; in fact, he had always said that it was wrong to tax the outlying districts for the drainage of Christchurch. (Oheers.) He had not canvassed, neither would ho do so, and he hoped that the time would soon come when the people would be left to ohoose their representatives without being annoyed by being canvassed for their votes. There was one point on which he wished to be distinctly understood. He never would be a party to assist in turning out the present Government, or any like them in order to put in Sir George Grey, Mr Sheehan, and thoßO gentlemen who formed the Government of whioh his friend (Mr Fisher) was a member — (oheers)— and he was surprised that men like Mr Fisher and Mr Montgomery, who wished to see the railway tariff properly equalised, should oppose a Canterbury Ministry, who were the only men likely to do j ÜBtice to Canterbury in that respect If it came to aquestion of turning Mr Hall out in order to pufc Mr Eheeban and his friends in, he (Mr Williams) would oppose it to the uttermost. (Cheers.) Mr Fisber explained that he would support any man who brought forward liberal measures, whether it waß Sir G. Grey or any one else. The Returning Officer then called for a show of hands, with the following result : — Hornbrook 21 Fisher 14 Williams 4 And declared the show of hands in favour of Major Hornbrook. Mr Fisher demanded a poll, which will take place on the 9th inßt. A vote of thanks to the Returning Officer terminated the proceedings. LYTTELTON. The meeting for the nomination of candidates for the representation of Lyttelten in tho Genoral Assembly was held at noon today. The Returning-Officer, Oaptain Gibson, read the writ for the election. Tho following gentlemen were nominated : — Mr Harry Al! wright by Mr J. R. Willcox, seconded by Mr Atkinson. Hon E. Richardson by Mr Grubb, seconded by Mr Hollis. Mr S. R. Webb by Mr Bennington, seconded by Mr James Pitcaithley. The candidates briefly addressed thoee present, and afterwards a show of hands was taken and declared to be in favour of Mr Richardson. A vote of thanks to tho Returning Officer concluded the proceedings. KAIAPOI. The nominations were, Isaac Wilson and J. H. Lee. 'lho show of hands gave, for Wilson about 60, and for Loe 8. A poll was domandod. ASHBURTON. The nominations for Wakanui took placo at tho County Salojards Office, Mr George Jameson being the Keturning-Offieor. Mr O'Reilly announced his intention to withdraw in favour of Mr Ivcsa. Mr John Lambie, of Kyle, proposod J. C. I Wason, and Andrew Dawson, of Waterton, seconded the nomination. Air James Brown, of Wakanui, proposed Joßeph Ivess, and James Louden, of Kyle, seconded. C. N. Mackie, Rakaia, proposed 0. W. Purnoll, and James Davis, Longbcnch, seconded. The bliow of hands was — Ivess, 47 ; Wason, 13 ; Purnell, 10. LINCOLN. Ihe nomination of candidates for tho representation of tho Lincoln district in Parliament took place at the Bchoolbouao, Probbloton, at noon yesterday. About 50 persons were present. Mr 0. L. Davi», the Returning.Offioer, opened the proceedings by reading

■ . _____ tho advertisement of the nomination, and the clauses of the Act referring to the subject. Mr J. Maskrey had much pleasure in proposing Mr fl. W. Peryman to represent the district in Parliament. Mr C. R. Leadley seconded the nomination of Mr Peryman. *He did so, principally from the reason that Mr Peryman was a local man, and, therefore, would use his influence for the benefit of the district. Mr John Sharp proposed Mr A. P. O'Callaghan as a fit and proper person to represent the district. Mr Janies Bell begged to second the nomination. He knew that Mr O'Callaghan was energetic and thoroughgoing in politics, and would be very useful to fche district in the House. A Bhow of handß was taken, which resulted as follows : — A. P. O'Callaghan 13 H. W. Peryman 11 A poll was demanded on behalf of Mr Peryman. A vote of thanks was passed to the Return-ing-Officer for presiding, and the proceedings terminated. ASHLEY. Tbe nominations were M. Dixon, W. F. Pearson, W. Patterson, and J. Guild. The show of hands waß in favour of Mr Pearson. GLADSTONE. The nomination of candidates for therepresentation of the new electoral district of Gladstone was held at the Meat Preserving Companj's works, Washdyke, at noon yesterday. There were about 100 electors present, and a good deal of interest was manifested in the proceedings. The Returning-Officer, Mr F. W. Stubbs, read the writ of election, and called upon the electors to nominate a candidate. Mr Richard Buist proposed Captain Sutter as a fit and proper person to represent the district. Mr J. C. M —errow seconded the nomination, and pointed out that if tho electors returned Captain Sutter they would have a representative who would look well after their interests. Mr J. Page proposed Dr Fisher as a fit and proper person to represent the district in the General Assembly. Mr A. Wright seconded the nomination of Dr Fisher, and pointed out thafc he would fairly represent the interests of all classes. . Mr J. Crawford, of Pleasant Point, proposed Mr W.J. Newton. Mrß.Orton seconded the nomination. Mr W. Warne proposed Mr David Anderson. Mr D. Friel seconded the nomination. No other candidates being proposed, the nominees then addressed thoße present The Returning-Officer then callod for a show of hands with the following result : — W. H.Butter 13 D. Anderson 6 Dr Fisher 5 W.J.Newton 1 On the motion of Captain Sutter, seconded by Dr Fisher, a vote of thanks was passed to the Returning-Officer, and the proceedings terminated. {BY TELEGRAPH.) [Peb Pbbss Association.] AUORLAND, Due. I. For City Weßt, Dr Wallis, Messrs J. M. Dargaville, W. C. Laing, and A. Fleming were proposed, and for City East, Sir George Grey and Mr J. M. Olarke. For Manakau, Bir G. M. O'Rorke and Mr Owen M'Goe were nominated. The show ofhands gave the former 36 ; and the 1-tter 6. For Waitemata the nominations were — Messrs Hurst and Allison. The show of hands was 29 for the former, and 25 for- the latter. For the Bay of Islands Messrs Hobbs and Lundon were nominated. The ahow of hands was in favour of Mr Hobbs. For Rodney, Messrs Seymour George,. Shepherd, and Parnell were nominated. The Bhow of hands was in favour of Mr S. George. NEW PLYMOUTH, Dbc. 1. For Taranaki Messrs Joseph Oolesby and Oolonel Trim bio were proposed. The show of hands was equal. OPUNAKE, Dbo. 2. Major Atkinson addressed the electors last night. A vote of confidence waß proposed, but the majority was against it. MARTON, Dbo. 1. For the Rangitikei seat to-day, Sir W. Fox and Mr John Stevens wero nominated. Tho show of hands was in favour of Mr Stevens. A poll was demanded on behalf of Bir W. Fox. 4 WELLINGTON, Dko. 1. The nominations for the Hutt took place to-day. Messrs T. Mason, Henry Jacksbn, M. L. Marks, and Duncan Sinclair were proposed. The show of hands was in favour of Mr Maeon. At Te Aro, Meßsra J. H. Shaw, Cl Johnston, and E. Stafford wero proposed. Mr Price retired in favour of Mr Shaw, whom he proposed as a Liberal candidate. The show of handa was largely in favour of Mr Shaw. A poll was demanded. BLENHEIM, Dbo. 1. The nominations for Wairau to-day were — Messrs H. Dodson and A. P. Seymour. The show of hands was in favour of Mr Dodson. KUMARA, Dkc. 2. Messrs Edwin Blake and Richard John Seddon were nominated. Tho show of hands was in favour of Mr Seddon. GREYMOUTH, Dbo. 2. The nominations were Messrs Joseph Petrine, Frank Guinness, and David Madden. The show of hands was— Petrie, 71 ; Guinness, 39; Madden, 28. Mr Guinnoss demanded a pole. OAMARU, Dec. 2. The nominations wero Samuel Edward Shrimski, and James Hassell. The Bhow of hands was in favour of Mr Shrimski. At Waitaki, Messrs John Beid and Thomas Duncan were nominated, the show of hands boing in favour of tho former. DUNEDIN, Dbc. 1. Mr James Fulton was elected to represent Taieri without opposition. For Mount Ida Messrs C. A. De Lautour and J. S. M'Kenzie were nominated. The show of hands resulted — De Lautour, 14 ; M'Kenxie, 28. For Waikonaiti Messrs James Green and A. C. Thompson were nominated, and the show of hands was in favour of Mr Thompson. For Wakatipu Messrs T. Fergus, A. M'Bride, and A. 0. Thompson wero nominated. Tho show of hands resulted— Fergus, 24 ; M'Bride, 15 ; Thompson, 14. For Bruce Messrs W. A. Murray, Jamea Adam, and James Rutherford were nominated, the show of hands resulting— Adam, 82; Rutherford, 2i j and Murray, 15.

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THS GENERAL ELECTIONS, Star, Issue 4248, 2 December 1881

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THS GENERAL ELECTIONS Star, Issue 4248, 2 December 1881

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