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THE GENERAL ELECTIONS.

LYTTELTON NOMINATION.

The nomination of candidates to represent the district of Lyttelton took place at the Colonists' Hall yesterday at noon. About eiity persons were present. The Returning Officer, Mr W. H. Eyes, jun., read the writ appointing him to hold the election for the district, and called on some one to nominate a candidate. Mr Adam Chalmers ascended the platform, and said that he had great pleasure in proposing Mr Hugh Percy Murray- Ay nsley as a fib and proper person to represent the district. Mr Murray- Aynsley had a great advantage, as he possessed knowledge Acquired by previous services, and was well acquainted with the usages of the House, or, as the speaker expressed it, " knew the ropes well." He was certainly notashowy politician, but he had shown that he was familiar with tho requirements of the district and knew how to represent them in the House. The speaker remarked that the best evidence of Mr Aynaley's popularity was that his support had gradually increased until he had tho majority of tho elector* at his back, which he felt sure would be found to be the case when the Eeturning Officer declared the result of the poll, at which time Mr Aynsley's supporters would be in a position to cay that " their wives and families were quite well thank you." Mr Allwright when addressing the electors had referred to Mr Aynsley having received £210 from the House, which would come in very useful for carrying on the election, and this he considered was a very petty manner of attacking his opponents. Mr Allwright himself was in receipt of a certain £100 which was no more than his due, but still this might be found to come in very uaef ul at times like tho present. Although mention had been made on many occasions regarding 200 guineas received by members, he noticed that not a word had been said by the parties who alluded to the fact concerning what was being done by tho Government party to carry through tho election. Sir George Grey was receiving £1750 per annum, and the Hon J. T. Fisher £1250, in addition to the usual honorariums ; besides which they had the privilege of using tho Hinemoa, Stella, and special trains as they required for securing their re-election. DuriDg his experience in the Colony lie had seen many come downs, bub never bucli a one as might be seen at tho present day when a man who started as a despotic Governor o the Colony descended to an election touter, for that was what Sir George Grey was at the present time. He felt very thankful that he could descend no lower. A few weeks ago Mr Allwright had declared himself in favour of the Grey policy without Sir George Groy at the head of the Government, but as soon as Sir George arrived here he at once became a strong Greyite. He would like to know what kind of un " ite" he would bo next week after the election had taken place. Sir George Grey, on coming here, found his young friend Mr Allwright in great difficulty politically, and at once went to bis assistance :by addresjing the electors here, and he felt very much disgusted with what took place at that mectiog. At Mr Allwright's mseting tho electors had been asked to listen to Dp Turnbull, Mr Andrews, and Mr Izott, yet when Mr Rolleston, who had done more for Canterbury than any one, got up to speak at the late moeting of Sir George Grey's, and refute the charges made against him by an obscure individual, with a strong cockney accent, he found the greatest difficulty in obtaining a hearing, and when Mr Saunders essayed to speak the Chairman of the meeting, Mr Allwright himself, wanted to know what ho wanted on the platform. He considered that Mr Saunders had aB much right there &s Sir George Grey. Mr Allwright had declared his intention of supporting the Redistribution of Seats Bill, which, in its present state, meant that Lyttelton would be only half an electorate, the town, therefore, would lose half of it* influence in that way, and the other half in sending Mr Allwright to represent it. The population basis alone would nover answer for such a town as Lyttelton, as it would have to join itself with that thriving placo Akaroa to obtain a full member, and so give that place an opportunity of taking away part of the trade. Mr Allwright was undoubtedly possessed of good practical ideas and had done good service in Lyttelton as Councillor, Mayor, and in other positions. He had worked with Mr Allwright for many years past, but ho could not support his return as the representative for Lyttelton. He concluded by saying that he had every confidence in the result of tho election, and asking the electors to support Mr Murray- Aynsley. (Applause.)

The nomination was seconded by Mr John Grubb, who as one of the oldest so', tiers in Canterbury had much pleasure in so doing.

Mr S. R. Webb came forward and nominated Mr Harry Allwright, and remarked that he was sorry that some one who could have done more justice to the subject had nob oomo forward. Mr Chalmers had referred to the good that Mr Allwright had dono for Lyttelton, and in nominating that gentle* man! he felt sure that he had great claimg on the support of the electors. Mr Allwright had served on sevoral Boards, &0., and as Mayor and Councillor, in all of which positions he had acquitted himself with ability and acted for the benefit of the town. What was wanted in the institutions of the country and Parliament waa now blood, and lie considered it very absurd to bo always referring to a man's age in that reipect, and in a young country to go on returning a representative simply because he was an elderly man. If such a course were always adopted the youth of the present generation would lose all chance of becoming groat, and their ambition would fade. Mr Allwright, though a young man, had as perfect a right to oppose Mr Aynsley as Mr Aynsley had to oppose him. If returned, ha would go to Wellington as a perfectly independent man to represont Lyttelton, and aa such he hoped they would return him at the head of the poll. He would support the Liberal views of Sir George Grey throughout the Bession, which were framed with a view to benefitting the people at large. The Opposition he might say, had boon willing to support the viows of Sir Georga Grey, but not the man himself. Mr Allwright had certainly a claim on the people of Lyttelton for the great interest ho had always taken in the -welfare of the town. Ho was a self made man, and was deBerving of their higljeßt^esteem. The speaker had known Mr All wrigfit for the past ninteen years, and so was in a position to speak of his qualifications. Mr Allwright would neither represent any absentee or squatter, but would devote his energy to the interests of tho" town, and he had much pleasure in nominating him as a fit and proper person to represent the district. (Applause.) Mr John Stinson, in seconding the nomination, said he did not think that his candidate would be so far behind on the day of the election as one of the previous speakers seemed to think. On the Returning Officer calling for a show of hands, 22 were held up for Mr MurrayAynsley, and 19 for Mr Allwright. Mr Allwright demanded a poll, which will be held between 9 a.m. and 4 p.m. on Sept. 4, at the Colonists' Hall. The two candidates having briefly addressed those present, a vote of thanks was accorded the Returning Officer, and the proceedings terminated.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/TS18790830.2.32

Bibliographic details

THE GENERAL ELECTIONS., Star, Issue 3553, 30 August 1879

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1,318

THE GENERAL ELECTIONS. Star, Issue 3553, 30 August 1879

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